Turn on thread page Beta

Will the real TeeEm please stand up! watch

  • View Poll Results: will the real TeeEm please stand up
    man on the desk
    19
    6.76%
    man in the library with lap top
    69
    24.56%
    man 3
    13
    4.63%
    bodybuilder
    43
    15.30%
    donkey
    52
    18.51%
    man eating sandwich
    25
    8.90%
    ginger
    60
    21.35%

    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    number theory is pure maths and I do not do pure maths ...
    On a serious note I have an amazing book on number theory, but the problem is that is not in English.
    Ah, not to worry, the book Physicsmaths recommended looks great
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    Ah, not to worry, the book Physicsmaths recommended looks great
    maybe I also have the title?
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    Ah, not to worry, the book Physicsmaths recommended looks great
    Art of problem solving is one of the best sites out there. Wonderful.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    maybe I also have the title?
    Art of Problem Solving Intro to Number Theory. I think the only UK stockist of AoPS books is UKMT here. It is quite expensive but looks like the kind of book you keep forever.
    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Art of problem solving is one of the best sites out there. Wonderful.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I have had a look at there books in the past, they do look brilliant. Just trying to decide what maths I want to spend time ding; STEP 1 prep or some number theory/olympiad type problems.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    Art of Problem Solving Intro to Number Theory. I think the only UK stockist of AoPS books is UKMT here. It is quite expensive but looks like the kind of book you keep forever.
    .
    thanks
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    Art of Problem Solving Intro to Number Theory. I think the only UK stockist of AoPS books is UKMT here. It is quite expensive but looks like the kind of book you keep forever.


    I have had a look at there books in the past, they do look brilliant. Just trying to decide what maths I want to spend time ding; STEP 1 prep or some number theory/olympiad type problems.
    Most people who do well in olympids do well in step.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by physicsmaths)
    Most people who do well in olympids do well in step.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'm just not sure where to start with olympiad type problems. perhaps I should work through AoPS Vol 1
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    hey TeeEm
    what yeam do you support?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    x
    I dont suppose you have any questions on moments acting on a lamina? I did flip through your moments booklet but they were mainly M1 type problems. Had a very hard question today from the old M2 book.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    I dont suppose you have any questions on moments acting on a lamina? I did flip through your moments booklet but they were mainly M1 type problems. Had a very hard question today from the old M2 book.
    these are very rare and not too hard
    there may be parts of questions of what you are describing with centre of mass workbooks in M2 and in M3
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    I dont suppose you have any questions on moments acting on a lamina? I did flip through your moments booklet but they were mainly M1 type problems. Had a very hard question today from the old M2 book.
    Is it the part after finding the centre of mass that is giving you grief? What sort of a question was it, hanging it up, balancing it on a slope (I've always thought that this wouldn't work in practice) or attaching a stud and then hanging it up?
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    Is it the part after finding the centre of mass that is giving you grief? What sort of a question was it, hanging it up, balancing it on a slope (I've always thought that this wouldn't work in practice) or attaching a stud and then hanging it up?
    There was a rectangular lamina lent up against a wall. It was basically a ladder problem with rough ground but the ladder was a rectangular lamina. The difficulty lies in the line of action of its weight because it came down from the CoM of the rectangle.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    these are very rare and not too hard
    there may be parts of questions of what you are describing with centre of mass workbooks in M2 and in M3
    Ok will have a quick look 👍
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    Ok will have a quick look 👍
    I will make a question like that...
    I remember in the early nineties a question with a wardrobe leaning against a wall
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    There was a rectangular lamina lent up against a wall. It was basically a ladder problem with rough ground but the ladder was a rectangular lamina. The difficulty lies in the line of action of its weight because it came down from the CoM of the rectangle.
    I seem to have every old Mechanics book except that one.

    Attached is a diagram of what I think you've got. I've put on 4 forces, the weight of the lamina, the reactions at the wall and the ground and the friction at the ground.

    I'm guessing that what is giving you grief is finding a suitable distance when taking moments for the weight. If you take moments about A, the distance you need is the distance from the centre of mass to the wall, GB. This is a side of the triangle that I have drawn, with hypotenuse AG. The angle between AG and the wall is alpha + beta. Alpha is the angle between the side of the lamina and the vertical, which I guess is what you are trying to find. beta depends on the dimensions of the rectangle.

    Does that help at all?
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: doc rectangular lamina.doc (39.0 KB, 66 views)
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    There was a rectangular lamina lent up against a wall. It was basically a ladder problem with rough ground but the ladder was a rectangular lamina. The difficulty lies in the line of action of its weight because it came down from the CoM of the rectangle.
    Like question 9 here?
    Offline

    22
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Krollo)
    Like question 9 here?
    Off topic, but Q10 on that paper was a real beauty.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TeeEm)
    I will make a question like that...
    I remember in the early nineties a question with a wardrobe leaning against a wall
    That was basically the setup
    (Original post by tiny hobbit)
    I seem to have every old Mechanics book except that one.

    Attached is a diagram of what I think you've got. I've put on 4 forces, the weight of the lamina, the reactions at the wall and the ground and the friction at the ground.

    I'm guessing that what is giving you grief is finding a suitable distance when taking moments for the weight. If you take moments about A, the distance you need is the distance from the centre of mass to the wall, GB. This is a side of the triangle that I have drawn, with hypotenuse AG. The angle between AG and the wall is alpha + beta. Alpha is the angle between the side of the lamina and the vertical, which I guess is what you are trying to find. beta depends on the dimensions of the rectangle.

    Does that help at all?
    Yep thats exactly what the question was like. Thanks for the diagram, I'll have another go using it tomorrow and see how I get on

    (Original post by Krollo)
    Like question 9 here?
    Yep was basically that
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    Another question came up in M2 today. It was Q29 of Review Exercise 2 in the old edexcel book, the 2000 one. The issue was dealing with the moments about O and how to deal with the centre of mass acting from the 'centre' of the rectangular lamina.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Gilo98)
    Another question came up in M2 today. It was Q29 of Review Exercise 2 in the old edexcel book, the 2000 one. The issue was dealing with the moments about O and how to deal with the centre of mass acting from the 'centre' of the rectangular lamina.
    one question I made and added earlier
    Attached Images
  2. File Type: pdf IMG.pdf (129.0 KB, 52 views)
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: August 22, 2017

1,470

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.