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    (Original post by tw781)
    So many people who applied last year and are applying this year have said they've done several rounds of applications, but when I went to Warwick open day every student I spoke to got in on their first round 😩😩


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    Well Warwick's course is graduate entry so it may have just been their first graduate application. GEM involves more box ticking than anything else, so if you have the minimum requirements for that year you're a lot more likely to get an interview.
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    (Original post by Natha_Lite)
    Well Warwick's course is graduate entry so it may have just been their first graduate application. GEM involves more box ticking than anything else, so if you have the minimum requirements for that year you're a lot more likely to get an interview.
    Gem is more competative for interview, not less. Seem to remember the interview rate is 1 in 4 for gem and 1 in 2.8ish for undergrad overall, though i am working from memory here.. Warwick interview ratio is a bit better i think but gem is conconsiderably more competitive overall, both in terms of applicants:spaces and because the compatition is stiffer since everyone has more life skills to present at interview. As few unis rely on PS anymore most invites to interview, gem or undergrad, are about box ticking in terms of meeting the ukcat/bmat/gamsat score, in which case its better to apply for undergrad, as cuttoffs are lower. Meeting the min requirements mean youre less likely to get an interview, not more so, at gem level.

    Just don't want people to get the wrong impression.
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    (Original post by am1992)
    Gem is more competative for interview, not less. Seem to remember the interview rate is 1 in 4 for gem and 1 in 2.8ish for undergrad overall, though i am working from memory here.. Warwick interview ratio is a bit better i think but gem is conconsiderably more competitive overall, both in terms of applicants:spaces and because the compatition is stiffer since everyone has more life skills to present at interview. As few unis rely on PS anymore most invites to interview, gem or undergrad, are about box ticking in terms of meeting the ukcat/bmat/gamsat score, in which case its better to apply for undergrad, as cuttoffs are lower. Meeting the min requirements mean youre less likely to get an interview, not more so, at gem level.

    Just don't want people to get the wrong impression.
    That's exactly how I imagined it! I guess the people who help out at open their days are the people who are very the best of best and that's why they were like Erm no it was my first time apply. They almost seemed shocked when I asked and also, in my opinion, they had barely ANY experience compared to what is guys are trying to gather up! I guess it's all about how to impress at interview!


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    (Original post by am1992)
    Gem is more competative for interview, not less. Seem to remember the interview rate is 1 in 4 for gem and 1 in 2.8ish for undergrad overall, though i am working from memory here.. Warwick interview ratio is a bit better i think but gem is conconsiderably more competitive overall, both in terms of applicants:spaces and because the compatition is stiffer since everyone has more life skills to present at interview. As few unis rely on PS anymore most invites to interview, gem or undergrad, are about box ticking in terms of meeting the ukcat/bmat/gamsat score, in which case its better to apply for undergrad, as cuttoffs are lower. Meeting the min requirements mean youre less likely to get an interview, not more so, at gem level.

    Just don't want people to get the wrong impression.
    Of course, GEM is definitely more competitive. I wouldn't want to give the impression that it's easy.It's just that once you meet the cutoff requirements for that year you'll likely get an interview.
    It's just making sure you meet the cutoffs with the UKCAT, GAMSAT etc. and ensuring you have the right degree. I feel with the undergrad entry there are usually a lot more variables with GCSEs, AS/A2 grades and the admissions test, it's slightly trickier to work out where you stand. This is my opinion though, so don't take it as fact.
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    (Original post by Natha_Lite)
    Of course, GEM is definitely more competitive. I wouldn't want to give the impression that it's easy.It's just that once you meet the cutoff requirements for that year you'll likely get an interview.
    It's just making sure you meet the cutoffs with the UKCAT, GAMSAT etc. and ensuring you have the right degree. I feel with the undergrad entry there are usually a lot more variables with GCSEs, AS/A2 grades and the admissions test, it's slightly trickier to work out where you stand. This is my opinion though, so don't take it as fact.
    Fair point, it is more straight forward in some ways in that its often just making sure you have a 2.1/1st, though some unis do look at a-levels i think (not 100% sure though, im scottish and didnt do a-levels or equivalent so only applied to programs that dont require them).
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    (Original post by tw781)
    That's exactly how I imagined it! I guess the people who help out at open their days are the people who are very the best of best and that's why they were like Erm no it was my first time apply. They almost seemed shocked when I asked and also, in my opinion, they had barely ANY experience compared to what is guys are trying to gather up! I guess it's all about how to impress at interview!


