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    (Original post by Tsrsarahhhh)
    I would say psychology. The amount of people who applied to psychology from my college for this year was massive. I feel like for a lot of people it's a degree that you take if you don't exactly know what to do but you still want to do a science degree and for that reason psychology is oversubscribed.For some jobs however eg psychologist, psychology is necessary.
    Yep, and you can't even practice psychology without further study just like economics.

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    those computing degrees that are lacking in mathematical content.....
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    (Original post by inhuman)
    Anyone who mentions economics but not PPE is very likely to not actually know anything about economics.

    Oh and at OP, management or business studies.
    ...
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    (Original post by BIGJohnson777)
    I have got an A* in A-level econ, and although it isn't comparable to a degree, quite a few of my friends are doing it at a good university and say that you can blow one's head off with a shotgun and he still will have enough mental capacity to get a 2:1 in it.
    Read the post above yours.
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    I actually found Medicine to be a considerably harder degree than Physics, for that very reason. Physics is conceptually more difficult but the volume is manageable, so even if you're struggling to understand things, you have time to work through it and wrap your head around it. Medicine involves memorising such a ridiculous amount of information that I really struggled (and still struggle) to contain it all. There's also the practical and social elements of Clinical Medicine that don't feature in other courses. Sitting down with a difficult equation is a very different challenge to telling a parent that their young child is going to die
    I totally agree with you, I did a hard science degree and wanted to do a grad medicine degree.
    After more investigation and most of my families work in the health industry I do think it is a lot more demanding, considering the amount of time it would take for you to qualify and when you actually start working, it would be a lot harder than working as a scientist as you might be dealing with difficult patients and need to make fast decisions on things that would affect a persons life.

    Had a friend who studied physics and now working in a hospital as a scientist and she's quit twice because of the crazy hours and workload. I think for doctors it would be even worse.
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    (Original post by Tsrsarahhhh)
    I would say psychology. The amount of people who applied to psychology from my college for this year was massive. I feel like for a lot of people it's a degree that you take if you don't exactly know what to do but you still want to do a science degree and for that reason psychology is oversubscribed.For some jobs however eg psychologist, psychology is necessary.
    I bet you couldn't even think of even half the jobs psychology may not be necessary for but is highly valuable sought after.
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    Don't see why medicine is being listed as being the most overrated,even if from an academic perspective it isn't as challenging as physics,99.99% of medical graduates are basically guranteed a job and have good career prospects.Of course other jobs within the healthcare system gurantee you a job but for medicine a very intensive amount of knowledge is required.
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    law
    x1000. law.
    What did you study out of interest?


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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    Most intellectually overrated: medicine by far. A degree where most of the holders consider themselves the cream of the crop but it really is more about memorisation than difficult concepts.


    Rote memorisation...? I think you you are going off first two years here. Medical school tests far greater attributes than that. It tests resilience, it instils the virtues of working hard and organisation and the ability to cope with stress. It tests your ability to prioritise, to delegate, to know your own limits, to explain difficult concepts to patients, to communicate bad news, to rationalise and to justify and to constantly reflect. These things cannot be measured but it would be disingenous to think that they aren't tested. And that's nothing to compare to clinical examination and diagnostic and management skills


    I graduated from a decent medical school. Our intercalators join the third year of vitually any bioscience or biochem bachelors and Masters courses, some even do physics/engineering related...and guess what? Almost without exception they end up with firsts or distinctions. Course directors for these courses hold medical students in high esteem because of a reason.

    You might think that being a healthcare assistant has given you some idea of how tough things are in healthcare but really you have little personal responsiblity for the patient compared to a doctor. From the moment you graduate as a doctor, you are personally responsible for making critical healthcare decision, you ask yourself what if I had done something different, patients may die because of the consequences of your actions and your decisions. When **** hits the fan, guess who deals with it. And then there's the workload...I value what healthcare assistants do but really looking after a bay of 6 patients is very different to being on ward cover during the weekend for 800 odd medical patients which an F1 doctor will probably be from the moment they graduate...and then making decisions about healthcare. You may think you are under stress but try answering 20 bleeps in 30 minutes then prioritising them, then seeing these patients and making decisions.

    So perhaps you have seen from afar the consequences of healthcare and may have lots of life experience, unfortunately this is unlikely to make you a good doctor unless you have the required attributes.

