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    (Original post by letsbehonest)
    If you got X amount of money, what medical research would you carry out?
    Breast cancer research

    Over 80% of all breast cancers occur in women over the age of 50 :/
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    (Original post by letsbehonest)
    If you got X amount of money, what medical research would you carry out?
    HIV research
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    (Original post by DrWally)
    What thoughts and feelings might face someone offered alcohol to celebrate after receiving a liver transplant?

    A person with learning disabilities is regularly being teased by neighbours, how might it affect them?

    What do you guess an overweight person might feel and think after being told their arthritis is due to their weight?

    A friend tells you he feels bad because his family has always cheated to obtain extra benefits - how would you respond?

    I am clueless on the questions above. Any help?
    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'd say that not every interview question gives you the chance to impress the interviewer with your knowledge or experience. I think these kinda questions give you the chance to show you can put yourself in somebody elses position, be empathetic and also be responsible and reasonable in how you approach 'real life' situations - I guess if you do this well you'll impress them
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    (Original post by letsbehonest)
    If you got X amount of money, what medical research would you carry out?
    Research into genetics. Human Genome Project allowed us to eventually discover a lot about genetics, however not a great deal of progress has been made to put this new knowledge into practice, and to explore the potential advances in treatment and cures that such knowledge could allow. On a personal level, I'm very interested in the use of engineered viruses to cure some genetic diseases such as Cystic Fibrosis
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    When discussing the pros and con for privatised healthcare, should you say how it is a benefit to the NHS? Or can you also discuss the benefits of privatised healthcare even though it doesn't directly benefit the NHS?
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    Any Liverpool interview questions?
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    (Original post by lindseyyy)
    Patient anonymity


    When discussing cases from your work experience, does any one have any idea about how to approach the sensitive details? E.g. If you wanted to discuss the way that a doctor approached a certain case, would you be allowed to give details of the case such as the illness, treatment plan and the way that the patient responded?

    Thanks
    You can discuss any/all detail as long as none of it can be traced to the patient directly or indirectly. You need to discern what is appropriate: if you were discussing the case with a friend who lived locally then mentioning an 82 year old lady who lives in "The Acorns" might give away her identity 100% because your friend has a granny in that home and knows everyone that lives there, if you were at an interview 200 miles away it could be completely harmless. Just 'dumb-down' anything identifiable so her age becomes 'elderly', her name becomes 'lady' and her nursing home becomes 'local care home' and bingo! you can give as much medical detail as you like. Bear in mind that you need to respect and protect the identity of your doctor too. It wouldn't be wise to be too up-front in criticisms of the way the case was handled as a) you're likely to be proven to be naive/ wrong and b) your interviewer may have attended your medic's wedding!
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    (Original post by SiMan)
    When discussing the pros and con for privatised healthcare, should you say how it is a benefit to the NHS? Or can you also discuss the benefits of privatised healthcare even though it doesn't directly benefit the NHS?
    Both, yes, everything, all of it. The private sector subsidises the NHS, threatens the NHS, drains the NHS, boosts the NHS, competes with the NHS, off-loads the NHS, encourages freedom of choice and, generally, employs the same doctors as the NHS. Open discussion, no right or wrong answers, if there was a correct outcome the politicians would have sorted it out years ago...
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    (Original post by Dr Gin)
    Both, yes, everything, all of it. The private sector subsidises the NHS, threatens the NHS, drains the NHS, boosts the NHS, competes with the NHS, off-loads the NHS, encourages freedom of choice and, generally, employs the same doctors as the NHS. Open discussion, no right or wrong answers, if there was a correct outcome the politicians would have sorted it out years ago...
    yeah.. i figured, it's best to be open then to just favour the nhs's interest in this.
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    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    Breast cancer research

    Over 80% of all breast cancers occur in women over the age of 50 :/
    Would you really do that? Do you not think enough money goes into breast cancer research already? What about lung/prostate cancer, which kill just as many people, in fact lung cancer kills more people, and receive far less funding?

    'in 2012, breast cancer received research funding of £41m, Leukaemia received research funding of £32m, bowel cancer received £35m, Prostate cancer got £21m and lung cancer - remember it is the biggest killer - got less than £15m.'

    'Breast cancer receives just over £3,500 of research funding per death from the disease. Leukaemia receives over £7000 of research funding per mortality.

    Lung cancer receives just over £400 per death.'

    Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22310825

    I appreciate you could argue a lot of lung cancer is caused by smoking, so it's probably also worth looking at this next report. The graph is astonishing. Breast cancer in recent years has received so much more funding than other cancers, and has a higher survival rate:

    'Of the £521 million spent by the National Cancer Research Institute partners (NCRI) in 2011, only £5 million was spent on pancreatic cancer. In contrast, Breast cancer received £42 million, Bowel cancer, £23million, Leukaemia £32 million, and Prostate £17million.

    Ovarian cancer, which affects 6,955 women annually,(approx. 1400 fewer than pancreatic cancer) received nearly three times more funding than pancreatic cancer in 2011. Ovarian cancer has a 41 per cent five-year survival rate, pancreatic cancer has just over a three per cent survival rate.'