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    Bit early to be considering interview but ii found that having lots of experience makes things easier. Means you dont keep referring back to the same example each question. That said, it is all about how you present yourself, if youre confident and clearly enthusiastic that's 90% of the battle won.
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    (Original post by am1992)
    Bit early to be considering interview but ii found that having lots of experience makes things easier. Means you dont keep referring back to the same example each question. That said, it is all about how you present yourself, if youre confident and clearly enthusiastic that's 90% of the battle won.
    That's true. And tbh, it depends on the people they have interviewing. Certain people will like certain personality types while others with naturally dislike them!

    I think I will be lucky to get in on my first round unless I have an unbelievable UKCAT as I'm just being realistic! Although getting my NA/HCA job has really boosted my confidence as I didn't prepare for the interview and got the job when they said there were 40 applicants so I'm feeling a tiny bit better about this whole competitive process over the next year.


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    I have my UKCAT tomorrow morning - not very feeling optimistic about it tbh :/
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    (Original post by Emily Thorne)
    I have my UKCAT tomorrow morning - not very feeling optimistic about it tbh :/
    Good luck! Stay positive and calm and just so your best.


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    (Original post by Amywool)
    So maybe this was me being a bit dumb but I was under the impression that some unis took the percentiles of al test takers scores to find a cut off point which reflected high scorers and then they used this for the GEM. when really they do this just for the applicants. So I was fretting because I knew I wouldn't get as good as someone just out of school. Maybe people already knew this I don't know - probably me just being stupid!
    I got 680: 620, 740, 710, 650 and I know 2 other gem applicants who got 660 and 665
    Now I'm confused haha! But I thought unis took the top scores of their applicants? Let's say the top marks were 750-800, but a uni only got applicants where the max score was 750, they'd have to take the top 20 percent from their pool? Does that make sense? Someone correct me if I'm wrong please.

    680 isn't a bad score at all! Well done, you should be proud of yourself. I wouldn't judge the averages by what you see on here. The TSR can give a skewed representation. With 680, I'd maybe put down Warwick as their cut off was 700 last year.

    Can I ask what you materials you prepared with? And also, how you felt the exam compared to revision material in each section? Thanks!! (Sorry for late reply)


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    (Original post by HCAssistant93)
    Now I'm confused haha! But I thought unis took the top scores of their applicants? Let's say the top marks were 750-800, but a uni only got applicants where the max score was 750, they'd have to take the top 20 percent from their pool? Does that make sense? Someone correct me if I'm wrong please.

    680 isn't a bad score at all! Well done, you should be proud of yourself. I wouldn't judge the averages by what you see on here. The TSR can give a skewed representation. With 680, I'd maybe put down Warwick as their cut off was 700 last year.

    Can I ask what you materials you prepared with? And also, how you felt the exam compared to revision material in each section? Thanks!! (Sorry for late reply)


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    Is it too late to apply for this cycle, considering I need to get a decent chunk of work experience? Could I say in my PS that I would be getting exp later on in the year? Also when some unis say they want a 'science subject' for your degree, does CS or Maths count?
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    (Original post by Hypnotized)
    Is it too late to apply for this cycle, considering I need to get a decent chunk of work experience? Could I say in my PS that I would be getting exp later on in the year? Also when some unis say they want a 'science subject' for your degree, does CS or Maths count?
    No, you need to have completed work experience to talk about in your personal statement.

    A science subject normally means biology or chemistry to at least AS level.