    The question related to over-rated degree...not the most conceptually difficult, which is the trap that a lot of STEM people fall into. Unfortunately, I do think that medicine is over-rated. No one wants to go through over a decade of gruelling postgrad training, getting papers and PhDs and Masters and other memberships and working on quality improvement projects while working 12 hour plus shifts in horrendous understaffed conditions, with little supervision and arbitrary management-led targets often unable to even go to the toilet. If anyone thinks this is some easy way to money, then I think if one directed a similar effort elsewhere perhaps the results could be even better or achieved with less stress.
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    That feel when your starting a PPE degree soon.
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    Most overrated:

    Dentistry: soooo overrated. people do dentistry for the money. no-one can have a passion to check people's teeth surely..

    Law: sooo many law graduates, not enough jobs. no point doing Law at a **** uni.


    Most underrated:

    Philosophy

    Physics
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    Economics.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    My point is, it doesn't matter which degree one does in those fields and maths isn't the 'premier' option for most roles in finance, you may be right that it is indeed the premier option for a few roles

    But anyway, who cares.

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    Maths is exceptional for every job within finance and there are some jobs that can only be done by mathematicians/engineers/chemists..

    Who do you think trading houses hire?
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I know, it is called hyperbole, look it up

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    Haha I wasn't questioning the hyperbole I was questioning the actual sentiment of your point.
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    (Original post by TenthBelt1993)
    Maths is exceptional for every job within finance and there are some jobs that can only be done by mathematicians/engineers/chemists..

    Who do you think trading houses hire?
    yeah, hence 'for some'. Jane Street don't do the same things as a vanilla rates desk at Citi does, most people good with numbers (you don't have to study a numerical degree to be good with numbers) can do the latter but not the former.



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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    No offense, but you don't really know what you're talking about. Classics, prior to PPE (its reboot) was known as 'The Greats'. Unlike all other Oxford BAs, it lasts four years, not three. Why? Because Oxford designed it as the ultimate degree. It is the academics' academic degree, covering the highest level of Ancient Greek, Latin, Ancient Literature, Ancient History and Philosophy in the country. Naturally, only a select few are accepted, and only a few apply (unlike any other subject, the application pool is whittled down from age 11 to 18 - so only the brightest minds apply for it at university). Just look at the civil service (MOD, FCO etc.), all the most senior positions are dominated by Literae Humaniores graduates.
    Hahahahahhahahahahahhahhahahaha

    (I did Greek and Latin up to A-Level)

    I graduated from Oxford, please see the 2.2 rate in Classics vs the 2.2 rate in the sciences.

    Most classicists don't work that hard and can just choose the 'soft' options as they can from their course. (All of the philosphy modules that are in english rather than greek/latin). They just skip the difficult language work and do philosophy papers where they are guaranteed at least a 2.1.

    Please only talk about stuff you know...
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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    If you'd read what I said carefully, you'd have seen that I mention how the pool of graduates is whittled down. Latin is bloody hard, Ancient Greek is... Have you seen ancient greek? For A level not only are there a few thousand words of vocab to learn, reels of grammar tables to memorise and pages of literaure to know off by heart, it doesn't even use our letters for god's sake. As such, the number of people doing classic languages is whittled down and down and down. How many people do you know doing both Latin and Ancient Greek A Level? Exactly. They have 200 applications because there are only 200 people in the country good enough, and they have 100 places to fill, hence the high acceptance ratio. And, no, with a BA Oxon in Classics, doors open for you in MC Law firms, investment banks, the top levels of the Civil Service, programming, accountancy... The works. Perhaps you couldn't be an engineer or a doctor. That's about it. Why am I even arguing for this? It's a degree for members of the ruling class to assert their dominance with. Perhaps they're secretly happy that people like you don't even know what they're up to.

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    Hahahahha you are such an idiot.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    yeah, hence 'for some'. Jane Street don't do the same things as a vanilla rates desk at Citi does, most people good with numbers (you don't have to study a numerical degree to be good with numbers) can do the latter but not the former.



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    So can you just confirm:

    With Maths you can get any finance role.

    With almost all other degrees certain quantitive avenues are closed.

    As such Maths is the best degree to get into finance.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    How is learning galois theorem ever going to help you balance a financial statement? Or set up a very simple DCF model that a 12 year old could probably set up?

    Finance is quite helpful actually.
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    Mostly correct. Although it sometimes depends on what type of field you're heading into in finance. Mathematicians have a marked advantage when it comes to understanding stochastic analysis and more mathematically demanding prerequisites.

    Plus, stop putting down Galois Theory! Wonderful subject
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    (Original post by TenthBelt1993)
    So can you just confirm:

    With Maths you can get any finance role.

    With almost all other degrees certain quantitive avenues are closed.

    As such Maths is the best degree to get into finance.
    #logic

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