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pepeeglesfield
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(Original post by K FIZZLE)
How does an action potential travel along an axon? The explanation in the book is vague

I saw somewhere that the recently influxed sodium ions diffuse along the axon, causing the voltage gated sodium channels further long to open, but why does this cause them to open? Do they open in responce to a big change in voltage?

action potential generate a current which depolarises the membrane immediately adjacent, when depolarisation caused by the local currents reaches threshold, a new action potential is generated, but it is only propagated in one direction as the previous membrane is still in its refractory period
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samfreak
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(Original post by Castiel')
IAA - auxin (plant hormone) produced at the tips of shoots and roots

(looking at a shoot/root tip horizontally)

At the tips of shoots, it stimulates growth of cells by elongation. IAA at the tips of the shoots diffuse to the bottom half of the shoot , increasing growth of cells on the bottom half so that the bottom half of the shoot is longer than the top half and hence, curves upwards towards the light.

At the root tips, IAA inhibitis growth. IAA diffuses downwards to the bottom half of the root tip and inhibits growth of the bottom half of the root tip. Hence, the upper half of the root tip has grown more and so the whole root tip bends downwards towards gravity.
but doesnt IAA causes elongation if cells therefore more growth on the side withh IAA on? if IAA diffuses to the bottom half why would it inhibit growth on thr bottom half of the root tip?

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erniiee
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(Original post by mathsguy)
Can someone tell me everything I need to know on the DNA side of the course, we've been taught very fragmented. Also what do I need to know about the eye? Thanks in advance!
Have you not got a textbook? Refer to the BIOL5 section of the specification..DNA is 3.5.6-3.5.8.

http://filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects/AQA-2410-W-SP.PDF
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erniiee
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(Original post by HELPIMSTUCK)
Its not too late at all, panicking isn't going to help.

At my college we have been practicing for the essay by doing essay plans for some of the old essay titles. Hopefully one of the old essay titles will come up again (they have done for the past two years), but if it doesn't then we're supposed to know enough to create an essay from the things we do know.

Learn certain topics that relate to lots of possible essay titles i.e.
- CHOLERA - could be used on essays about importance of water, bacteria affect human lives, disease, osmosis, plasma membranes
- NITROGEN CYCLE - could be used on essay about inorganic ions, importance of nitrogen, cycles essay, the environment
- POLYSACCHARIDES - relates to carbohydrates and polymers essay

- If you read the specification AQA note certain topics that are assessed as part of "synoptic skills". They are found at the end of the details of each module under "biological principles" and are quite vague but you could think about how different topics relate to each other and could be used in an essay.

- Think back to any topics you "enjoyed" and learn the basics (you don't need that many details really, only 5 relevant points). You don't need to relearn all the content of units 1,2 and 4, and its probably going to waste precious revision time anyway.

- At this point there isn't that much point spending too much time on the essay, its probably better to focus on the unit 5 content (which is worth at least 75% of the UMS marks, possibly more if you write about it in an essay). But if you remember its there it could be worth up to 25 easy(ish) marks (it is just recall).

GOOD LUCK
Hey do you happen to have a list of the old spec essay titles?
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emah123
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#1565
(Original post by HELPIMSTUCK)
Its not too late at all, panicking isn't going to help.

At my college we have been practicing for the essay by doing essay plans for some of the old essay titles. Hopefully one of the old essay titles will come up again (they have done for the past two years), but if it doesn't then we're supposed to know enough to create an essay from the things we do know.

Learn certain topics that relate to lots of possible essay titles i.e.
- CHOLERA - could be used on essays about importance of water, bacteria affect human lives, disease, osmosis, plasma membranes
- NITROGEN CYCLE - could be used on essay about inorganic ions, importance of nitrogen, cycles essay, the environment
- POLYSACCHARIDES - relates to carbohydrates and polymers essay

- If you read the specification AQA note certain topics that are assessed as part of "synoptic skills". They are found at the end of the details of each module under "biological principles" and are quite vague but you could think about how different topics relate to each other and could be used in an essay.

- Think back to any topics you "enjoyed" and learn the basics (you don't need that many details really, only 5 relevant points). You don't need to relearn all the content of units 1,2 and 4, and its probably going to waste precious revision time anyway.

