British universities vs Dutch universities

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    (Original post by jneill)
    Is rubbish.



    There will be no issue for a British citizen getting a job in the UK with a Dutch degree.
    I thought not. If anything don't employers like it that you decided to take the plunge for going abroad for undergraduate studies?
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    I thought not. If anything don't employers like it that you decided to take the plunge for going abroad for undergraduate studies?
    Yes they do. Seeing a candidate that has pushed themselves and done something out of their comfort zone is "a good thing".

    The IELTS thing is completely irrelevant, you are a British citizen so it doesn't apply. And Dutch universities are well respected internationally.

    If you want to go for it - do so. There's many students now applying to Dutch and other EU universities. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-34721679). I'd just chuck in the idea of looking at Ireland too (also cheap, although accomodation in Dublin can be expensive).
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Yes they do. Seeing a candidate that has pushed themselves and done something out of their comfort zone is "a good thing".

    The IELTS thing is completely irrelevant, you are a British citizen so it doesn't apply. And Dutch universities are well respected internationally.

    If you want to go for it - do so. There's many students now applying to Dutch and other EU universities. I'd just chuck in the idea of looking at Ireland too (also cheap, although accomodation in Dublin can be expensive).
    On top of that my course offers internships and publishing houses and I learn Dutch, Italian or Swedish.
    I looked at Queens in Belfast and I think that was £9k a year too. I think I'd rather go for the Netherlands. I looked at other European countries but I liked the Netherlands the most.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Main differences is that her friends weren't British and did their degrees abroad. I'm British.


    Now can you please get off the thread? You've been incredibly patronising.
    i'm sorry that you don't like what i have to say, but i have been through the uk university system, so i think some people out there will find what i have to say helpful.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    On top of that my course offers internships and publishing houses and I learn Dutch, Italian or Swedish.
    I looked at Queens in Belfast and I think that was £9k a year too. I think I'd rather go for the Netherlands. I looked at other European countries but I liked the Netherlands the most.
    Republic of Ireland, not Belfast

    Dublin: TCD, UCD
    Cork: UCC
    etc
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    (Original post by john2054)
    i'm sorry that you don't like what i have to say, but i have been through the uk university system, so i think some people out there will find what i have to say helpful.
    But you haven't studied abroad and maybe if you didn't speak to anyone as if they were 5 year olds you wouldn't be called patronising.

    No hun it would be helpful if they were looking at university in America or Canada. Not a country where I can easily get on an hour plane and come home.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Is rubbish.



    Speaking as an employer, there will be no issue for a British citizen getting a job in the UK with a Dutch degree.
    How can you talk about employing people with degrees, when the highest education you have yourself is a levels???
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Republic of Ireland, not Belfast

    Dublin: TCD, UCD
    Cork: UCC
    etc
    Ohhhhhh. Irish accents are pretty :love:
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    But you haven't studied abroad and maybe if you didn't speak to anyone as if they were 5 year olds you wouldn't be called patronising.

    No hun it would be helpful if they were looking at university in America or Canada. Not a country where I can easily get on an hour plane and come home.
    You are braver then i am, to study for a degree abroad. Good luck if you do choose this route!?!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    You are braver then i am, to study for a degree abroad. Good luck if you do choose this route!?!
    Thank you.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    How can you talk about employing people with degrees, when the highest education you have yourself is a levels???
    What does my education (30 years ago) have to do with who I employ?

    And I have a CompSci HND from a poly.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    What does my education have to do with who I employ?

    And I have a CompSci HND from a poly.
    we are talking about modern degrees here thanks
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    (Original post by john2054)
    How can you talk about employing people with degrees, when the highest education you have yourself is a levels???
    Just because you have a degree there's no need to have that snobby attitude and look down on those who don't for whatever reason.

    No offence but for someone in his 30s you come off an immature.
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    (Original post by candyaljamila)
    I have a European friend who's mom used to work as a doctor in her home country. When they moved to the UK her mom's degree wasn't accepted by the NHS hospitals and she wasn't even accepted as a nurse until she took a UK nursing course!
    I have also recently read an article about someone from a European country- can't remember which, but have a strong feeling it might have been dutch actually -who was a physiotherapist in his country but wasn't taken by the NHS in the UK, and after years wasting time on short courses he just decided to open his own private clinique.

    This might apply almost only for sensitive kind of jobs like in the health sector, but I do remember having this Polish friend who studied psychology back in Poland and said that her degree wasn't worth much during her job search here in the UK.
    Medicine is a "protected" degree in most countries.

    Polish universities are unknown in the UK and there isn't exactly a lack of psychology graduates there, taking a foreigner is meaningless in most cases.

    Going abroad depends on what you want to do. She wants to work in publishing, where having language skills is strongly recommended (for book translation and exportation) so it's relevant on her case.
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    (Original post by john2054)
    we are talking about modern degrees here thanks
    You are sailing close to the wind - please desist.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    You are sailing close to the wind - please desist.
    My dad's older than you are (in his mid sixties), dropped out of uni and he's earning a pretty decent salary. What that guy's saying is total rubbish so please just ignore it
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    (Original post by candyaljamila)
    I've had foreign friends who were excellent in their mother tongue (duh!) and had IELTS/TOEFEL certificates proving their proficiency in English as well as doing a course in English and their mother tongue in their country. That still wasn't accepted as proof of being able to translate from one language to the other for British employers!

    Lots of them would rather take someone who's slightly less fluent but who's got UK recognised degrees like NVQs and community translation certificates than someone who's excellent because it's their mother tongue but has foreign degrees/experiences the employer isn't familiar with!

    It might also be that these employers simply prefer to employ British people rather than them having doubts about the qualifications. But thought I'd report what I've heard from personal experience and leave the OP and anyone else to come up with their own conclusions.
    You need a degree in translation to work in translation... The UK is filled with immigrants from every country in the world, employers can therefore be very demanding for these jobs. You just have to look at Reed; every translating job in Russian, Spanish, Arabic, etc. gets more than 100 applications. The only languages that are sought after are German and Eastern Asian (Chinese and Japanese).
    Moreover, employers often expect you to be fluent in at least on programming language, since much translating work is related to digital content nowadays (internet pages, software, apps, games, etc.).
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    My dad's older than you are (in his mid sixties), dropped out of uni and he's earning a pretty decent salary. What that guy's saying is total rubbish so please just ignore it
    dw. I know

    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Josb)
    Medicine is a "protected" degree in most countries.

    Polish universities are unknown in the UK and there isn't exactly a lack of psychology graduates there, taking a foreigner is meaningless in most cases.

    Going abroad depends on what you want to do. She wants to work in publishing, where having language skills is strongly recommended (for book translation and exportation) so it's relevant on her case.

    Not entirely relatable because I'm British. Her friends are all foreigners.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    My dad's older than you are (in his mid sixties), dropped out of uni and he's earning a pretty decent salary. What that guy's saying is total rubbish so please just ignore it
    dw. I know

    Thanks!

    (And I can see you are too - which is more important.)
 
 
 
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