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    (Original post by vincrows)
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    Though is it true about the workload in later years in ?
    Isn't it just because you get better in time-management as the time passes?
    Number of lectures and/or other contact time may decrease but everybody i know was working as hard and for long hours in later years, too. Often even harder..
    From 2nd year onward you have fewer labs (and usually none in Easter term, which was a pain in IA), and in 3rd year there are very few lectures in Easter (I have less than 8 this year, all in the first 2 weeks).

    This means there is less supervision work and lab prep to be done, which most people supplement with doing past papers, etc. So while you may do as much (or more) work, it's going over stuff you have learned as opposed to what happened in IA, where you're learning new content up to a week before the exam. That's a hell of a lot easier and less stressful in my opinion. Also as you specialise more there is more overlap in the work you're doing, so it's not like you're learning 4 completely distinct subjects meaning when you're revising one part it may help you with your other options, so revision is much more efficient.
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    (Original post by Claree)
    I found first year natsci really hard in terms of workload, but from it I learnt how to cope best with the Cam workload. What I learnt from IA made me wish that I could go back and do first year again a lot better!

    2nd year I then found managable. I had time to learn all the course content thoroughly and do plenty of past papers before the exams, as well as fitting in all the extracurriculars I wanted. Having fewer labs helped, as that freed up more afternoons to do work. I did chemeng this year and the amount of content was less than 1st year natsci, and also the content fitted together more than the masses of different stuff we had to learn in first year. Starting chemeng from scratch in 2nd year meant that the content wasn't harder than 1st year either. I expect 3rd year will be harder now we've learnt the basics of chemeng!

    So for me it was a mixture of time management imroving, there being a slightly smaller workload, and me being more interested in the course. I think I put in as much effort as first year but knew what I was doing!

    By the time in first year where I'd gathered how I beeded to work, it was too late to implement it as I had so much material from earlier on in the year that I hadn't learnt! I genuinely think that I would still find the 1st year natsci workload hard (as in I didn't get time to do most things until the day before they were due) if I tried it again.

    From my friends who stayed on natsci for 2nd year, I think they appreciate not having to do subjects that they didn't overly enjoy in IA. They do seem to work as hard as first year, just have better work skills, as you said. And already having developed a mental framework with which to think about the subject at uni level helps, too. Often things in later years build on 1st year topics rather than being entirely new.

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    What would be your study tips/things you wish you knew in 1st year?
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    (Original post by Claree)
    I found first year natsci really hard in terms of workload, but from it I learnt how to cope best with the Cam workload. What I learnt from IA made me wish that I could go back and do first year again a lot better!

    2nd year I then found managable. I had time to learn all the course content thoroughly and do plenty of past papers before the exams, as well as fitting in all the extracurriculars I wanted. Having fewer labs helped, as that freed up more afternoons to do work. I did chemeng this year and the amount of content was less than 1st year natsci, and also the content fitted together more than the masses of different stuff we had to learn in first year. Starting chemeng from scratch in 2nd year meant that the content wasn't harder than 1st year either. I expect 3rd year will be harder now we've learnt the basics of chemeng!

    So for me it was a mixture of time management imroving, there being a slightly smaller workload, and me being more interested in the course. I think I put in as much effort as first year but knew what I was doing!

    By the time in first year where I'd gathered how I beeded to work, it was too late to implement it as I had so much material from earlier on in the year that I hadn't learnt! I genuinely think that I would still find the 1st year natsci workload hard (as in I didn't get time to do most things until the day before they were due) if I tried it again.

    From my friends who stayed on natsci for 2nd year, I think they appreciate not having to do subjects that they didn't overly enjoy in IA. They do seem to work as hard as first year, just have better work skills, as you said. And already having developed a mental framework with which to think about the subject at uni level helps, too. Often things in later years build on 1st year topics rather than being entirely new.

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    Agreed. I think if I did IA again now it would still be really hard as there is just so much vastly different content. I'd probably be much better at it but I think it would be harder than IB was.
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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    What if doing maths is my downtime.
    Am i destined for senior wranglership.
    I think everyone that does maths is like that
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    (Original post by Claree)
    I found first year natsci really hard in terms of workload, but from it I learnt how to cope best with the Cam workload. What I learnt from IA made me wish that I could go back and do first year again a lot better!

    2nd year I then found managable. I had time to learn all the course content thoroughly and do plenty of past papers before the exams, as well as fitting in all the extracurriculars I wanted. Having fewer labs helped, as that freed up more afternoons to do work. I did chemeng this year and the amount of content was less than 1st year natsci, and also the content fitted together more than the masses of different stuff we had to learn in first year. Starting chemeng from scratch in 2nd year meant that the content wasn't harder than 1st year either. I expect 3rd year will be harder now we've learnt the basics of chemeng!

