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The Physics PHYA2 thread! 5th June 2013 Watch

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    (Original post by posthumus)
    Guys...

    w = lamda D / s

    ^ Is this for single slits

    dsing() = n lamda

    ^ & this is for double slits & diffraction gratings :confused:

    I've probably got this wrong... so could anyone clear up my confusion please

    Thanks in advance !
    The first on is for diffraction where fringes are visible. So diffracting light through two slits etc.

    Second one is for a diffraction grating.
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    (Original post by Felix Ivers)
    Is the fringe spacing the distance between the centre of a maximum to the centre next maximum along or the centre of a maximum to the centre minimum next to it?

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    pretty sure its centre maximum to centre maximum
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    True I could, it just seems impractical to use a 102g mass, but then again, I'm not actually doing the practical, just writing about it; not my problem :P

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    (Original post by NabRoh)
    The first on is for diffraction where fringes are visible. So diffracting light through two slits etc.

    Second one is for a diffraction grating.
    Thanks for the response So the first one is for both single & double slits ?
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    i'm off for a shower, will probably be back for a bit more revision and then bedtime
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    This thread is awesome.... Sorry my answer has been answered by a previous reply
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    (Original post by Jack93o)
    pretty sure its centre maximum to centre maximum
    Yeah that would make sense, cheers

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    Anybody have any clues on whats most likely to come up??

    Suggestions would be nice

    Thankyou
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    Anybody have any clues on whats most likely to come up??

    Suggestions would be nice

    Thankyou
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    ok. Lets see if people can answer this question. It is quiet a bad question to come in the exam tomorrow. I did appear before I remember. Q: Distinguish between stationary and progressive waves.
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    (Original post by posthumus)
    Thanks for the response So the first one is for both single & double slits ?
    Yep. It would be more obvious with data in front of you.
    If they are giving you distance from slits to screen and the like then you should use the first one. As that is the only one that has that variable!
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    (Original post by R10T_N0_B0UNTY)
    Anybody have any clues on whats most likely to come up??

    Suggestions would be nice

    Thankyou
    Hmm I have a really bad feeling that some physics might come up!
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    Do the double slits come before or after the single slit?

    Brain is slowly losing its memory xD

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    (Original post by R10T_N0_B0UNTY)
    Anybody have any clues on whats most likely to come up??

    Suggestions would be nice

    Thankyou
    no time for prediction now. Good luck!
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    (Original post by NabRoh)
    Yep. It would be more obvious with data in front of you.
    If they are giving you distance from slits to screen and the like then you should use the first one. As that is the only one that has that variable!
    Thank you very much Attempting to learn everything in one night May not sleep... I did sit M1 last month so I'm not going to go through mechanics
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    ok. Lets see if people can answer this question. It is quiet a bad question to come in the exam tomorrow. I did appear before I remember. Q: Distinguish between stationary and progressive waves.
    A progressive wave travels in space whereas a stationary wave is fixed at 2 ends causing it to reflect and produce 2 interfering waves with a fixed number of nodes and antipodes dependant on frequency?

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    Can someone please draw the patterns you get (the graph with intensity) and the fringes for single slit double slit and diffraction grating
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    ok. Lets see if people can answer this question. It is quiet a bad question to come in the exam tomorrow. I did appear before I remember. Q: Distinguish between stationary and progressive waves.
    I reckon somethng like that might actually come up you know. But how much would it be worth? So you would say that one transfers energy the other one doesnt? One travels whilst one is stationary? One is the result of superposition? And so on...
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    When you do the double slit do you always have to include the first single slit?
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    (Original post by StalkeR47)
    ok. Lets see if people can answer this question. It is quiet a bad question to come in the exam tomorrow. I did appear before I remember. Q: Distinguish between stationary and progressive waves.
    stationary transfer no energy and are formed by two waves of similar amplitude, frequency and wavelength being superposed, e.g from being reflected back onto each other

    progressive waves transfer energy - longitudinal energy is transferred parallel to direction of travel of wave

    transverse - energy transferred perpendicular to the direction of travel of wave


    how many marks was it?
 
 
 
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