    Source: http://pancreaticcanceraction.org/pa...earch-funding/

    Not trying to launch an attack on you or anything, it's just the inequality present in the distribution of funding for cancer research frustrates me and I like getting the opportunity to point it out! Plus, it's definitely something good to be able to speak about at interview
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    (Original post by StephenNaulls)
    Would you really do that? Do you not think enough money goes into breast cancer research already? What about lung/prostate cancer, which kill just as many people, in fact lung cancer kills more people, and receive far less funding?

    'in 2012, breast cancer received research funding of £41m, Leukaemia received research funding of £32m, bowel cancer received £35m, Prostate cancer got £21m and lung cancer - remember it is the biggest killer - got less than £15m.'

    'Breast cancer receives just over £3,500 of research funding per death from the disease. Leukaemia receives over £7000 of research funding per mortality.

    Lung cancer receives just over £400 per death.'

    Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22310825

    I appreciate you could argue a lot of lung cancer is caused by smoking, so it's probably also worth looking at this next report. The graph is astonishing. Breast cancer in recent years has received so much more funding than other cancers, and has a higher survival rate:

    'Of the £521 million spent by the National Cancer Research Institute partners (NCRI) in 2011, only £5 million was spent on pancreatic cancer. In contrast, Breast cancer received £42 million, Bowel cancer, £23million, Leukaemia £32 million, and Prostate £17million.

    Ovarian cancer, which affects 6,955 women annually,(approx. 1400 fewer than pancreatic cancer) received nearly three times more funding than pancreatic cancer in 2011. Ovarian cancer has a 41 per cent five-year survival rate, pancreatic cancer has just over a three per cent survival rate.'

    Source: http://pancreaticcanceraction.org/pa...earch-funding/

    Not trying to launch an attack on you or anything, it's just the inequality present in the distribution of funding for cancer research frustrates me and I like getting the opportunity to point it out! Plus, it's definitely something good to be able to speak about at interview
    Thank you very much +rep

    I was totally unaware breast cancer received so much funding in comparison to the others!

    I'm quite surprised lung cancer doesn't receive much more..
    I'll definetely look at the report more in detail :yy:
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    (Original post by FlavaFavourFruit)
    Thank you very much +rep

    I was totally unaware breast cancer received so much funding in comparison to the others!

    I'm quite surprised lung cancer doesn't receive much more..
    I'll definetely look at the report more in detail :yy:
    Haha, no worries! Obviously breast cancer is horrible and it deserves funding, but so is every form of cancer, and some have higher death rates/lower life expectancies than others- the funding should probably represent that. Blah, it's probably a long and interesting debate!
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    (Original post by StephenNaulls)
    Haha, no worries! Obviously breast cancer is horrible and it deserves funding, but so is every form of cancer, and some have higher death rates/lower life expectancies than others- the funding should probably represent that. Blah, it's probably a long and interesting debate!
    Yeah agreed :yes: the interviewers would have loved to grill students on that!!
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    If it is common and survivable then it will have plenty of living enemies campaigning and fundraising hard against it...
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    Okay, so I actually don't know what other benefits the CCGs brings in the recent NHS reform other than the it consists of GP practises that have a better insight of what their patients need and so these local groups can work with the local services to provide quality care for the community. And of course the NHS England would oversea them and are responsible for the GP practises and other service providers. So this system works well within itself to give what is needed.

    However in what other ways is the CCG system 'better' than the previous SHA and PTC system?
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    What kind of response could I give to, "what do you think about the work of junior doctors?"

    I have searched on google but no website has been able to give me concrete descriptions of what junior doctors actually do and what their daily schedule is like!!!

    Sorry if the question has been asked before, this thread is massive...
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    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    What kind of response could I give to, "what do you think about the work of junior doctors?"

    I have searched on google but no website has been able to give me concrete descriptions of what junior doctors actually do and what their daily schedule is like!!!

    Sorry if the question has been asked before, this thread is massive...
    Surely your work experience and talking to junior doctors should have allowed you an insight into what they do? Isn't that what everyone writes on their PS? :p:
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    During MMI roleplays, do you introduce yourself to the actor/shake the actors hand etc? Or do you just launch straight into the scenario?
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    (Original post by Eva.Gregoria)
    What kind of response could I give to, "what do you think about the work of junior doctors?"

    I have searched on google but no website has been able to give me concrete descriptions of what junior doctors actually do and what their daily schedule is like!!!

    Sorry if the question has been asked before, this thread is massive...
    From what I observed, junior drs work extremely hard, long hrs often without a proper break. They were the main professionals in pt care, once the consultant did the ward round and made a plan it was up to the junior drs to organise and prioritise the care. From writing TTO's and discharge letters, reviewing unwell pts and diagnosing, booking X-rays and CT scans, often covering 2 wards when oncall, admitting and clerking pts, taking bloods, cannulating and filling in paper work.

    As I said once the ward round was complete the Consultant and Spr were hardly seen on the ward but available if the junior Dr required any advice or assistance or if they had to be updated on unwell pts.
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    To shake or not to hand shake?

    I say always hand shake - it is a formal greeting, leaves you feeling confident and also the interviewers seeing you as confident - Just don't go all HULK on them!


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    (Original post by rc16)
    During MMI roleplays, do you introduce yourself to the actor/shake the actors hand etc? Or do you just launch straight into the scenario?
 
 
 
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