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    (Original post by Sappho)
    See, I'd much rather put in loaaaads of stupid page numbers than getting killed on a rugby pitch Swimming is okay... (and walking on the beach with nice people :suith: )

    You don't like children? Well, in any case they are a greater challenge than any sport out there, but they can be sooo lovely as well

    You mean, if I fail my future, I'll always have that to show my grandchildren?
    No, not at all. Just that it's always nice to see your name on something like that.

    I dislike children, which is weird because they seem to love me. Aah bloody telkhines!
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    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    No, not at all. Just that it's always nice to see your name on something like that.

    I dislike children, which is weird because they seem to love me. Aah bloody telkhines!
    That is true. I'm busy this week, but hopefully I'll be able to produce something interesting next week. Gotta LOVE spring holidays!

    You're probably just too cool to like children :cool:
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    (Original post by Sappho)
    That's a nice plan, with tutoring. Besides, it's so much FUN! Really, as long as you love the children a little bit, you'll enjoy it mucho! I can't wait to work with children again, even if it's not for Classics.
    I wonder how much benefit there would be if kids were taught Latin from an early age?
    I'm always very sceptical of claims that teaching French from Y2 onwards would be so much better and that it's the "best time to learn" because they'd spend about 5 years learning basic stuff and end up frustrated with it all because they still can't string a sentence together!
    Definitely growing up in a French-speaking environment would be better than learning it later, but as for classroom-based teaching from an early age, I'm not so sure.
    (Though this might be one of those time-honoured debates classicists are faced with from time to time -- in which case feel free to ignore!)

    When I held a lunchtime 'Latin club' in my school, it was immense fun, but only one of the people attending was actually bothered about learning Latin -- the others just came for the community, and had to be encouraged a bit to try to learn anything!
    Though I have my fair share of the blame for playing hide-and-seek, making sheet togae and drawing cartoon characters on the board :p:

    (Original post by Sappho)
    Sports? Are you ill or something?
    :awesome:
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    (Original post by placenta medicae talpae)
    I wonder how much benefit there would be if kids were taught Latin from an early age?
    I'm always very sceptical of claims that teaching French from Y2 onwards would be so much better and that it's the "best time to learn" because they'd spend about 5 years learning basic stuff and end up frustrated with it all because they still can't string a sentence together!
    Definitely growing up in a French-speaking environment would be better than learning it later, but as for classroom-based teaching from an early age, I'm not so sure.
    (Though this might be one of those time-honoured debates classicists are faced with from time to time -- in which case feel free to ignore!)

    When I held a lunchtime 'Latin club' in my school, it was immense fun, but only one of the people attending was actually bothered about learning Latin -- the others just came for the community, and had to be encouraged a bit to even try to learn anything!
    Though I have my fair share of the blame for playing hide-and-seek, making sheet togae and drawing cartoon characters on the board :p:


    :awesome:
    I couldn't agree more!

    I started doing Latin when I was 12/13, and that was early enough for me to get a feeling for the language, but late enough to be able to understand what grammar is, and how it works. I started French two years later, and am much more fluent in French than I am in Latin (though I acknowledge that learning rench was much easier with the Latin background).
    I started doing English when I was 10/11 and that was definitely early enough. My little hist brother in France was 11 and had been 'learning English' for quite a while, but it was exactly as you say! They taught them silly words, and they were unable to write a little text, which just frustrated them totally. And then in my year (that was the penultimate school year), people's English was desastrous.

    I don't think that doing Latin really early makes much sense. As a child certainly, but not when they don't understand what a verb or noun is etc. I am not sure whether it's a great first foreign language tbh. I would probably have been sad if other children had been able to talk to people in another language whereas I translated endless senseless texts. But as a second foreign language, it's certainly great and a good basis for all the others.

    PS: WE'LL HAVE LATIN CONVERSATION ATER THE HOLIDAYS!!! :woo:
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    Well I doubt there's a significant advantage to be had inculcating Latin in children from a young age. You see there are significant problems with how its taught in general and, of course, the overblown claims of what it gives to those who learn it.

    I think regardless I might teach my (eventual) kids some simply because Latin is a part and parcel of my daily life in terms of note taking etc. Well, if my cat can understand Latin commands so will my children, basically.
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    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    Well I doubt there's a significant advantage to be had inculcating Latin in children from a young age. You see there are significant problems with how its taught in general and, of course, the overblown claims of what it gives to those who learn it.

