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27% of young people (under 25) voted to Leave - has anyone met any of these 27%? watch

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    (Original post by Fenice)
    I would be interested to know what leads you to believe that while the EU - a leviathan conglomerate of 28 member states each nurturing different interests and collectively totalling over 500 million people and employing god knows how many others, 10,000 of whom are paid more than our Prime Minister - is reformable the British Parliament is not.
    Mainly because there is a lot of public opinion which would favour EU reform but barely any public scrutiny of UK reform in the UK - in fact if you ask for it the Sun will probably call you a traitor. Also because the EU is still a young, nascent polity, its constitution has been evolving rapidly over the past 50 if not 25 years.

    Why are you surprised that a bigger polity has more higher paid bureaucrats in it? To the extent that the EU is a united polity it needs fewer bureaucrats, which might be why there are 10x less of them than in the UK and that serving 8x the population. What this means is that they can be paid more.

    The size itself is no bad thing, see USA, Russia, China, even India and Brazil. All economies that are both successful internally and have external clout have hundreds of millions of people in.
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    (Original post by Fenice)
    The powers of the Lords are extremely limited in recognition of this fact. They can reject legislation for a short-term period only and have limited powers to amend it. They have a similar level of power in Parliament as British MEPs do in the EU; the only difference is that we have got that balance of power between the elected and the unelected the right way around; the Lords is so subservient to the Commons that Parliament is essentially a unicameral legislature. Whatever your opinion on the Lords the two set-ups are completely dissimilar.
    Yes, but your point was that the law makers are now accountable. They are now more accountable, they are still a long way from being in a position where they will actually be held accountable. Come general election day how many average voters will remember actions or even know the way their MP has voted over the last 5 years? They'll vote because they don't like corbyn or because their independent MP has come up with some fluff piece. Real accountability of law makers is a pipe dream that wouldn't even be achieved in a world of educated, perfectly informed people let alone in our world.
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    (Original post by dean01234)
    Yes, but your point was that the law makers are now accountable. They are now more accountable, they are still a long way from being in a position where they will actually be held accountable.
    I disagree. I think de facto our law makers are now accountable full stop because of the relative impotency of the Lords, but even if you think it is only a partial victory it is a victory nonetheless.

    Come general election day how many average voters will remember actions or even know the way their MP has voted over the last 5 years? They'll vote because they don't like corbyn or because their independent MP has come up with some fluff piece. Real accountability of law makers is a pipe dream that wouldn't even be achieved in a world of educated, perfectly informed people let alone in our world.
    You seem to be confusing democratic accountability with having a well-informed electorate
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    (Original post by Fenice)

    You seem to be confusing democratic accountability with having a well-informed electorate
    I see it as being the same thing, theoretical accountability is worth jack **** if it won't actually be put into practice.
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    I've not just met one - I am one.

    I voted out for a few reasons. My understanding is that the EU is a sinking ship economically, which I attended an excellent talk on. Moreover I believe the reason the UK was not hit as hard as many parts of the EU by the recession (Greece, Spain) is because of its relative devolution from the EU already and the retention of our currency.

    With this said, I have been led to believe by people better versed in the subject than I that the EU is doomed anyway. Whilst there may have been some (completely overexaggerated) economic fallout from the decision to leave now I believe we'd have got it in the end anyway, and it is better to leave early. On the whole, the people who use the stock market as a barometer for this need to realise that it is utterly meaningless to the vast majority of people. In addition leaving early enables us to get out of certain unfavourable situations, such as the proposed EU army and more dangerous countries being enabled free movement into an area including the UK.

    In terms of immigration, I am in favour of it so long as it is controlled. I count among my friends many people from a variety of different backgrounds and circumstances. On the other hand, I have seen first hand the potential dangers of it especially from lack of integration. In my hometown certain nationalities have carved out streets and territories, and you can (and do) get people beaten up simply for which part of Eastern Europe they come from.