    I'd say your best bet is to focus on experience this year, and apply in September. Might be worth practising the UKCAT in advance this year (people improve on multiple attempts).
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    (Original post by MJK91)
    A science subject normally means biology or chemistry to at least AS level.
    I meant for the degree subject that you do itself, for example King's says they want a 2.1 in a 'science subject'.
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    (Original post by Hypnotized)
    I meant for the degree subject that you do itself, for example King's says they want a 2.1 in a 'science subject'.
    Sorry got a bit muddled in my reply. A 'science subject' will normally still be a degree containing biology or chemistry to at least AS-level standard. Hope that clarifies a bit. Computer science, maths, physics don't normally count (definitely not for King's).
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    (Original post by HCAssistant93)
    Now I'm confused haha! But I thought unis took the top scores of their applicants? Let's say the top marks were 750-800, but a uni only got applicants where the max score was 750, they'd have to take the top 20 percent from their pool? Does that make sense? Someone correct me if I'm wrong please.

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    Thats right
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    (Original post by MJK91)
    Sorry got a bit muddled in my reply. A 'science subject' will normally still be a degree containing biology or chemistry to at least AS-level standard. Hope that clarifies a bit. Computer science, maths, physics don't normally count (definitely not for King's).
    I see, thanks for clarifying. I assume this holds even if you have Chem A-level already. Regardless I think I'll try to get some work experience for September, which is probably fairly difficult but you never know if you ask the right people.
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    (Original post by Hypnotized)
    I see, thanks for clarifying. I assume this holds even if you have Chem A-level already. Regardless I think I'll try to get some work experience for September, which is probably fairly difficult but you never know if you ask the right people.
    Worth checking with the schools, some will let you off the degree requirements (e.g. Barts) if you have chemistry at A-level.

    Work experience, i.e. shadowing and so on, isn't really the problem. Most schools are looking for a commitment to care, so you will need at least some voluntary experience (working in a hospital, a care home, St Johns, something non-personal and involving patients). The longer the better.

    By all means attempt applying, but realistically this is what schools are looking for. In reality your UKCAT score will determine how much chance you have of an interview, but the voluntary experience will determine whether you get an offer.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by MJK91)
    No, you need to have completed work experience to talk about in your personal statement.

    A science subject normally means biology or chemistry to at least AS level.

    I'd say your best bet is to focus on experience this year, and apply in September. Might be worth practising the UKCAT in advance this year (people improve on multiple attempts).
    Hi MJK,

    I noticed that you mentioned you did multiple application cycles before getting in at WMS. Would you mind sharing your initial scores and thought process when you didn't get in? And what you then did during this interim period to further strengthen your application?

    I'm a bit in limbo at the moment, as I definitely scored a mediocre UKCAT score (635) this morning, which is not worthy of GEM, but part of me wants to carry on with the application just so I can get the full admission cycle "experience" of writing a personal statement and the pain-staking "Reject" on UCAS. The other half of me wants to submit this score for the 5-year courses and use the interviews (should I even get any for the 5-year course) as a further test run for future GEM applications.

    What are everyone's thoughts/experiences about having such a non-competitive UKCAT score and the out look of multiple application cycles?
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    (Original post by PkT1991)
    Hi MJK,

    I noticed that you mentioned you did multiple application cycles before getting in at WMS. Would you mind sharing your initial scores and thought process when you didn't get in? And what you then did during this interim period to further strengthen your application?

    I'm a bit in limbo at the moment, as I definitely scored a mediocre UKCAT score (635) this morning, which is not worthy of GEM, but part of me wants to carry on with the application just so I can get the full admission cycle "experience" of writing a personal statement and the pain-staking "Reject" on UCAS. The other half of me wants to submit this score for the 5-year courses and use the interviews (should I even get any for the 5-year course) as a further test run for future GEM applications.

    What are everyone's thoughts/experiences about having such a non-competitive UKCAT score and the out look of multiple application cycles?
    I also didn't get an awesome UKCAT score this morning &I will still be applying so I can also get the entire experience just like you. I don't think there's any point in not even trying tbh since we don't really have anything to loose. I thinks it's worth it - what if a miracle happens 😂 JS
 
 
 
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