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    I don't think Economics is competitive outside the magic top ten universities that offer economics. I remember one girl going for an interview at Queen Mary's, and instead of an interview what she got was sales talk about why she should come to Mary's.
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    (Original post by mobbdeeprob)
    So what do you envision yourself doing in 10 years time?
    Academia. Probable research and lecturing, I have no ambition to work in the conventional sense, 9-5's don't do it for me.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    9-5's don't do it for me.
    In which case, surely, investment banking would be perfect for you!
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    (Original post by H&E)
    In which case, surely, investment banking would be perfect for you!
    I don't fancy 9-9 either. :rolleyes: Actually, it's more 24/7, because the company IS your life.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    I don't fancy 9-9 either. :rolleyes: Actually, it's more 24/7, because the company IS your life.
    Indeed, indeed. I notice you've not joined the IB&Finance Society, despite having comfortably more experience of its subject matter than everyone who's joined thus far combined. Ah well.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    Indeed, indeed. I notice you've not joined the IB&Finance Society, despite having comfortably more experience of its subject matter than everyone who's joined thus far combined. Ah well.
    I can't think of anything more boring than finance, except maybe accounting or book keeping. Microeconomics is very tedious in general, having a diluted version for a job dosen't appeal to me.

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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Academia. Probable research and lecturing, I have no ambition to work in the conventional sense, 9-5's don't do it for me.
    Amen

    Now it's just the small matter of putting in a good performance in the undergrad degree in order to give myself the oppurtunity*

    Oh and I must say there is an impressive amount of self love going on in this thread. Kudos.

    *Learning to spell might also come in handy
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    (Original post by kildare)
    Oh and I must say their is an impressive amount of self love going on in this thread. Kudos.

    lol true
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    I don't think Economics is competitive outside the magic top ten universities that offer economics. I remember one girl going for an interview at Queen Mary's, and instead of an interview what she got was sales talk about why she should come to Mary's.

    Very little is comeptitive outside the top 10-15. Almost every interview outside, sometimes even within, this cohort of universities is a 'sales talk'.
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    i thought the nawaz imam econ ps was pretty good
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    (Original post by PrincessParadox)
    i thought the nawaz imam econ ps was pretty good
    agreed
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    (Original post by TheWolf)
    agreed
    I have something to ask about that personal statement...

    Whilst searching groups.google for economics (in particular alt.uk.a-levels) I found the following thread created by someone under the name of 'Philip Jackson':

    http://economicsps.notlong.com

    Personal Statement looks familiar huh?

    Well as the guys quite clearly developed the personal statement from a quite awful one into something slightly better so I assume that its his own work.

    But its the same as Nawaz Imam's one!

    Who's plagiarizing who? Is Nawaz Imam the same person as Philip Jackson ??

    I'm confused. :confused:
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    It's a very average personal statement, I don't know why people think it's so great; I certainly wouldn't (if I was an Adnissions Tutor) think this candidate was of any great quality, just that he knows who to use a dictionary. :rolleyes: What he said could be put in 20 lines max.
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    Dude!

    Some friends of mine have just been discussing this topic, and here you come and give even more fuel for the fire!

    I mean check this out:

    Student one (me):
    Conditional: Aston(econ), warwick(econ)
    Unconditional: Bath (econ)

    Student two:
    Unsuccesful: Bath(econ), LSE (econ)
    Conditional: warwick(econ)

    Student three:
    Unsuccesful: Bath(econ)
    conditional: LSE(econ)
    Unconditional: Warwick(econ)

    Since LSE is a very respected uni (especially for economics), how come student three was rejected from bath? While I was rejected from LSE but got a (believe it or not) an unconditional?
    We all had pretty much the same grades.

    I know it may all be about personal statements and other anomalities, but this is just too wacked. May this be lottery after all?

    But here is one possibility: I wrote a frank, funny and even whacked personal statement (we're talking stuff like "...ponder about the name of the plastic end of shoelaces..."). This seemed to have appealed to Bath, while LSE were probably disgusted.

    Any other ideas?

