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Are you wearing a poppy this week? watch

    • Community Assistant
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Except it isn't: http://www.britishlegion.org.uk/reme...-of-the-poppy/

    "The poppy is NOT:
    "A symbol of death or a sign of support for war
    "A reflection of politics or religion
    "Red to reflect the colour of blood"
    well ok but i still found it cute
    plus i said 'apparently'
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    No. I'd never worn a poppy until last year, when a friend gave me a white poppy to wear.

    Whilst most people who wear the white poppy aren't pacifist, it is still officially a pacifist symbol, and I'm not a pacifist so I've not worn one this year.

    The red poppy, to me, glorifies militarism and war. I commonly hear that soldiers "died for our freedoms" or "made a sacrifice". Sacrifices were made to gods; even though they were gruesome, they served a greater good. This is, according to many who wear red poppies, the case with the wars too. Yet, World War One was a war between imperial powers who denied their colonial subjects their freedom. We were defending Belgium, who had just committed the genocide of 10 million people in the Congo, and we ourselves had presided over avoidable famines killing millions in India. It wasn't about freedom either: Germany had extended the vote to a greater proportion of the population than we had. As Harry Patch, the last surviving British soldier from the trenches put it before he died in 2009, the First World War was nothing more than legalised mass murder.

    Furthermore, the culture of poppy fascism that we have today, along with the demonization of the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, demonstrates even further that this is about politicising past wars in order to justify present ones.

    I can remember and regret that so many soldiers and civilians alike have died in wars in the past, whether Britain was involved or not, and I can hold that, if we really cared about these soldiers, we wouldn't have sent them into these wars in the first place, given that most of Britain's wars could either have been averted if we'd acted earlier (for example with the USSR in 1936 to use sanctions and other means to take on Nazism) or simply not gone into unnecessary wars (Iraq and World War One, for instance). I can do both without wearing a poppy.

    I wouldn't have any objection to donating to the charity, but it eventually transpired that our freedom was fought for in the war of 1939-1945 between ourselves and Nazi Germany, and this includes the freedom not to wear a poppy. We're not in Nazi Germany, and we're not in North Korea: people shouldn't be being scrutinised for not showing "patriotism", and the media shouldn't be encouraging this either.
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    (Original post by viddy9)
    No. I'd never worn a poppy until last year, when a friend gave me a white poppy to wear.

    Whilst most people who wear the white poppy aren't pacifist, it is still officially a pacifist symbol, and I'm not a pacifist so I've not worn one this year.

    The red poppy, to me, glorifies militarism and war. I commonly hear that soldiers "died for our freedoms" or "made a sacrifice". Sacrifices were made to gods; even though they were gruesome, they served a greater good. This is, according to many who wear red poppies, the case with the wars too. Yet, World War One was a war between imperial powers who denied their colonial subjects their freedom. We were defending Belgium, who had just committed the genocide of 10 million people in the Congo, and we ourselves had presided over avoidable famines killing millions in India. It wasn't about freedom either: Germany had extended the vote to a greater proportion of the population than we had. As Harry Patch, the last surviving British soldier from the trenches put it before he died in 2009, the First World War was nothing more than legalised mass murder.

    Furthermore, the culture of poppy fascism that we have today, along with the demonization of the Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, demonstrates even further that this is about politicising past wars in order to justify present ones.

    I can remember and regret that so many soldiers and civilians alike have died in wars in the past, whether Britain was involved or not, and I can hold that, if we really cared about these soldiers, we wouldn't have sent them into these wars in the first place, given that most of Britain's wars could either have been averted if we'd acted earlier (for example with the USSR in 1936 to use sanctions and other means to take on Nazism) or simply not gone into unnecessary wars (Iraq and World War One, for instance). I can do both without wearing a poppy.

    I wouldn't have any objection to donating to the charity, but it eventually transpired that our freedom was fought for in the war of 1939-1945 between ourselves and Nazi Germany, and this includes the freedom not to wear a poppy. We're not in Nazi Germany, and we're not in North Korea: people shouldn't be being scrutinised for not showing "patriotism", and the media shouldn't be encouraging this either.
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    I will because I want to respect and honour those that died in conflicts to give me the freedoms I have today, a £1 is hardly a small amount and it goes to a good cause.
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    No. My country wasn't involved.
    • Very Important Poster
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    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    No. My country wasn't involved.
    What's your country?
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    No.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    What's your country?
    Hong Kong.
 
 
 

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