- At this point there isn't that much point spending too much time on the essay, its probably better to focus on the unit 5 content (which is worth at least 75% of the UMS marks, possibly more if you write about it in an essay). But if you remember its there it could be worth up to 25 easy(ish) marks (it is just recall).

GOOD LUCK
THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!!!!! Your the best!!!!
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HELPIMSTUCK
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(Original post by erniiee)
Hey do you happen to have a list of the old spec essay titles?
SPECIFICATION A
Spoiler:
Show

- The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms

- How nitrogen-containing substances are made available to and are used by living organisms

- Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems

- Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance

- Describe how nitrogen-containing substances are taken into, and metabolised in, animals and plants.

-Inorganic ions include those of sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.

- Bacteria affect the lives of humans and other organisms in many ways. Apart from causing disease, describe how bacteria may affect the lives of humans and other organisms.

- Polymers have different structures. They also have different functions.Describe how the structures of different polymers are related to their functions.

- The structure and functions of carbohydrates

- Cycles in biology

- How carbon dioxide gets from a respiring cell to the lumen of an alveolus in the lungs

- How an amino acid gets from protein in a person’s food to becoming part of a human protein in that person

- Heat and many different substances are transferred within the human body and between the body and the environment. Explain how surface area is linked to this transfer.

- The transfer of energy between different organisms and between these organisms and their environment

- Ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other

- Negative feedback and its importance in biology

- Condensation and hydrolysis and their importance in biology

- Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems

- Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance

- The different ways in which organisms use ATP

- How the structure of cells is related to their function

- How bacteria affect human lives

- The biological importance of water



SPECIFICATION B
Spoiler:
Show


- The part played by the movement of substances across cell membranes in the
functioning of different organs and organ systems.

- The part played by enzymes in the functioning of different cells, tissues and organs.

- Movements inside cells.

- Transfers through ecosystems.

- The transfer of substances containing carbon between organisms and between organisms and the environment

- Cells are easy to distinguish by their shape. How are the shapes of cells related to their function?

- How microscopes have contributed to our understanding of living organisms

- Enzymes and their importance in plants and animals

- Negative feedback in living organisms

- Mean temperatures are rising in many parts of the world. The rising temperatures may
result in physiological and ecological effects on living organisms. Describe and explain
these effects.

- The biological importance of water.

- The movement of substances within living organisms.


- There may be more which I have not found. We did the specification A ones in college
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master y
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Hi , just wondering what you lot would give me out of 25 for this essay?
Spoiler:
Show
The causes of disease (June 2010)
Disease is a generic term for a condition which an organism has due to the abnormal function of cells, organ or system which usually has adverse impacts. This essay will highlight the genetic factors, pathogens, and lifestyle choices in the causation of disease.

DNA is a sequence of bases, where each triplet codes for an amino acid. The sequence of amino acids, or the primary structure of a protein, determines the structure and therefore function of a protein. Mutations are spontaneous and rarely dramatically affect the sequence of amino acids which is translated due to the degenerate nature of DNA. Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary autosomal recessive disease, caused by a deletion mutation of the CFTR gene which codes for transporting chloride ions out of epithelial cells. Water remains in the cell and does not move out by osmosis, since there is a high concentration of salt ions inside the cell. This results in a sticky mucus produced on the epithelial membranes which cause the classic symptom for cystic fibrosis – a chesty cough, and since the mucus surrounds major organs in the digestive system such as the pancreas, enzymes are unable to leave to digest the macromolecules into smaller soluble molecules.