    N.B. All of the three examples were IB students.
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    (Original post by Willywonko)
    Since LSE is a very respected uni (especially for economics), how come student three was rejected from bath?
    Because universities have the right to give offer to whoever they want? Just because you get an offer from LSE dosen't mean every other university must accept you. Universities have their often selection criteria, it isn't standardised; that means it's possible for one to give you an offer and another to reject you.
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    (Original post by BazTheMoney)
    Because universities have the right to give offer to whoever they want? Just because you get an offer from LSE dosen't mean every other university must accept you. Universities have their often selection criteria, it isn't standardised; that means it's possible for one to give you an offer and another to reject you.
    Yes, of course. But one would expect that more prestigeous schools (like LSE) would accept students which is considered "good", i.e. good grades, personal statements etc. Every school will prioritise different things, of course, but in the end it all comes down to the same things. So logically, wouldn't it sound logical that a well respected school (e.g. cambridge, LSE, Oxford) would accept "good" students, whom which is also desired by other not-as-fancy schools (e.g. Bath, Warwick). How come then that one received a conditional offer at LSE whilst and another was rejected at LSE but got an unconditional at Bath? My point is that there might be something fishy going on in the selection process...
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    (Original post by Willywonko)
    Yes, of course. But one would expect that more prestigeous schools (like LSE) would accept students which is considered "good", i.e. good grades, personal statements etc. Every school will prioritise different things, of course, but in the end it all comes down to the same things. So logically, wouldn't it sound logical that a well respected school (e.g. cambridge, LSE, Oxford) would accept "good" students, whom which is also desired by other not-as-fancy schools (e.g. Bath, Warwick). How come then that one received a conditional offer at LSE whilst and another was rejected at LSE but got an unconditional at Bath? My point is that there might be something fishy going on in the selection process...
    Not at all. Bath isn't much worse than LSE, and they're certainly good enough to rejected any student they wish. Maybe LSE are the ones that made the mistake in giving the offer, we don't know.

    And it's very misguided to consider every LSE student "good", there are some very average ones.
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    (Original post by deianra)
    Case Study 1:
    School: State
    GCSEs: 10A*s
    ASs: AAAA
    Extra-curricular: A reasonable amount.
    Rejected: Cambridge, UCL, Nottingham, Warwick, Bristol and Exeter
    Accepted: None

    Case Study 2:
    School: State
    GCSEs: 8 A*s, 1 A, B (D&T)
    ASs: AAAA
    Extra-curricular: Young Enterprise, Millennium Volunteers, part time job, 1st XII Lacrosse, Violin (Grade 8)
    Rejected: Cambridge, LSE, Nottingham, Warwick, Bristol and Manchester
    Accepted: None

    Case Study 3:
    School: State
    GCSEs: 5A*s, 5A's.
    ASs: AAAA
    Extra-curricular: CSLA, excellent dancer, school council, prom committee
    Rejected: Oxford (E&M), Nottingham, Warwick, York, Bristol and Durham.
    Accepted: None
    This is insane. Back in the day (i.e. 2001/2) if you had a few A*s at GCSE and were predicted AAB you'd be likely to have no problems getting 5 offers (everywhere except Oxbridge). With AABB at AS including a B in Maths, no Economics and hardly any extracurriculars, I had offers from LSE etc for Economics dual honour courses. Something's gone wrong when Manchester, Exeter etc are rejecting star pupils. It's becoming more of a lottery with increasing numbers pushing the right buttons - straight As, Young Enterprise etc etc, making it difficult to differentiate between talented people.
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    Absolutely great post, having had pretty bad luck with my economics applications due to a lack of maths past GCSE's it is good to see more people are being made aware of how competitive the subject is at degree level.
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    Economics is not alone in being a lottery subject at top unis. These case studies sound disturbing but I bet there are oens like this for toher subjects. Law, Medicine and probably the worst of all, Veterinary Medicine. For Vet Medicine, you can only apply to 4 unis, there are only 6 Vet schools (Cambridge, London, Liverpool, Bristol, Glasgow and Edinburgh) and all 6 of them are hideously oversubscribed to the point where candidates who ahve straight A*'s at GCSE, 4 or 5 A grades at A-level (most or all sciences) and years of relevant work experience are having problems being getting an interview, never mind being offered a place.

    The Lottery comes because A-levels are not differentiating as well as they used to. I don't think norm referencing should come back in, because the IB (International Baccalaureate) differentiates very well between applicants and does not use a norm referencing system. However, A-levels need to be able to differentiate better than they are currently doing at the minute. Whether they are easier or not is not relevant, the differentiating is the problem.
 
 
 
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