    So for me it was a mixture of time management imroving, there being a slightly smaller workload, and me being more interested in the course. I think I put in as much effort as first year but knew what I was doing!

    By the time in first year where I'd gathered how I beeded to work, it was too late to implement it as I had so much material from earlier on in the year that I hadn't learnt! I genuinely think that I would still find the 1st year natsci workload hard (as in I didn't get time to do most things until the day before they were due) if I tried it again.

    From my friends who stayed on natsci for 2nd year, I think they appreciate not having to do subjects that they didn't overly enjoy in IA. They do seem to work as hard as first year, just have better work skills, as you said. And already having developed a mental framework with which to think about the subject at uni level helps, too. Often things in later years build on 1st year topics rather than being entirely new.

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    Yeah, I agree with a lot of things you said there.
    I think the first year is always the most difficult, especially mentally, because it's a huge jump, both in terms of volume and level of study, from school days.
    I've always said one of the most important and valuable things you learn from Cambridge (and all other top RGs) is the time-management skill.

    For some reason, all Cambridge natsci I've known were on physics, so I don't know about how chemistry/biology courses are like, but afaik they were not spending any less time on work in later years than 1st year. Maybe their contact time is less and the content more focused, but they were spending more time on working on their own.

    And even with those crazy workload, they're enjoying non-academic/social life a lot as well, which is very, very important at place like Cambridge.

    so OP, don't worry too much. You'll manage.
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    (Original post by vincrows)
    If maths is your downtime, what is cricket for you?
    Obligation? Struggle? Chore?
    Just something i do when the sky i blue.
    Lol
    Timepass

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    (Original post by gasfxekl)
    What would be your study tips/things you wish you knew in 1st year?
    Ur doing maths, thats my first tip.


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    (Original post by alow)
    From 2nd year onward you have fewer labs (and usually none in Easter term, which was a pain in IA), and in 3rd year there are very few lectures in Easter (I have less than 8 this year, all in the first 2 weeks).

    This means there is less supervision work and lab prep to be done, which most people supplement with doing past papers, etc. So while you may do as much (or more) work, it's going over stuff you have learned as opposed to what happened in IA, where you're learning new content up to a week before the exam. That's a hell of a lot easier and less stressful in my opinion. Also as you specialise more there is more overlap in the work you're doing, so it's not like you're learning 4 completely distinct subjects meaning when you're revising one part it may help you with your other options, so revision is much more efficient.
    right, ok, I was just replying to Claree as you posted.
    What do you think?
    Do you think you're spending shorter total time on work now than 1 st year?

    but come to think of it, you scientists don't have to deal with dissertation, so things may be different from arts/humanities students........
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    I always think 'what the hell have I gotten myself into?' when the NatSci workload is mentioned...
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    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Just something i do when the sky i blue.
    Lol
    Timepass

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    Only when the sky is blue?
    Good luck with that, then.....
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    I always think 'what the hell have I gotten myself into?' when the NatSci workload is mentioned...
    You've gotten yourself in to the best uni in UK (and one of the top in the world) to study the subject you're genuinely passionate about. What else and more do you want?
    It's not plain sailing but you will NOT regret it at the end of the road.
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    (Original post by gasfxekl)
    What would be your study tips/things you wish you knew in 1st year?
    Quite a lot of things...

    I'd read the lecture notes through before the lectures on them, so lectures were like revision and the extra things the lecturers said were more helpful to me, as I understood them. Then I'd read the lecture notes again after the lecture. Then I'd keep going back over earlier handouts throughout the term. Otherwise I get lost in the lectures or forget what the symbols mean half way through the lectue course. It's hard to find time for this though! The first reading always takes ages, and subsequent readings get quicker, so it helps starting as soon as possible e.g. the holidays.

    I think I'd go through notes more thoroughly, making sure that I could fit the content into a mental framework, rather than just reading them. Anything I couldn't remember on just reading it, I'd tackle it then rather than leaving it for later.

    I'd start doing past papers much earlier, say sometime through the Easter holidays, so I could get through a good number of them and have time for supervisors to help with what I couldn't do. I'd do old past paper questions and bring them to supervisions in Michaelmas and Lent. I'd try to do all past paper questions without my notes, so I'd go through the notes for a topic before starting exam qs on it. This meant that I got used to extract info from my memory rather than copying things out of notes. I'd start learning complicated proofs early, and would practise writing them from memory rather than copying them out.

