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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Even so, the ability - as a westerner - to speak fluent Chinese is one of the most desirable skills in modern business.
    I'll give you your first lesson for free. Chinese isn't a language.
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    (Original post by Jjj90)
    It will lead to nowhere unless you want to be a history teacher, a history lecturer, work in museums, in archaeology, in archives, in journalism, in publishing, if you want to write about history, if you want to be an author etc etc etc. Saying "it won't lead anywhere" is entirely dependent on what your career goals are!
    Or working in law, finance, consulting, government etc etc
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    It seems that I am constantly reading threads which bundle together 'Art' and 'STEM' degrees and proceed to label one as unquestionably useless and the other as a path to riches. I imagine that most of the users on this website are still in education and thus have a limited knowledge about the world of work, myself included. As someone who is undecided in what degree to pursue, I have long debated studying history or law at university to no avail. I will (hopefully) be aiming to "top" unis, e.g. Oxbridge, St. Andrews, Durham. It seems that I am constantly confused by the conflicting arguments on this website and other forums.
    On one hand, I have someone telling me that history is a useless 'liberal arts' degree, for 'lazy' people who can't handle STEM degrees, and will therefore end up unemployed, a virgin at 40 and on anti-depressants. Some also take the position that law is not on the level of these useless liberal arts, but a slight step above, nearer the pinnacle of academia which is the almighty STEM (though not quite reaching it). They emphasise how all the top positions in professions are occupied almost entirely by STEM graduates and how any liberal arts graduate is merely a benefactor of Daddy's nepotism. Furthermore, if your arts degree is not form Oxbridge, you may as well dig yourself a grave and swallow cement.
    Yet, on the other hand I have people telling me that history is a very well respected degree, easily 'on the level' of subjects such as economics and maths. They tell me how many of Britain's top executives have degrees such as English and History, and how the subjects teach the student how to think laterally and critically. Often it is stated how history graduates occupy the top positions in law, banking, journalism and politics. They say how most jobs do not require a specific degree, the classification and CV are far more important. In relation to law, which I am also considering studying, they state how a graduate can simply do the GDL and therefore make themselves a competitive applicant for a legal position.
    It is honestly impossible for someone like me to distinguish between who is right and who is wrong. The two groups of people contradict each other almost constantly, and when I read threads like this I just don't know who to believe. I am interested in a career in law or finance, but to be frank I am constantly changing my mind and so I am not certain on anything - this is why history appeals to me, it is flexible. In my opinion (which doesn't count for much, as I admit I know very little) I think people should do what they are 'passionate' about - but within reason. Furthermore, it is ridiculous to separate 'art' and 'STEM', for me the two are intertwined and more similar than people think - I believe Steve Jobs spoke a lot about this. My Dad is a doctor, and despite what people think about the profession, he absolutely hates it. It's stressful, most patients are an absolute nightmare and the regulations medical practitioners face now are just ridiculous. He flat out told me not to consider a medical degree. And yet, he was a very talented musician when he was younger, but he chose to study medicine instead as he knew it would lead to stable employment. He does not regret this. Unfortunately, I do think some degrees have little real world use and that is why you have to follow your passion within reason.
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    (Original post by Jjj90)
    It will lead to nowhere unless you want to be a history teacher, a history lecturer, work in museums, in archaeology, in archives, in journalism, in publishing, if you want to write about history, if you want to be an author etc etc etc. Saying "it won't lead anywhere" is entirely dependent on what your career goals are!
    Or law, consulting, finance, general management, marketing.....

