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GCSE AQA English Literature - June 2016 *Official Thread* watch

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    Did anyone else that does relationships do brothers compared with nettles?


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    Does anyone want to take a look at the (more-or-less) duplicate answer I wrote for Question 6? I've been worrying about it for like, hours and I finally churned out a copy that looks quite similar to what I wrote in the exam? Would anyone be willing to take a look at it and maybe mark it?
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    (Original post by Moon.idk)
    I did!!! i compared to his coy mistress to sonnet 43 whereas most people compared it to in paris with you. I wanted to do brothers but there wasn't much for me to say about it
    I compared it to Ghazal. Loads of people compared it to one of the sonnets.
    I know quite a lot of people compared it to In Paris With You because of Mr Bruffs last minute upload last night.

    One person compared it to Hour, another compared it to Born Yesterday, and another compared it to Praise Song. I was genuinely confused.

    Brothers is an easy poem, but I heard the question was a bit difficult?
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    (Original post by keepyourapology)
    Does anyone want to take a look at the (more-or-less) duplicate answer I wrote for Question 6? I've been worrying about it for like, hours and I finally churned out a copy that looks quite similar to what I wrote in the exam? Would anyone be willing to take a look at it and maybe mark it?
    I wouldn't stress over it. What's done is done. Of course, there's no harm in having it looked over
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    Anyone else do THCM and Hour ? What did you say?
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    (Original post by Abbiefisher28)
    Oh ok that's relieved me Not sure how good my points were but I tried to make the distinction that Belfast Confetti depicted the first-hand experience of conflict, while Poppies showed the effects on relatives/those indirectly involved x
    I'm sure you've done great! I can't tell how I did, although I definitely feel like I did better in the unit 1 exam x
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    (Original post by Jem +)
    I wouldn't stress over it. What's done is done. Of course, there's no harm in having it looked over
    1. The structure of Poppies, at first glance, is laid out in neat stanzas, so this makes you think that there is no incoherence in the poem. However, when you look deeply into it, you see that there are lots of caesuras and enjambments, and this makes the reader understand that though Weir seems to be holding herself together, outwardly, she is falling apart inside, as her thoughts ramble and obsess over the thought of her son. The line 'Three days before Armistice Sunday' shows that perhaps, her son was lost quite a while ago, hence people expect her to be holding herself together, but she can't show them that she is still grieving even after all this time.
    However, in TYP, Minhinnick doesn't adopt the same personal narration as Weir, and focuses on using the characters in the poem to invoke the same feelings of sympathy and understanding in his readers. The idea of a 'muezzin's eyes wild with despair' proves to the readers that the muezzin is facing a difficult time in his life, as his home, his comforts and his bond with God have been tainted by the war. This shows the reader that the Palestinians are facing a struggle in their lives and Minhinnick, a mere passerby recounts their life experiences to allow the reader to understand the true hardships that these people face in their lives.2. Secondly, the choice of words in Poppies such as 'blockade', 'crimped', 'disrupted' and 'spasms' have violent connotations of death and destruction. Even the Poppy itself, despite being a symbol of remembrance, can also be viewed as a wound, with the bullet entry at the center. These destructive images throughout the poem form the idea of a violent death of her son. However, as this is not a certainty, Weir does not know for sure, and hence, her lack of closure leads to the desperation and frustration for her son. This lack of a peaceful death reflects on the mother's constant obsessing, showing that the son's death has created a torpedo of emotions in Weir's life, making it more difficult for her to move on. This ultimately prolongs her period of suffering.In TYP, Minhinnick uses words with similar connotations of violence and destruction, such as 'poison (gas)', 'barbarian', 'despair' and 'blood' to highlight the difficulties that the different people of the land are facing. These words are each used to describe a different aspect of the poem, hence showing that people across Palestine are facing difficult times, due to the war. The idea of a 'barbarian sun' makes the reader think that even nature is against the people of the land, and that there is no hope for them. This further enforces the idea that hardships have become an everyday part of their lives.3. Lastly, both poems have the idea of hope in their penultimate stanzas, only for it to be taken away later on in the poem. For