Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Faboba)
    Uh... hate to be drawing conclusions based on your username but are one or both of your parents from a Tamil speaking part of India?
    yep

    well almost
    dads from tamil speaking part and mum was born there but her family speaks another language from a neighboring region.

    im surprised u got that from my name :P its from sanskrit (but theres a similar word in tamil though)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by visesh)
    yep

    well almost
    dads from tamil speaking part and mum was born there but her family speaks another language from a neighboring region.

    im surprised u got that from my name :P its from sanskrit (but theres a similar word in tamil though)
    While I'd love to be able to claim an advanced knowledge of the languages ( and names ) of the Indian sub-continent I made an educated guess because it sounded like an 'Indian' word. I have a curious inability to wrap my head around long words in languages other than English ( German being the worst example ) which makes Sanskrit names almost impossible for me to get right without having to have a long, slow ponder over them.

    I've recently ( just last week in fact ) finished the 'Very Short Introduction to Indian Philosophy' ( yet another great book from the VSI series, how I love it ) and it finally brought home to me the fact I have real problems with polysyllabic foreign words.

    (Original post by Faboba)
    While I'd love to be able to claim an advanced knowledge of the languages ( and names ) of the Indian sub-continent I made an educated guess because it sounded like an 'Indian' word. I have a curious inability to wrap my head around long words in languages other than English ( German being the worst example ) which makes Sanskrit names almost impossible for me to get right without having to have a long, slow ponder over them.

    I've recently ( just last week in fact ) finished the 'Very Short Introduction to Indian Philosophy' ( yet another great book from the VSI series, how I love it ) and it finally brought home to me the fact I have real problems with polysyllabic foreign words.

    the only word i know in sanskrit is "samsara" (hope tat's right)

    you can just imagine the applications

    How do I get to the post office? oohh........samsara

    and also it's a kind of shoe.in english. not in sanskrit.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by crana)
    the only word i know in sanskrit is "samsara" (hope tat's right)

    you can just imagine the applications

    How do I get to the post office? oohh........samsara

    and also it's a kind of shoe.in english. not in sanskrit.
    Most of the 'eastern philosophy' words are either sanskrit or pali too; dharma, karma, sutra, brahma, dukkha etc. As far as modern / practical Sanskrit goes I haven't the foggiest.

    Am I right in thinking Pali is dead?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    i think pali is an extinct language now. does samsara mean "family" or "relations"? (thats what it means in tamil :rolleyes: ) (EDIT: means endless wandering in a spiritual sort of way acc to crana)

    my knowledge of sanskrit ends with a 5 line mantra that i recite daily i think. i might know more but that would be accidental.


    my mum did quite a bit of sanskrit philosophy at an institute in chennai (thats madras to most ppl ) while at college and uni. the Swami Vivekanada institute (he might be in that book u were reading faboba)
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shiny)
    I am linguistically challenged
    Everyone has the capability to learn languages, they're just taught badly in this country. Did you know that in the Swiss canton of Valais/Wallis, only 2% of 20 year olds do not speak a second language fluently? :eek:

    Makes my reasonable German pale into insignificance
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    Everyone has the capability to learn languages, they're just taught badly in this country. Did you know that in the Swiss canton of Valais/Wallis, only 2% of 20 year olds do not speak a second language fluently? :eek:

    Makes my reasonable German pale into insignificance
    In Finland, children have to learn Finnish, Swedish, and at least one other language. In fact, most non-English-speaking countries have a more positive outlook on foreign languages than English-speaking ones.

    I know someone who plans on working in the film industry...he's got a job doing odd jobs for a film crew in Japan. I asked him if he was planning on picking up any Japanese, but he said quite cheerfully and honestly that he was planning on speaking to everyone in English, wherever his job took him. The thing is, because of English's power in the world today, he can get away with it most of the time. It's sad really.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Squishy)
    In Finland, children have to learn Finnish, Swedish, and at least one other language. In fact, most non-English-speaking countries have a more positive outlook on foreign languages than English-speaking ones.

    I know someone who plans on working in the film industry...he's got a job doing odd jobs for a film crew in Japan. I asked him if he was planning on picking up any Japanese, but he said quite cheerfully and honestly that he was planning on speaking to everyone in English, wherever his job took him. The thing is, because of English's power in the world today, he can get away with it most of the time. It's sad really.

    In the Irish Free State, all children have to learn Irish and English from 4-18... Explain to me, therefore, why there appear to be practically no Irish speakers in the country outside the Occupied Territories (where Irish is not compulsary) and the Gaeltacht areas where people speak it to get great big grants and stuff???
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Squishy)
    In Finland, children have to learn Finnish, Swedish, and at least one other language. In fact, most non-English-speaking countries have a more positive outlook on foreign languages than English-speaking ones.