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    (Original post by Oddwatermelon)
    It seems that I am constantly reading threads which bundle together 'Art' and 'STEM' degrees and proceed to label one as unquestionably useless and the other as a path to riches. I imagine that most of the users on this website are still in education and thus have a limited knowledge about the world of work, myself included. As someone who is undecided in what degree to pursue, I have long debated studying history or law at university to no avail. I will (hopefully) be aiming to "top" unis, e.g. Oxbridge, St. Andrews, Durham. It seems that I am constantly confused by the conflicting arguments on this website and other forums.
    On one hand, I have someone telling me that history is a useless 'liberal arts' degree, for 'lazy' people who can't handle STEM degrees, and will therefore end up unemployed, a virgin at 40 and on anti-depressants. Some also take the position that law is not on the level of these useless liberal arts, but a slight step above, nearer the pinnacle of academia which is the almighty STEM (though not quite reaching it). They emphasise how all the top positions in professions are occupied almost entirely by STEM graduates and how any liberal arts graduate is merely a benefactor of Daddy's nepotism. Furthermore, if your arts degree is not form Oxbridge, you may as well dig yourself a grave and swallow cement.
    Yet, on the other hand I have people telling me that history is a very well respected degree, easily 'on the level' of subjects such as economics and maths. They tell me how many of Britain's top executives have degrees such as English and History, and how the subjects teach the student how to think laterally and critically. Often it is stated how history graduates occupy the top positions in law, banking, journalism and politics. They say how most jobs do not require a specific degree, the classification and CV are far more important. In relation to law, which I am also considering studying, they state how a graduate can simply do the GDL and therefore make themselves a competitive applicant for a legal position.
    It is honestly impossible for someone like me to distinguish between who is right and who is wrong. The two groups of people contradict each other almost constantly, and when I read threads like this I just don't know who to believe. I am interested in a career in law or finance, but to be frank I am constantly changing my mind and so I am not certain on anything - this is why history appeals to me, it is flexible. In my opinion (which doesn't count for much, as I admit I know very little) I think people should do what they are 'passionate' about - but within reason. Furthermore, it is ridiculous to separate 'art' and 'STEM', for me the two are intertwined and more similar than people think - I believe Steve Jobs spoke a lot about this. My Dad is a doctor, and despite what people think about the profession, he absolutely hates it. It's stressful, most patients are an absolute nightmare and the regulations medical practitioners face now are just ridiculous. He flat out told me not to consider a medical degree. And yet, he was a very talented musician when he was younger, but he chose to study medicine instead as he knew it would lead to stable employment. He does not regret this. Unfortunately, I do think some degrees have little real world use and that is why you have to follow your passion within reason.
    Simple: the former group is a bunch of 17 year olds on TSR with nothing better to do than spout ignorance, the other is giving you actual careers advice.

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    Feel like people just assume that if a degree doesn't lead to a specific career it's a 'bad' degree. Ignorance...
    If everyone did all STEM and whatever else you associate as 'good' degrees then you would have an over-saturated pool of STEM graduates who are still completing for a limited amount of jobs... people obtaining degrees with different skill sets is a good thing!
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    (Original post by Ashleyclaire)
    What about those who do your so-called bad degrees so they can then teach that subject?
    I think you'll find that English teachers are pretty necessary.


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    i Dind off un nan it ass, nevah hurt me
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    so you conservatives supposedly want to let the “free" market into universities, yet dictate what people choose, ok.

    “muh freedom!1!"
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    (Original post by Tsrsarahhhh)
    I guess it's be they don't lead to a job straight away. For example with medicine you know that the student wants to end up as a doctor. His list is stupid and incredibly closed minded. Just be a language or biology doesn't lead to a specific job doesn't mean they're useless.
    What a load of BS. That can be said about most of the subjects on that list and beyond.
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    (Original post by Jjj90)
    Yes, but if someone has identified the way in which Women's Studies can benefit their career then it is a fair choice to make. Stop making this about specific courses, it is no more silly to do a degree in Women's Studies than in Astrophysics or Quantum Mechanics if you want to be an interior designer!

    The difference is that if by chance they decide that they dont want to be an interior designer a degree in astrophysics would probably look a lot more impressive to an employer.You can also do a lot more with that degree than womens studies due to all the highly valued numerical skills.If they decide they dont want to do interior design they could do pretty much anything from genetics to engineering and planetary science due to the transferable skills.With womens studies an employer wont be impressed and they'll probably end up working in mcdonalds or someplace similar.Furthermore they're paying 9 grand a year, astrophysics has a lot more contact hours than womens studies so the comparison is flawed.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    Good
    - Engineering
    - Medicine
    - Dentistry
    - Veterinary Science
    - Mathematics
    - Physics
    - Chemistry
    - Economics
    - Accounting
    - Nursing
    - Computer Science
    - Law

    Bad
    - English
    - History
    - Gender Studies
    - Media Studies
    - Cultural Studies
    - Biology
    - Sociology
    - Psychology
    - Languages
    - Theology
    - Sport Science
    - Business
    - Design

    Business is actually very much in demand. Management skills are still highly desired by companies. Languages is good if you are doing an oriental one. There is a severe lack of Chinese/Japanese/Hindi speaking people in business fields, and its even better if you are familiar with the culture too.Teachers are in insane demand as well.