Cancer is another genetic disease. Proto-oncogenes are genes which regulate cell division. If they are mutated they become oncogenes which may cause uncontrolled cell division in two ways; coding for excessive numbers of growth factors, or causing the receptor protein on the cell surface membrane to be permanently activated. Hence, a malignant tumour may grow due to uncontrolled mitosis of cancer cells. A specific example is the BRCA gene associated with breast cancer.
In addition, pathogens such as bacteria and viruses may cause disease. The two common methods to cause disease are to secrete harmful toxins and to harm healthy cells. They can be transmitted in many ways, the first of which is by droplet infection. Droplets may contain viruses which can then enter the body through the gas exchange system. From here, the virus can inject DNA or RNA into host cells, allowing them to replicate and destroy the healthy host cells. An example of this virus, is influenza. Pathogens may also be transmitted through contaminated water. For example the bacteria which cause cholera, vibrio cholerae, releases a toxin which binds to specific complementary receptors in the cell surface membranes of epithelial cells in the small intestine. This opens the chloride channels, so chloride ions diffuse out into the lumen. This causes an increased water potential inside the cell, so water leaves by osmosis. Consequently, this results in severe dehydration and diarrhoea. Other ways to transport disease is by sexual contact which can transfer sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia and through animal contact - for example rabies can be transferred from dog bites.

Lifestyle factors can majorly influence the risks of disease. Examples include excessive exposure to UV from sunlight may contribute to skin cancer since this can mutate the DNA in skin cells, smoking, obesity, the amount of saturated fats in diet, salt intake in diet (may increase blood pressure) cholesterol levels and low physical activity. If an individual lives by one or more of these lifestyle choices, then they are at more at risk of coronary heart disease, strokes (potentially caused by thrombosis), diabetes and a myocardial infarction (can be caused by atheroma, which is fatty deposits of cholesterol in the endothelium of the coronary arteries). Family history may also influence the likelihood of disease, therefore this links genetics with lifestyle choices.

Lung function may also be damaged resulting in diseases such as emphysema. Smoking majorly contributes to the disease, since the cigarette consist of chemicals which damage the elastin in the alveoli hence they become permanently stretched. The alveoli’s surface area is reduced, and may burst. As a result emphysema sufferers have insufficient gas exchange, therefore often find themselves out of breath.
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master y
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Spoiler:
Show
(Original post by HELPIMSTUCK)
SPECIFICATION A
Spoiler:
Show

- The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms

- How nitrogen-containing substances are made available to and are used by living organisms

- Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems

- Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance

- Describe how nitrogen-containing substances are taken into, and metabolised in, animals and plants.

-Inorganic ions include those of sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.

- Bacteria affect the lives of humans and other organisms in many ways. Apart from causing disease, describe how bacteria may affect the lives of humans and other organisms.

- Polymers have different structures. They also have different functions.Describe how the structures of different polymers are related to their functions.

- The structure and functions of carbohydrates

- Cycles in biology

- How carbon dioxide gets from a respiring cell to the lumen of an alveolus in the lungs

- How an amino acid gets from protein in a person’s food to becoming part of a human protein in that person

- Heat and many different substances are transferred within the human body and between the body and the environment. Explain how surface area is linked to this transfer.

- The transfer of energy between different organisms and between these organisms and their environment

- Ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other

- Negative feedback and its importance in biology

- Condensation and hydrolysis and their importance in biology

- Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems

- Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance

- The different ways in which organisms use ATP

- How the structure of cells is related to their function

- How bacteria affect human lives

- The biological importance of water



SPECIFICATION B
Spoiler:
Show


- The part played by the movement of substances across cell membranes in the
functioning of different organs and organ systems.

- The part played by enzymes in the functioning of different cells, tissues and organs.

- Movements inside cells.

- Transfers through ecosystems.

- The transfer of substances containing carbon between organisms and between organisms and the environment

- Cells are easy to distinguish by their shape. How are the shapes of cells related to their function?

- How microscopes have contributed to our understanding of living organisms

- Enzymes and their importance in plants and animals

- Negative feedback in living organisms

- Mean temperatures are rising in many parts of the world. The rising temperatures may
result in physiological and ecological effects on living organisms. Describe and explain
these effects.

- The biological importance of water.

- The movement of substances within living organisms.


- There may be more which I have not found. We did the specification A ones in college

(Original post by erniiee)
Hey do you happen to have a list of the old spec essay titles?

(Original post by samfreak)
but doesnt IAA causes elongation if cells therefore more growth on the side withh IAA on? if IAA diffuses to the bottom half why would it inhibit growth on thr bottom half of the root tip?