    I'd make an effort to finish work early enough on the nights before physics and chemistry practicals so that I wasn't tired in them, otherwise it's horrible getting through them sleep-deprived! I'd also manage work better to have decent amounts of sleep generally, as the lectures I turned up to really tired, I might as well not have gone to! Likewise for supervisions. This year I made getting all the sleep I wanted a priority, which motivated me to do work well in advance! Once I had a fairly good idea what work I'd have to do that term, I'd plan my time and what work I'd do then for the rest of the term, and I could always amend it later. I'd plan realistic amounts of time to do work, always allocating too much time to do something if I wasn't sure how long it would take. (This year I left half an hour per problem sheet question as a guide, and adapted it if questions were significantly longer/shorter) This allowed plenty of time to look things up in my notes/online if necessary, and any left over time I could use to have a break, or go over notes/read ahead, or start on some other work.

    I'd read back through the lecture notes and the problem sheet before a supervision if I couldn't remember what we'd covered/the questions. I'd write my questions of things I didn't understand on the work I handed in or on my copy of the question sheet to make sure they were discussed in the supervision.

    I'd leave questions on problem sheets if I were stuck on them to go through in the supervision, rather than wasting hours trying different things. And I'd do the supervision sheet questions relating to each day's lectures as soon as possible after the lectures to save having masses of questions to do at once. I found it really hard to find the time for this though in first year!

    I'd properly go through all Michaelmas work over Christmas and try some old past paper questions on them.

    I'd not take on quite as much music extracurricular things to leave more time for work. I think I only really had evenings, Sat after lectures and Sundays to do work in first year, as afternoons were usually busy with practicals/supervisions. This meant that having rehearsals in evenings left me with not much time, other than at night, to work! I'd also waste less time wandering around town, making unneccessary trips to Sainsburys etc.

    I'd also have confidence that not everyone was miles more intelligent than me, and that I could do just as well if I worked smart and hard. (That's not something you can just do, though!)

    This sums up what I did this year that worked very well for me

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    (Original post by vincrows)
    right, ok, I was just replying to Claree as you posted.
    What do you think?
    Do you think you're spending shorter total time on work now than 1 st year?

    but come to think of it, you scientists don't have to deal with dissertation, so things may be different from arts/humanities students........
    I'd say I'm spending much less time learning new concepts. That's the part that really gets you down in exam term tbh.

    In total I think I spent less time working last year than in IA. II will be different though as the exams are much more important, but I can't see there being nearly as much actual work to do as IA. Just revision and going over papers, which is definitely easier.

    I'd say (at least for chem) our practical reports probably take as long as a dissertation of the course of a year. I wrote 30ish last year and they probably took on average 6 hours each.
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    (Original post by Claree)
    Quite a lot of things...

    I'd read the lecture notes through before the lectures on them, so lectures were like revision and the extra things the lecturers said were more helpful to me, as I understood them. Then I'd read the lecture notes again after the lecture. Then I'd keep going back over earlier handouts throughout the term. Otherwise I get lost in the lectures or forget what the symbols mean half way through the lectue course. It's hard to find time for this though! The first reading always takes ages, and subsequent readings get quicker, so it helps starting as soon as possible e.g. the holidays.

    I think I'd go through notes more thoroughly, making sure that I could fit the content into a mental framework, rather than just reading them. Anything I couldn't remember on just reading it, I'd tackle it then rather than leaving it for later.

    I'd start doing past papers much earlier, say sometime through the Easter holidays, so I could get through a good number of them and have time for supervisors to help with what I couldn't do. I'd do old past paper questions and bring them to supervisions in Michaelmas and Lent. I'd try to do all past paper questions without my notes, so I'd go through the notes for a topic before starting exam qs on it. This meant that I got used to extract info from my memory rather than copying things out of notes. I'd start learning complicated proofs early, and would practise writing them from memory rather than copying them out.

    I'd make an effort to finish work early enough on the nights before physics and chemistry practicals so that I wasn't tired in them, otherwise it's horrible getting through them sleep-deprived! I'd also manage work better to have decent amounts of sleep generally, as the lectures I turned up to really tired, I might as well not have gone to! Likewise for supervisions. This year I made getting all the sleep I wanted a priority, which motivated me to do work well in advance! Once I had a fairly good idea what work I'd have to do that term, I'd plan my time and what work I'd do then for the rest of the term, and I could always amend it later. I'd plan realistic amounts of time to do work, always allocating too much time to do something if I wasn't sure how long it would take. (This year I left half an hour per problem sheet question as a guide, and adapted it if questions were significantly longer/shorter) This allowed plenty of time to look things up in my notes/online if necessary, and any left over time I could use to have a break, or go over notes/read ahead, or start on some other work.