example, in Poppies, Weir says 'I went to your bedroom...released a songbird from its cage'. This line, specifically the songbird representing the son, shows that Weir wants to let go of the past and the pain that his death has caused her. It shows that she is ready to move on and finally end the vicious circle of desperation, obsession and frustration over her son's passing. However this hope is taken away, when she says 'without a winter coat..gloves', showing that despite being ready to "let go", when it comes to visiting the war memorial plaque, nothing matters more than tracing the inscriptions on the memorial, not even dressing up properly. Again, this leads to Weir's everlasting desperation over her son's death, showing that she will never truly be free of grieving for his loss.This is repeated in TYP, as in the penultimate stanza, Minhinnick says 'a beggar child..blessed it [the missile] with a smile'. This is quite an odd image, as children represent progress and advancement whereas missiles represent destruction and conflict. This contrast makes the reader question why a child would be smiling at a missile in the first place- is he happy because it's not being aimed at him and the people he loves? Therefore, this line enforces the idea of hope, that maybe the children will be allowed to grow up, experience normal things and be with their parents. However, again, this hope is snatched away in the following stanza, with the line, 'the fruit fell into his arms'. The fruit, representing growth and progress, in Palestine, 'falling' into the child's arms shows that the last hope for rebirth in the country is gone, as it has been overruled by the people's inherent instinct of survival - to eat, to drink and to sleep, and therefore, the hardships in their lives will never cease.
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    (Original post by keepyourapology)
    1. The structure of Poppies, at first glance, is laid out in neat stanzas, so this makes you think that there is no incoherence in the poem. However, when you look deeply into it, you see that there are lots of caesuras and enjambments, and this makes the reader understand that though Weir seems to be holding herself together, outwardly, she is falling apart inside, as her thoughts ramble and obsess over the thought of her son. The line 'Three days before Armistice Sunday' shows that perhaps, her son was lost quite a while ago, hence people expect her to be holding herself together, but she can't show them that she is still grieving even after all this time.
    However, in TYP, Minhinnick doesn't adopt the same personal narration as Weir, and focuses on using the characters in the poem to invoke the same feelings of sympathy and understanding in his readers. The idea of a 'muezzin's eyes wild with despair' proves to the readers that the muezzin is facing a difficult time in his life, as his home, his comforts and his bond with God have been tainted by the war. This shows the reader that the Palestinians are facing a struggle in their lives and Minhinnick, a mere passerby recounts their life experiences to allow the reader to understand the true hardships that these people face in their lives.2. Secondly, the choice of words in Poppies such as 'blockade', 'crimped', 'disrupted' and 'spasms' have violent connotations of death and destruction. Even the Poppy itself, despite being a symbol of remembrance, can also be viewed as a wound, with the bullet entry at the center. These destructive images throughout the poem form the idea of a violent death of her son. However, as this is not a certainty, Weir does not know for sure, and hence, her lack of closure leads to the desperation and frustration for her son. This lack of a peaceful death reflects on the mother's constant obsessing, showing that the son's death has created a torpedo of emotions in Weir's life, making it more difficult for her to move on. This ultimately prolongs her period of suffering.In TYP, Minhinnick uses words with similar connotations of violence and destruction, such as 'poison (gas)', 'barbarian', 'despair' and 'blood' to highlight the difficulties that the different people of the land are facing. These words are each used to describe a different aspect of the poem, hence showing that people across Palestine are facing difficult times, due to the war. The idea of a 'barbarian sun' makes the reader think that even nature is against the people of the land, and that there is no hope for them. This further enforces the idea that hardships have become an everyday part of their lives.3. Lastly, both poems have the idea of hope in their penultimate stanzas, only for it to be taken away later on in the poem. For example, in Poppies, Weir says 'I went to your bedroom...released a songbird from its cage'. This line, specifically the songbird representing the son, shows that Weir wants to let go of the past and the pain that his death has caused her. It shows that she is ready to move on and finally end the vicious circle of desperation, obsession and frustration over her son's passing. However this hope is taken away, when she says 'without a winter coat..gloves', showing that despite being ready to "let go", when it comes to visiting the war memorial plaque, nothing matters more than tracing the inscriptions on the