    Seeing as background is so important to you in the OP, I recently finished my 3rd year of Mathematics at Cambridge.
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    I am a Maths graduate from Imperial and voted to leave. Too many powers had been handed to Brussels over trade, agriculture, fisheries etc. It was about democracy for me, not nationalism.
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    (Original post by DJMayes)
    Moreover I believe the reason the UK was not hit as hard as many parts of the EU by the recession (Greece, Spain) is because of its relative devolution from the EU already and the retention of our currency.
    I think thats a huge stretch, it gave us control of monetary policy which will have helped a bit. But both Spain and Greece had massive pre-existing issues, the housing bubble and public debt respectively. The UK fared better for the same simple reason that France and Germany fared better, we're stronger economies.
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    I've not met a single one.

    Anyone under 25 care to own up why you did it and what is your background (granduate, unemployed, location) - Give us a clue..

    Biggest leave voting areas Boston and Great Yarmouth.
    Any young people from those town? Gut feeling is they are not particularly poor areas - pretty average.

    cheers FredOrJohn
    let's see I voted leave and
    I'm 21
    self-employed in the jewellery trade
    from a wealthy part of west kent
    and i voted leave over the borders and got 2 Rolexes, a Lalique and a merc out of it
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    I've tracked FredOrJohn down
    Spoiler:
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    (Original post by FredOrJohn)
    I've not met a single one.

    Anyone under 25 care to own up why you did it and what is your background (granduate, unemployed, location) - Give us a clue..

    Biggest leave voting areas Boston and Great Yarmouth.
    Any young people from those town? Gut feeling is they are not particularly poor areas - pretty average.

    cheers FredOrJohn
    I am in the Under 25 category and i voted leave, I can actually prove it as i took a picture of my ballot paper. I am from an area called Sandwell, one of the most poor boroughs and one of the most over populated. In my area Remain could have doubled their vote and still not equaled leave. I am 19 years old -educated to Alevel standard, and have a job on around £15k a year so you can't really say i have done bad for myself so far. I voted leave because the immigration issue, I accept the EU is average for trading- free trade being its best attribute. However if you think we import more than what we export to the EU meaning that we are trading at a loss with them of around 13 billion pounds. If you think of it as a corporate point of view for every £1 the EU spends on us we spend £1.54 on them. That is why i think we can do better, It is obvious because we are in trade deficit with the EU that they will not bomb us out, we will get a tailored deal, free trade without free movement- the EU will accept this within time, the EU is a project to control 27 countries through a currency and a dictatorship of rules (Only able to have a trade deal with EU). I tell you why immigration bothers me when i was growing up 79.7% of Sandwell was White British (Our people) compared with 65.8% in 2011. The population increased by 25,000 between 2001 and 2011, the amount of White British has gone down in our demographic, and i noticed that without even googling for specific statistics there is about 100 different nationalities on my estate when you may have had 10 when i was about 5/6 there are many many Polish people in our area, they eat fish out of the pools which is actually illegal
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    I voted Leave and I am 18 years of age. I know at least 2 other 6th form peers who also voted Leave, out of about 4 people I actually asked.
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    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)

    Times, they always a changin'.
    How did you think ending your post with that line was a good idea? Help me understand the thought process,
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    I've met a couple of people around age 19/20 who voted leave. They said they thought it made more sense economically. I disagree, but that's democracy- they had certainly thought through their own views, so can't say fairer than that
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    I know one young person in my sixth form who I talk to who voted to leave.

    The majority voted to remain though.
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    Section Leader
    The view that most young people didn't turnout to vote was wrong:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=4206990
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    (Original post by midnightice)
    Hey
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    I think we would have remained if David Cameron kept his mouth shut about he'd quit if we decided to leave.

    Some people saw that as an excuse to throw David Cameron out. We just lost 20% of our net worth and we haven't even left yet. As soon as we leave the EU, I think the pound will drop even more.
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    (Original post by Drunq)
    I think we would have remained if David Cameron kept his mouth shut about he'd quit if we decided to leave.

    Some people saw that as an excuse to throw David Cameron out. We just lost 20% of our net worth and we haven't even left yet. As soon as we leave the EU, I think the pound will drop even more.
    Uh, no. He denied he would resign if the vote was Leave.
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    A lot of them on my facebook feed.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Uh, no. He denied he would resign if the vote was Leave.
    He did deny it, however it was obvious that parties would force him out, because they pressured him into calling a referendum. Everyone saw this coming.
 
 
 
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