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    In the 19th century, when children could sell their labour, poor families were essentially like a commodity, subject to the same laws of supply and demand as any other. When there was a great demand for labour, family sizes increased; when an inevitable crash occurred, sizes dropped through starvation and recklessness. In any case, maximising the size of your family was a good investment in your future.

    I think that this culture has subsisted, and poorer families continue to have larger families for the same reason (and a multitude of others of course) or perhaps just unconsciously, like a tradition of sorts. The thing is, if you can only rely on yourself to produce the means of having a larger family (i.e. generate more disposable income) like the OP suggests and you're already on the lowest rung of society, then you're doomed essentially - life becomes like a vicious cycle. Having kids does somewhat give you more opportunity, no?
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    (Original post by NotNotBatman)
    Or can't afford it?
    Another reason, yes. Are contraceptives really so expensive for poor people? I didn't know that.
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    (Original post by Artyom17)
    Is that why it's the working class who work the hardest, do the most difficult jobs and who have given you everything you have available to you from your clothes to your computer ,yet get hardly anything for it? Is that why the working class are pitted at the bottom thanks to capitalism's class system and are constantly exploited for their labour and have to work in poor conditions? Is that why people are born into millions without even doing anything? Yay capitalism and its many contradictions.



    The fact a 'benefits system' as well as things like 'charities' even have to exist in capitalist society shows how poor of a system it really is. It all comes down to unequal distribution of resources. In a true socialist society, 'benefits' would no longer exist, everyone would have work available, everyone would be looked after adequately without having to rely on a pittance. The disabled would no longer be discriminated against economically just for having the misforture of being disabled.

    Aspects of the welfare state were granted thanks to working class struggles won in the past, same with many worker rights, NHS, etc. It's all there thanks to the work of many socialists fighting for things which no capitalist state was granting them.
    Computer programming is on of the highest paid jobs
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    (Original post by Artyom17)
    Is that why it's the working class who work the hardest, do the most difficult jobs and who have given you everything you have available to you from your clothes to your computer ,yet get hardly anything for it? Is that why the working class are pitted at the bottom thanks to capitalism's class system and are constantly exploited for their labour and have to work in poor conditions? Is that why people are born into millions without even doing anything? Yay capitalism and its many contradictions.



    The fact a 'benefits system' as well as things like 'charities' even have to exist in capitalist society shows how poor of a system it really is. It all comes down to unequal distribution of resources. In a true socialist society, 'benefits' would no longer exist, everyone would have work available, everyone would be looked after adequately without having to rely on a pittance. The disabled would no longer be discriminated against economically just for having the misforture of being disabled.

    Aspects of the welfare state were granted thanks to working class struggles won in the past, same with many worker rights, NHS, etc. It's all there thanks to the work of many socialists fighting for things which no capitalist state was granting them.
    (Original post by Wired_1800)
    What is the concept of working hard? I think many people have been brainwashed by this concept and to think that some people are rubbish while others are great.

    For example, you have a bricklayer who works about 60 hours a week (10 hours for 6 days). He performs physical activities of laying bricks for 10 hours every day. He gets paid a "fair" wage of £15 per hour. In a week, he gets £900 (without tax) and in the year, he gets £46,800.

    Another person, a banker, does 60 hours a week as well. His job is not as physical demanding as our bricklayer friend, but he gets paid about £70,000. What is his job, investment banking. He has to look at where the money is and invest it accordingly, thereby making his employer's and their clients more money.

    With your concept of fair wage, is it fair that the bricklayer gets paid more than £20,000 less than the banker, when he does more physical activities and shaves years off his life because of his job?

    The concept that capitalism rewards hard work is not very true. What it does is to widen the gap between those who control the levers of the economy and the wage-slaves.

    A clear example is in the UK, where the powerful people i.e. bankers, consultants and CEOs have earned more in recent years, while the wage-slaves of teachers, civil servants, bus drivers etc have seen their wages stagnate or even reduce. Yet, people claim that we are in a "fair" society. Please wake up!

    The big problem we have today is that many people have this aspirational goal of wanting to reach the top that they will defend a flaw economic system; just because they want it to be there, when they eventually reach there.
    Amazing points.
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    (Original post by AlevelBiologist)
    Computer programming is on of the highest paid jobs
    I’m sorry but that’s really irrelevant to the point that @Artyom17 was trying to make.
 
 
 
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