Posted from TSR Mobile

(Original post by pepeeglesfield)
action potential generate a current which depolarises the membrane immediately adjacent, when depolarisation caused by the local currents reaches threshold, a new action potential is generated, but it is only propagated in one direction as the previous membrane is still in its refractory period

(Original post by HELPIMSTUCK)
SPECIFICATION A
Spoiler:
Show

- The importance of hydrogen bonds in living organisms

- How nitrogen-containing substances are made available to and are used by living organisms

- Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems

- Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance

- Describe how nitrogen-containing substances are taken into, and metabolised in, animals and plants.

-Inorganic ions include those of sodium, phosphorus and hydrogen. Describe how these and other inorganic ions are used in living organisms.

- Bacteria affect the lives of humans and other organisms in many ways. Apart from causing disease, describe how bacteria may affect the lives of humans and other organisms.

- Polymers have different structures. They also have different functions.Describe how the structures of different polymers are related to their functions.

- The structure and functions of carbohydrates

- Cycles in biology

- How carbon dioxide gets from a respiring cell to the lumen of an alveolus in the lungs

- How an amino acid gets from protein in a person’s food to becoming part of a human protein in that person

- Heat and many different substances are transferred within the human body and between the body and the environment. Explain how surface area is linked to this transfer.

- The transfer of energy between different organisms and between these organisms and their environment

- Ways in which different species of organisms differ from each other

- Negative feedback and its importance in biology

- Condensation and hydrolysis and their importance in biology

- Carbon dioxide in organisms and ecosystems

- Why offspring produced by the same parents are different in appearance

- The different ways in which organisms use ATP

- How the structure of cells is related to their function

- How bacteria affect human lives

- The biological importance of water



SPECIFICATION B
Spoiler:
Show


- The part played by the movement of substances across cell membranes in the
functioning of different organs and organ systems.

- The part played by enzymes in the functioning of different cells, tissues and organs.

- Movements inside cells.

- Transfers through ecosystems.

- The transfer of substances containing carbon between organisms and between organisms and the environment

- Cells are easy to distinguish by their shape. How are the shapes of cells related to their function?

- How microscopes have contributed to our understanding of living organisms

- Enzymes and their importance in plants and animals

- Negative feedback in living organisms

- Mean temperatures are rising in many parts of the world. The rising temperatures may
result in physiological and ecological effects on living organisms. Describe and explain
these effects.

- The biological importance of water.

- The movement of substances within living organisms.


- There may be more which I have not found. We did the specification A ones in college


Please look at my above post, would appreciate a lot!
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Medicine hopeful
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#1569
if this is from memory then very impressive! range of modules, well structured! seems to be quite broad aswell, dont know about a mark but youre seemingly in the right direction!
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cheesypuff
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Ok so , I need 25/25 in the essay

does anyone have useful tips for the essay bar include stuff out of the spec?
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HELPIMSTUCK
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(Original post by master y)
Hi , just wondering what you lot would give me out of 25 for this essay?
Spoiler:
Show
The causes of disease (June 2010)
Disease is a generic term for a condition which an organism has due to the abnormal function of cells, organ or system which usually has adverse impacts. This essay will highlight the genetic factors, pathogens, and lifestyle choices in the causation of disease.

DNA is a sequence of bases, where each triplet codes for an amino acid. The sequence of amino acids, or the primary structure of a protein, determines the structure and therefore function of a protein. Mutations are spontaneous and rarely dramatically affect the sequence of amino acids which is translated due to the degenerate nature of DNA. Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary autosomal recessive disease, caused by a deletion mutation of the CFTR gene which codes for transporting chloride ions out of epithelial cells. Water remains in the cell and does not move out by osmosis, since there is a high concentration of salt ions inside the cell. This results in a sticky mucus produced on the epithelial membranes which cause the classic symptom for cystic fibrosis – a chesty cough, and since the mucus surrounds major organs in the digestive system such as the pancreas, enzymes are unable to leave to digest the macromolecules into smaller soluble molecules.