    I think regardless I might teach my (eventual) kids some simply because Latin is a part and parcel of my daily life in terms of note taking etc. Well, if my cat can understand Latin commands so will my children, basically.
    Haven't tried Latin, but my dog is fine with French.

    It all depends on how you define young age I guess.

    PS: PRSOM :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Aha, are these the final exams? Good luck with them, Dragon.
    Fortunately(I think) they are only my second year exams, I took a gap year so I am a year behind my peers. However thankyou, I suspect I will need it.

    :shakecane: a new smilie! I shall use this to display my annoyance at my timetable.
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    Oh, also, you probably don't care but for that essay on Polybios I was desperate about, I got it back yesterday and my tutor thought it was good. Yay! Take it as a good sign for your work
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    (Original post by Sappho)
    Oh, also, you probably don't care but for that essay on Polybios I was desperate about, I got it back yesterday and my tutor thought it was good. Yay! Take it as a good sign for your work
    Lol of course I care, that's great news! Keep it up, now you have to try to beat those marks with the next one.
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    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    Lol of course I care, that's great news! Keep it up, now you have to try to beat those marks with the next one.
    Thank you!

    I shall, I shall, I'll probably be writing on Cicero or oratory :suith:
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    (Original post by Sappho)
    Thank you!

    I shall, I shall, I'll probably be writing on Cicero or oratory :suith:
    Well you're moving outside of my areas of interest/expertise there so I can't really offer much help unless you want socio-linguistics in Cicero or how Greek oratorical theory was adapted.

    On the other hand there is a gigantic mass of literature, D A Russel, Powel et all. In fact for the best possible beginnings check out Powell's article on legal/rhetorical Latin in the the Blackwell Comp to the Latin Language.
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    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    Well you're moving outside of my areas of interest/expertise there so I can't really offer much help unless you want socio-linguistics in Cicero or how Greek oratorical theory was adapted.

    On the other hand there is a gigantic mass of literature, D A Russel, Powel et all. In fact for the best possible beginnings check out Powell's article on legal/rhetorical Latin in the the Blackwell Comp to the Latin Language.
    I shall start with In Catilinam and De Coniuratione Catilinae I think.
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    All you guys talking about your complex essays and I'm sat here fearing the essay I have to do on Greek inscriptions soon... Scary!

    I hate coming home sometimes. I love seeing my boyfriend, but I have this essay to do and no library to access here and I just want it done because I have no idea what to write. Thought I think very few people are planning to do my essay, so the books should still be in the library. Everyone else is doing what they think is an easy essay about oral tradition in the Illiad, but I like actually reading the texts too much to analyse them...
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    (Original post by skunky x)
    All you guys talking about your complex essays and I'm sat here fearing the essay I have to do on Greek inscriptions soon... Scary!

    I hate coming home sometimes. I love seeing my boyfriend, but I have this essay to do and no library to access here and I just want it done because I have no idea what to write. Thought I think very few people are planning to do my essay, so the books should still be in the library. Everyone else is doing what they think is an easy essay about oral tradition in the Illiad, but I like actually reading the texts too much to analyse them...
    Erm you realise Homeric Philology pretty much kills every other area of Classics regarding complexity right?

    Analysis shouldn't kill the joy, but help you enjoy the texts more. I think its because you're in the middle of all your work right now and obviously that adds a massive dampener.

    Good luck with the inscriptions.
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    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    Erm you realise Homeric Philology pretty much kills every other area of Classics regarding complexity right?

    Analysis shouldn't kill the joy, but help you enjoy the texts more. I think its because you're in the middle of all your work right now and obviously that adds a massive dampener.

    Good luck with the inscriptions.
    That's why I said 'They think' I've made the mistake of trying to do the 'easy' question before and ended up wanting to kill myself over it. Now I just go for what seems interesting, and inscriptions - especially like the Gortyn Law code and the Athenian Tribute Lists interest me - why they hell write down and display stuff that modern people wouldn't find interesting/bother to read at all?

    Yes, I'm this rubbish at Classics... Such a newbie to all of this.
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    (Original post by skunky x)
    That's why I said 'They think' I've made the mistake of trying to do the 'easy' question before and ended up wanting to kill myself over it. Now I just go for what seems interesting, and inscriptions - especially like the Gortyn Law code and the Athenian Tribute Lists interest me - why they hell write down and display stuff that modern people wouldn't find interesting/bother to read at all?