    I know someone who plans on working in the film industry...he's got a job doing odd jobs for a film crew in Japan. I asked him if he was planning on picking up any Japanese, but he said quite cheerfully and honestly that he was planning on speaking to everyone in English, wherever his job took him. The thing is, because of English's power in the world today, he can get away with it most of the time. It's sad really.
    I know, it depresses me how people feel they can just get around by forcing people to speak our language. I have always tried to pick up a bit of the language of the country I'm in (although my amazing Spanish whilst in Mexico was generally limited to "How much is that?" "That's too expensive, I'll give you....") and while of course I appreciate locals learning English, I don't feel that they should have to, we should at least make an effort.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by visesh)
    i think pali is an extinct language now. does samsara mean "family" or "relations"? (thats what it means in tamil :rolleyes: ) (EDIT: means endless wandering in a spiritual sort of way acc to crana)

    my knowledge of sanskrit ends with a 5 line mantra that i recite daily i think. i might know more but that would be accidental.


    my mum did quite a bit of sanskrit philosophy at an institute in chennai (thats madras to most ppl ) while at college and uni. the Swami Vivekanada institute (he might be in that book u were reading faboba)
    He certainly is. It's mostly about the history of philosophy in India so there's a lot of ground to cover but he gets mentioned towards the end in a fairly mixed portrayal ( not all good, not all bad ) as the man who brought Indian philosophy to the west and in doing so brought about a renaissance among Indian thinkers - as something of a reaction to western interference - but also the man who took it upon himself to portray his group's views as the 'orthodox' beliefs of India when most of them were a radical step from what had been followed for the centuries before.

    Impressive chap though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Helenia)
    I know, it depresses me how people feel they can just get around by forcing people to speak our language. I have always tried to pick up a bit of the language of the country I'm in (although my amazing Spanish whilst in Mexico was generally limited to "How much is that?" "That's too expensive, I'll give you....") and while of course I appreciate locals learning English, I don't feel that they should have to, we should at least make an effort.
    Hee hee. I once attended a... thing... at the European Parliament for senior high school students across Europe. One of the exercises involved answering obscure multiple choice questions about the EU in one of the 11 languages ( as in... like... 3 questions in English, 2 in Finnish, 3 in French etc. Not just all in an arbitrary language ). You were to find yourself a group of four from different countries and have a bash at it but it turned into a bit of a farce because in my group there was;

    A Scottish boy ( uh.. me ) that spoke English and French
    A Swedish girl that spoke English and Swedish
    A French girl that spoke French and English
    An Italian girl that spoke Italian and French.

    Obvously the common language we went with was English but it meant that I had to keep translating into bad French what we were saying for the Italian - the French girl didn't really feel a need to. In the end we sort of gave up and started trading answers with the Germans and Portugeuse.

    It's scary how fluent in English a lot of foreigners are but it's largely a side effect of American TV IMHO. While in most countries a lot of TV does get translated it's easy enough to get untranslated stuff if you want it. Can't forget the episode of Monty Python in German... that just blew me away
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I was at a thing at Stirling uni a few years ago celebrating the International Year of Languages. Got picked to be part of a group to do Who Wants to be a Millionaire? with each question in a different language. It was quite difficult, but interestingly enough, the question we had the most problem with was in Gaelic. Russian, Greek no problem. But a language from our own country....ooh the challenge .
    I also learnt a bit of Romanian that day (we had to go to workshops and things) and got interviewed on radio Scotland speaking Romanian .

    (Original post by Faboba)
    I've recently ( just last week in fact ) finished the 'Very Short Introduction to Indian Philosophy' ( yet another great book from the VSI series, how I love it )
    I just bought one of them.
    My mum's studied a little sanskrit (she's a polyglot)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acaila)
    I was at a thing at Stirling uni a few years ago celebrating the International Year of Languages. Got picked to be part of a group to do Who Wants to be a Millionaire? with each question in a different language. It was quite difficult, but interestingly enough, the question we had the most problem with was in Gaelic. Russian, Greek no problem. But a language from our own country....ooh the challenge .
    I also learnt a bit of Romanian that day (we had to go to workshops and things) and got interviewed on radio Scotland speaking Romanian .

    Sounds fun, remember to invite me next time!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Hehe I'll be long gone by then
    I'll tell you about it when you buy a drink in Cam How's that?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acaila)
    Hehe I'll be long gone by then
    I'll tell you about it when you buy a drink in Cam How's that?
    Tut... I guess so.. but you might have to go all the way to the Girton bar for me to get it for you!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Only if you pay for the taxi
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acaila)
    Only if you pay for the taxi
    Taxi??? From Cambridge to Girton..? Try intercity train (or maybe flying)!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Pfft you're still paying. And I won't be flying Ryanair! Too bumpy
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Acaila)
    Pfft you're still paying. And I won't be flying Ryanair! Too bumpy
    Never been with Ryanair... Don't like the sound of them!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Flew with them a couple of times last summer and all the landings were nasty
 
 
 
Poll
Who is most responsible for your success at university

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.