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    [QUOTE=PhysicsIP2016;65820117]
    Q5 on June 2013 R

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    Could any help in explaining why the answer is B. Why is charging instantaneous when switch is closed?
    Thanks in advance
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    [QUOTE=ayvaak;65824885]
    (Original post by PhysicsIP2016)

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    Could any help in explaining why the answer is B. Why is charging instantaneous when switch is closed?
    Thanks in advance
    When the switch is closed the capacitor charges up. However, as the capacitor doesn't charge through the resistor there is no resistance when charging. Therefore t = RC = 0, which means the capacitor will charge up instantaneously.
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    [QUOTE=Mowerharvey;65825199]
    (Original post by ayvaak)

    When the switch is closed the capacitor charges up. However, as the capacitor doesn't charge through the resistor there is no resistance when charging. Therefore t = RC = 0, which means the capacitor will charge up instantaneously.
    Thank thay was really useful to clear that up.

    Could anyone help me with this question. Im not sure where why the frequencies have to be compared?

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    Posted from TSR Mobile[/QUOTE]

    Why is initial momentum

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    Also guys. Im not sure how you can simply take the momentums above theta zero from those below the zero to find the muons momentum. Also is the vector diagram that i drew correct. Thanks in advance
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    Im probably being stupid but i cant work out why the answer to the question is C and not D


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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    Im probably being stupid but i cant work out why the answer to the question is C and not D


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    An alpha particle has a charge of +2 and a beta particle has a charge of -1. Therefore the alpha particle has 2q in the equation.
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    I cant quite understand where im going wrong with part bii) any help would be greatly appreciated
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    I cant quite understand where im going wrong with part bii) any help would be greatly appreciated
    Why is the answer B? Im struggling to work out why

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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    Why is the answer B? Im struggling to work out why

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    The charge on an alpha particle is 2+ so you have F of alpha=2Bqv and F of beta=15Bqv so then you divide one by other to get the ratio. Hope that helps.
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    Thank you. That makes sense now

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    (Original post by Mowerharvey)
    An alpha particle has a charge of +2 and a beta particle has a charge of -1. Therefore the alpha particle has 2q in the equation.
    Thank you

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    Could anyone explain the theory behind the answer in the MS in a little more detail for this question?

    Thanks
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    Could anyone help me with derivation from s
    SI units?
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    And also in deriving this? Im not quite sure why the answers B? I keep getting D for some reason
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    Could anyone help me with derivation from s
    SI units?
    F=BIL
    in units: N = T x Amps x m (length)
    therefore T = N / (A x m)

    Hope it helps!
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    And also in deriving this? Im not quite sure why the answers B? I keep getting D for some reason
    Hi. You have the graph of Force and time so the area under the graph represents the momentum. As you get momentum, they have asked to find the speed so you have the mass and momentum also(as you calculated it). Now simply, just substitute the values in the formula for Momentum= Mass multiplied by Velocity and you will get your answer
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    (Original post by ayvaak)
    And also in deriving this? Im not quite sure why the answers B? I keep getting D for some reason
    Area under the graph represents change in momentum, i.e. m(v-u) but since he starts from rest, u = 0. Therefore area under graph = mv

    area = 8x5x0.5 = 20
    20 = mv
    20 = 1.5v
    v= 13.3333
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    Can someone help me with Q13? I don't even understand what this is asking.. Thanks!

    https://60abffc9b401b1c0936e01291c15...%20Physics.pdf
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    (Original post by pinksmartiee)
    Area under the graph represents change in momentum, i.e. m(v-u) but since he starts from rest, u = 0. Therefore area under graph = mv

    area = 8x5x0.5 = 20
    20 = mv
    20 = 1.5v
    v= 13.3333
    (Original post by sabahshahed294)
    Hi. You have the graph of Force and time so the area under the graph represents the momentum. As you get momentum, they have asked to find the speed so you have the mass and momentum also(as you calculated it). Now simply, just substitute the values in the formula for Momentum= Mass multiplied by Velocity and you will get your answer
    (Original post by pinksmartiee)
    F=BIL
    in units: N = T x Amps x m (length)
    therefore T = N / (A x m)

    Hope it helps!
    Thanks so much guys

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    Also.. Q15)a)iii) and
    Q16b)ii) I don't know where the markscheme got p = E/c from..

    http://qualifications.pearson.com/co...e_20110127.pdf
 
 
 
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