    Other than that, this seems rather alright overall. Some niche fields like Radiography are consistently seeing employment rates of nearly 100% and is listed as an occupating in shortage in the UK according to the VisaBureau, as are Graphic/Visual designers, but that is just nitpicking.
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    (Original post by Robby2312)
    The difference is that if by chance they decide that they dont want to be an interior designer a degree in astrophysics would probably look a lot more impressive to an employer.You can also do a lot more with that degree than womens studies due to all the highly valued numerical skills.If they decide they dont want to do interior design they could do pretty much anything from genetics to engineering and planetary science due to the transferable skills.With womens studies an employer wont be impressed and they'll probably end up working in mcdonalds or someplace similar.Furthermore they're paying 9 grand a year, astrophysics has a lot more contact hours than womens studies so the comparison is flawed.
    So only astrophysics degrees have 'transferable skills'?

    The interior designer could leverage their creative skills for roles within various creative sectors like advertising, marketing, creative management... They could use their conceptualising skill to work in merchandising, graphic design, their commercial skills to be a buyer..

    Having a 'numerate' degree isn't the only way in life mate.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    So only astrophysics degrees have 'transferable skills'?

    The interior designer could leverage their creative skills for roles within various creative sectors like advertising, marketing, creative management... They could use their conceptualising skill to work in merchandising, graphic design, their commercial skills to be a buyer..

    Having a 'numerate' degree isn't the only way in life mate.

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    I would argue that if you want to be an interior designer then having a degree is probably not the way to go about it.You'd be much better off getting experience within that sector.You cant deny that a lot of these degrees are useless.If you want to work in television getting a degree in film studies is not going to help.Maybe back when degrees were only 3 grand a year you could argue that it doesnt matter what degree people choose as long as they enjoy it but its a lot more expensive now.And its much more of an investment.You have to balance doing something you enjoy with the practical financial side of things.
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    (Original post by Robby2312)
    I would argue that if you want to be an interior designer then having a degree is probably not the way to go about it.You'd be much better off getting experience within that sector.You cant deny that a lot of these degrees are useless.If you want to work in television getting a degree in film studies is not going to help.Maybe back when degrees were only 3 grand a year you could argue that it doesnt matter what degree people choose as long as they enjoy it but its a lot more expensive now.And its much more of an investment.You have to balance doing something you enjoy with the practical financial side of things.
    Or, they can be creative about their options and not get stuck into the traditional thinking that a degree leads to a certain 'pre-set' line of work.

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    Regardless of the degree itself being a 'waste of money' or whatever you want to call it, wouldn't you agree that the actual experience of university life is extremely beneficial to people? E.g. it helps with the transition from childhood to adulthood, gaining independence, its one of the very few opportunities to make friends for life, international exchange programmes, etc the list is endless. So in general, I think that the benefits of the experience alone, will always overshadow the costs. And yes, before someone brings up that there are options other than uni to gain these things, I think most people would agree that nothing can ever compare to the actual university experience.
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    Those people that disagree with this are those that the OP is talking about.

    It's not just a personal matter. People wasting three years at university just to get a piece of paper that makes them more attractive in the labor market, is a huge waste of resources.

    In one sense even, you need a degree, but often it doesn't matter what degree, the paper just matters. So it is understandable for people to pick what they enjoy rather than what is practical or useful.
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    (Original post by dmy15)
    Regardless of the degree itself being a 'waste of money' or whatever you want to call it, wouldn't you agree that the actual experience of university life is extremely beneficial to people? E.g. it helps with the transition from childhood to adulthood, gaining independence, its one of the very few opportunities to make friends for life, international exchange programmes, etc the list is endless. So in general, I think that the benefits of the experience alone, will always overshadow the costs. And yes, before someone brings up that there are options other than uni to gain these things, I think most people would agree that nothing can ever compare to the actual university experience.
    See my post above. Pretty expensive way of transitioning to adulthood...
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    ADVISE
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    QUOTE=Jjj90;66814114]Yes, but if someone has identified the way in which Women's Studies can benefit their career then it is a fair choice to make. Stop making this about specific courses, it is no more silly to do a degree in Women's Studies than in Astrophysics or Quantum Mechanics if you want to be an interior designer![/QUOTE]

    To be fair, WS is a pile of shite. I'd be embarrassed to put that on my CV.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    I think you should have done English instead.
    It's a 'typo, ie a mechanical rather than an orthographic error.

    I think you should finish a degree and get some life experience before attempting to use typing errors as evidence of anything other than typing errors.
 
 
 
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