memorial, not even dressing up properly. Again, this leads to Weir's everlasting desperation over her son's death, showing that she will never truly be free of grieving for his loss.This is repeated in TYP, as in the penultimate stanza, Minhinnick says 'a beggar child..blessed it [the missile] with a smile'. This is quite an odd image, as children represent progress and advancement whereas missiles represent destruction and conflict. This contrast makes the reader question why a child would be smiling at a missile in the first place- is he happy because it's not being aimed at him and the people he loves? Therefore, this line enforces the idea of hope, that maybe the children will be allowed to grow up, experience normal things and be with their parents. However, again, this hope is snatched away in the following stanza, with the line, 'the fruit fell into his arms'. The fruit, representing growth and progress, in Palestine, 'falling' into the child's arms shows that the last hope for rebirth in the country is gone, as it has been overruled by the people's inherent instinct of survival - to eat, to drink and to sleep, and therefore, the hardships in their lives will never cease.
    Thank you so much!
    Didn't read your question properly - my mistake (I thought you were referring to the unseen). I could still have a look, but I don't think I'm in a good enough position as someone who has studied your cluster (and therefore the poems you are referring to).
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    (Original post by Jem +)
    Didn't read your question properly - my mistake (I thought you were referring to the unseen). I could still have a look, but I don't think I'm in a good enough position as someone who has studied your cluster (and therefore the poems you are referring to).
    Oh, that's alright, but thank you anyway. I guess it's up there for anyone who'd like to mark it. :P
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    Did anyone do Poppies and Belfast Confetti for the conflict cluster??
    YESSSS I did too
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    (Original post by gigge)
    Did anyone compare poppies with come on come back ?? i think they suited quite well
    Yes! You and my friend at school are the only people who I found who compared poppies with come on come back. I was so confident with those two poems and they matched quite well. hopefully I get an A.
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    (Original post by MeganMcAlister)
    I'm sure you've done great! I can't tell how I did, although I definitely feel like I did better in the unit 1 exam x
    Yes I feel exactly the same! X
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    Are these points for THCM and Hour ok?
    I discussed how thcm is metaphyscial poetry and a dramatic monologue which is structured with thesis antithesis and synthesis with stanza size suggesting differences in time -- I linked with the speakers belief in carpe diem and how he is concerned by time etc. Also belief of carpe diem in hour where the speaker believes the first moments of love should be cherished--- uses sonnet form but a different metre to reflect the special moment they share- hence why they must seize it
    Then I discussed how hour's speaker believes in natural love rather than one bombarded by artificial light and worthless tradition - portrays this through extended metaphor of nature and value- I then contrasted this with how the speaker of thcm believes he and the beloved will naturally fall in love through the use of changing pronouns from singular to plural...
    Finally I said that both believed love has difficulties but believes they can be overcome if the love is strong enough - e.g rivers in thcm suggests distance but his vegetable live suggests strength and also rivers will meet; hour has a foreboding shadow created by fairytale references and 'but' although they backhand the night due to the power of the hour ...
    Please tell me what you think:p:p


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    I compared To his coy mistress with Manhunt, you can compare the poem with any other poems as long as you back your points up
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    (Original post by Ziggyyyy)
    I did Poppies and Bayonet Charge, did anyone else???
    my friend did that!
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    Did anyone compare Poppies with Out of the Blue or was it just me
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    Loads of people did poppies with Belfast confetti/out of the blue. Spoke to my teachers and it's all good
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    I did the Right Word and At the Border. ((conflict))
    anyone else? xD
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    (Original post by GCSElyfe)
    Did anyone compare The Right word with At the border,1979?


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    moi!! thank God theres someone else lol
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    Idk if I interpreted the Unseen poem right. I talked about how the young soldiers are using the blades in a ruthless way without realising the consequences.
 
 
 
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