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40% teenagers don't pass English or Maths watch

  • View Poll Results: Is this a national problem?
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    I am a 21 year old and for the past three years I have tried to pass my English and Maths. I try and try again but can never pass I am almost to breaking point. This was my third time trying to pass my maths and English however I got a D in English and a F in Maths after that I was devastated I am a moron and deserve to die. I have had learning disabilities all my life and well I can't help failing tests and well after my death I believe there needs to be another way other the GCSE.
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    40% of the country is stupid or impaired, tell us something we don't already know.
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    Interestingly, the literacy rate in Cuba is 99.8%.

    And China has consistently dominated the PISA tests in literacy, numeracy and science all while under the terrible, oppressive CPC.
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    What was this years rate?
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    What are your opinions that teenagers do not get a C or above in english or maths?

    We are mostly talking about native english speakers as well not being able to pass english above a level C.

    I find this odd because international students who come here for university often speak less english than native speakers and are classed as a higher level at speaking / writing english.

    Is this fair? and should Britain step up their game and make these 40% of teenagers pass their basic skills?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articl...hs-and-english
    Your title needs correcting. It's English AND Maths.


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    There are a whole number of reasons such a high number fail, not least that some young people mature later in life. I have to say though I have friends that have failed english and maths and knowing the home life they've had to put up with on a daily basis, they have done well to even make it into school most of the time Despite what they had going on, they were written off by many staff members and that has to contribute to your low motivation to try and do your best. It takes a strong 15-16 year old to be motivated when all around you are writing you off as a lost cause.

    School needs to become better in general at teaching you things you need to know for life, rather than being a factory to churn out potential university graduates. I'm gutted with the one GCSE I didn't get an A* in, yet I will also leave not knowing much about some key things in life.
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    I could say a number of reasons why I got Ds in both Maths and English. Didn't put enough effort truthfully, teacher's weren't the best (weren't bad either), I was doing it while studying at college and I had to juggle at least 7 different subjects with projects due as well as preparing for the exams (Didn't do it in Secondary School since I didn't go) however having Ds in English or Maths doesn't mean that I am not well spoken or a math wiz. And I did find out later on that I am an insanely quick learner at other subjects where I feel more at home. Never disliked learning GCSE English or Maths. Loved Maths since I was a child and still do, and I've always been a heavy reader (slowed down throughout my years).
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    What are your opinions that teenagers do not get a C or above in english or maths?

    We are mostly talking about native english speakers as well not being able to pass english above a level C.

    I find this odd because international students who come here for university often speak less english than native speakers and are classed as a higher level at speaking / writing english.

    Is this fair? and should Britain step up their game and make these 40% of teenagers pass their basic skills?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articl...hs-and-english
    I think under this 40% most of them fall on children of muslim immigrants who value more the Quran than education. Many of them still also do not speak english properly despite being born here.
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    (Original post by slaven)
    I think under this 40% most of them fall on children of muslim immigrants who value more the Quran than education. Many of them still also do not speak english properly despite being born here.
    What?
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    The problem is this conservative thinking that maths and english are important.

    Yes, I am sorry, but if you cannot get a C or above in those two at GCSE level, then you are a bit stupid in the traditional sense.

    But that does not mean you have zero talents and nothing to offer. Education should be much more targeted towards the individual strengths of children, rather than a one fits all style.

    So what if a kid can't do numbers very well or science? It's not like forcing them to sit through those classes is doing anything, not like they understand or care. But they might have an interest in arts, or sports or working with their hands, or working with people, or IT. By forcing kids to learn something they are not interested in and not good at, you piss them off and make them feel stupid and unmotivated. I am not saying cut those classes completely for these kids, but keep it to a basic minimum, and let them focus more on their skills and interests.
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    There's a various amount of reasons as to why various people do not acquire a pass. This could be because of home life, many people I know lost someone tragically close to them right before GCSE's and so you can understand why they wouldn't come out of it with the best grade they had the potential of achieving, but even how you raise your kids will be a defining factor as they'll follow in the parents footsteps, many people local to me are 'druggies' and care nout for child's educational future.

    The child's personality could also differ a D grade to a C grade, as they haven't matured, once again this could be down to their parents or perhaps even social media where they see other youths messing about? They do not see reason when it comes to education and therefore do not try. They could even just be bone idle - I've eavesdropped on my conversations where, yes, they plan to go on benefit once they're done with college, and yes, 'like their parents do'.

    Teachers could also play a role with how they construct their lessons. Apart from the 'I don't like my teacher' or 'I hate this subject', it could be just too boring for the, that they consistently loose focus? Maybe they could be a strong hands on learner as the teacher usually only plays to the traditional sense of learning and people who learn differently cannot blossom.

    There could also be a large percentage of disabled people who, to whatever illness, cannot learn and take in information as others can.
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    seems hard to believe. That's almost 1 in 3.
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    Ban their TSR account and bar them from participating in any future referendums or pursuing a career in politics. Thanks
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    Our entire culture and lifestyle is broken

    Eat some cheap sugary cereal,

    then study in a cold concrete block called a school

    then go home and spend 4 hours on your phone and facebook.


    It's depressing and difficult to learn in that environment
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    GCSE English is a bs subject anyway. It doesn't reflect your quality of communication or your literacy - it's all about 'creative writing'.
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    So blessed to be a part of this generation x
 
 
 
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