    Yes, I'm this rubbish at Classics... Such a newbie to all of this.
    You've made my awesome list. High-5 for Gortyn! I studied ancient Greek Legal systems in some depth during my second year and was constantly viewing this stuff. It's great isn't it? Honestly when it comes to knowledge of Greek culture I'd take the guy who's gone over some of that stuff over the one who's read Euripides a million times.

    Good on you. Is this a specific thing or are you studying the legal systems in general? How are you finding MacDowell, Gagarin et al?
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    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    You've made my awesome list. High-5 for Gortyn! I studied ancient Greek Legal systems in some depth during my second year and was constantly viewing this stuff. It's great isn't it? Honestly when it comes to knowledge of Greek culture I'd take the guy who's gone over some of that stuff over the one who's read Euripides a million times.

    Good on you. Is this a specific thing or are you studying the legal systems in general? How are you finding MacDowell, Gagarin et al?
    The thing is, I would usually class myself as a Romanist, but I find the origin of democracy and the concept of centralised laws and courts really interesting. It's the whole development of an entirely new system that just fascinates me.

    It's for a module called Text and Object about how we have ancient texts now. The question is Did it matter where and how inscriptions were displayed in Classical Athens? It's either that one or How important was literacy to the functioning of Athenian democracy? I'm only a little first year so it's only 2500 words - all very basic stuff I imagine....
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    Still got a history essay to do for Friday but finished my one for Latin also on Friday, just need to make sure my footnotes and bibliography are correctly formatted.

    Also got a supervisor for my dissertation in two years time (on year abroad next year).
    Just need a little bit more focus I feel, I want to look at the social and economical effects on Ostia after the Roman Imperial port moved to Portus. Just really need a time frame now.

    I am sad that I'm going to be missing my Classical Literature in Translation group tomorrow as I really need to work on my essay. Was going to be looking at Christopher Logue's War Music Book 1 and compare it to the version of the Iliad we looked at last week.
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    1) I learnt Welsh from a young age (5-11) and can only remember ****ty little remarks like 'I like fish/coffee', 'Hello, my name is...' and 'Hello class, hello friends'. If Latin is taught in the same way to young kids, it'll fail. The way I was taught Welsh was shocking - half an hour or maybe an hour a week, no continuity, no recapping. Just awful. I'm all for teaching young kids languages, but not in that way.

    2) Ancient Greek legal crap :love:

    I'll probably hate it once I get my essay on the ekklesia and law courts back though.
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    (Original post by Aemiliana)
    1) I learnt Welsh from a young age (5-11) and can only remember ****ty little remarks like 'I like fish/coffee', 'Hello, my name is...' and 'Hello class, hello friends'. If Latin is taught in the same way to young kids, it'll fail. The way I was taught Welsh was shocking - half an hour or maybe an hour a week, no continuity, no recapping. Just awful. I'm all for teaching young kids languages, but not in that way.

    2) Ancient Greek legal crap :love:

    I'll probably hate it once I get my essay on the ekklesia and law courts back though.
    Ah well my knowledge of how Latin is taught pre-uni is obviously non existent, and I'm aware at how bizarre my Latin experience has been (speaking and writing so much) compared to most. Like I said, my cats respond rather well to it. Well most of my cats do, this one always waits for me to finish and then attacks me. But the other two are like "ita vero, domine!". Well "miaw" but you get the idea.

    The trick with Greek law is to get a good overview and then focus on a particular "approach" you love. So for me it was mainly religion since that's one of my major research aims but it tends to stick things together better than trying to retain it all. Trying formalistic analysis of the mechanical stuff (Ekklesia etc) can be mind numbing and I have nothing but annoyance at those memories.

    Have you tried role playing cases? Well not acting them out but take a speech and plot all the legal machimata used, and then do it for a similar case and see if it all adds up. (Hint: it rarely does).

    People doing Roman Law have it so much easier. It's so much more sensible and non "LOL I WILL DO WHATEVER I WANT, SUCK IT" in nature. I mean typical Roman example is something like.

    Quintus sells Lucius a slave claiming he's healthy.
    Slave dies. Lucius takes Quintus takes his case to an advocate who advises him.
    Law court for misrepresentation.

    Sensible. The Greek example:

    Artemidotos buys 6 figs from Laoerges.
    2 figs were rotten.
    Artem. takes Lao. to court for trying to subvert the democracy,
    Lao. accuses Artem of beating his own parents and sexual deviancy.
    Artem. replies that Laos mother was a prostitute.
    3 generations later people are still fighting in courts. Speech-writers get loaded.
 
 
 
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