    I'd read back through the lecture notes and the problem sheet before a supervision if I couldn't remember what we'd covered/the questions. I'd write my questions of things I didn't understand on the work I handed in or on my copy of the question sheet to make sure they were discussed in the supervision.

    I'd leave questions on problem sheets if I were stuck on them to go through in the supervision, rather than wasting hours trying different things. And I'd do the supervision sheet questions relating to each day's lectures as soon as possible after the lectures to save having masses of questions to do at once. I found it really hard to find the time for this though in first year!

    I'd properly go through all Michaelmas work over Christmas and try some old past paper questions on them.

    I'd not take on quite as much music extracurricular things to leave more time for work. I think I only really had evenings, Sat after lectures and Sundays to do work in first year, as afternoons were usually busy with practicals/supervisions. This meant that having rehearsals in evenings left me with not much time, other than at night, to work! I'd also waste less time wandering around town, making unneccessary trips to Sainsburys etc.

    I'd also have confidence that not everyone was miles more intelligent than me, and that I could do just as well if I worked smart and hard. (That's not something you can just do, though!)

    This sums up what I did this year that worked very well for me

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    I think I'm too lazy for Cambridge
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    (Original post by paddy10663)
    Yes, I’ll be doing CompSci! I will also be away for the next few days but I’d be happy to talk to you about it after that. Someone else will, no doubt, fill you in on stuff well before then though.
    Thanks!
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    Can anyone please explain the difference between 'full term' and 'university term'? Like it says FT ends on 2nd December but UT ends on 19th December so does that mean we can't go home until 19th December?
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    (Original post by smartalan73)
    Can anyone please explain the difference between 'full term' and 'university term'? Like it says FT ends on 2nd December but UT ends on 19th December so does that mean we can't go home until 19th December?
    You won't have to stay until the 19th. Moving day for my college is the 5th.

    You're pretty much expected to stay in residence at Cambridge for the same duration as Full Term. There are some archaic rules about this where some people have to stay behind after their last term if they haven't been in Cambridge for long enough during their degree. But in practice this doesn't happen much due to how long you're in Cambridge before and after term, and people usually don't tell their college when they leave.
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    (Original post by sweeneyrod)
    Yes. 9.5 A*'s, 1A at GCSE; 4 A's at AS, 3 A*'s at A2 in Maths, Further Maths, Physics (and Chemistry dropped). On my personal statement I wrote about a few programming projects, some freelance programming I'd done, my StackOverflow account, and some books I'd read. Some programming things I think are worth doing are Project Euler, the British Informatics Olympiad, and the National Cipher Challenge. If you have any questions feel free to p.m. me.
    Thank you so much for the advice! I didn't get anywhere near that amount of A*s, but I got A*s in all of the hardest, most relevant subjects(Maths and sciences). I got all A*s and As, in my 11 subjects. I go to a below average school (non-private). Surely this should be ok, as long as I do really good in my A-levels. I chose Maths, Further Maths, Physics and Chemistry. I'm pretty good at Maths and Physics, so I think I can do well at A level.

    Over the summer is when I have only REALLY got into programming. I learnt Java, Python, CSS, HTML and a little bit of Swift. Although I find it easy to learn them, I am nowhere near fluent, and cannot code as fast or efficiently as I would like. I am thinking about doing projects similar to what you have done, but I need this fluency. What would you suggest that I do to improve my fluency? What age did you start programming?

    On top of those projects, I was thinking about creating a drone with an arduino/Raspberry Pi inside, and creating a program which would allow it to fly itself(or at least fly itself to a certain extent). I also have a few good ideas for apps; but again, fluency. Again, thank for the response!!!!
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    (Original post by alow)
    You won't have to stay until the 19th. Moving day for my college is the 5th.

    You're pretty much expected to stay in residence at Cambridge for the same duration as Full Term. There are some archaic rules about this where some people have to stay behind after their last term if they haven't been in Cambridge for long enough during their degree. But in practice this doesn't happen much due to how long you're in Cambridge before and after term, and people usually don't tell their college when they leave.
    So basically I could go home any time after 2nd but could stay up until 19th? As long as I've stayed in college the required number of nights already that term?
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    (Original post by smartalan73)
    So basically I could go home any time after 2nd but could stay up until 19th? As long as I've stayed in college the required number of nights already that term?
    You can stay at college the whole time if you residency contract says that or you pay for extra nights.

    Your college probably designates a moving day, and you'll likely have supervisions up until the 2nd anyway.
 
 
 
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