Cancer is another genetic disease. Proto-oncogenes are genes which regulate cell division. If they are mutated they become oncogenes which may cause uncontrolled cell division in two ways; coding for excessive numbers of growth factors, or causing the receptor protein on the cell surface membrane to be permanently activated. Hence, a malignant tumour may grow due to uncontrolled mitosis of cancer cells. A specific example is the BRCA gene associated with breast cancer.
In addition, pathogens such as bacteria and viruses may cause disease. The two common methods to cause disease are to secrete harmful toxins and to harm healthy cells. They can be transmitted in many ways, the first of which is by droplet infection. Droplets may contain viruses which can then enter the body through the gas exchange system. From here, the virus can inject DNA or RNA into host cells, allowing them to replicate and destroy the healthy host cells. An example of this virus, is influenza. Pathogens may also be transmitted through contaminated water. For example the bacteria which cause cholera, vibrio cholerae, releases a toxin which binds to specific complementary receptors in the cell surface membranes of epithelial cells in the small intestine. This opens the chloride channels, so chloride ions diffuse out into the lumen. This causes an increased water potential inside the cell, so water leaves by osmosis. Consequently, this results in severe dehydration and diarrhoea. Other ways to transport disease is by sexual contact which can transfer sexually transmitted diseases such as chlamydia and through animal contact - for example rabies can be transferred from dog bites.

Lifestyle factors can majorly influence the risks of disease. Examples include excessive exposure to UV from sunlight may contribute to skin cancer since this can mutate the DNA in skin cells, smoking, obesity, the amount of saturated fats in diet, salt intake in diet (may increase blood pressure) cholesterol levels and low physical activity. If an individual lives by one or more of these lifestyle choices, then they are at more at risk of coronary heart disease, strokes (potentially caused by thrombosis), diabetes and a myocardial infarction (can be caused by atheroma, which is fatty deposits of cholesterol in the endothelium of the coronary arteries). Family history may also influence the likelihood of disease, therefore this links genetics with lifestyle choices.

Lung function may also be damaged resulting in diseases such as emphysema. Smoking majorly contributes to the disease, since the cigarette consist of chemicals which damage the elastin in the alveoli hence they become permanently stretched. The alveoli’s surface area is reduced, and may burst. As a result emphysema sufferers have insufficient gas exchange, therefore often find themselves out of breath.
It would probably be worth at least 20, 22-23 (not that I really know)
- I wouldn't bother much with an introduction, your not going to get any marks for it
- the stuff about DNA and proteins at the start of the 2nd paragraph isn't really relevant - this is mentioned on the June 10 exam report
- the cancer and emphysema sections seem a bit short, could probably be beefed up abit
- the paragraph on lifestyle factors is a bit flaky, you've just listed lots of factors and the problems they can cause without going into detail. Maybe it would be better to chose a couple of lifestyle factors and write about them in detail rather than list everything you can think of. Similarly you didn't really go into enough details about STDs.
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master y
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(Original post by HELPIMSTUCK)
It would probably be worth at least 20, 22-23 (not that I really know)
- I wouldn't bother much with an introduction, your not going to get any marks for it
- the stuff about DNA and proteins at the start of the 2nd paragraph isn't really relevant - this is mentioned on the June 10 exam report
- the cancer and emphysema sections seem a bit short, could probably be beefed up abit
- the paragraph on lifestyle factors is a bit flaky, you've just listed lots of factors and the problems they can cause without going into detail. Maybe it would be better to chose a couple of lifestyle factors and write about them in detail rather than list everything you can think of. Similarly you didn't really go into enough details about STDs.
Thanks for your feedback. I sent this to my teacher, and i was given 13/25 for this... just wanted someone else's opinion on my essay.
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HELPIMSTUCK
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(Original post by master y)
Thanks for your feedback. I sent this to my teacher, and i was given 13/25 for this... just wanted someone else's opinion on my essay.
:eek: Did your teacher give you any other feedback?
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master y
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(Original post by HELPIMSTUCK)
:eek: Did your teacher give you any other feedback?
yeah she said the last few paragraphs need to be more specific...eg which lifestyle choice links to what risk etc. fair point. For scientific knowledge i got 8/16... do you think this is fair? Anyone? Feeling a bit depressed about it now..
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Castiel'
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(Original post by samfreak)
but doesnt IAA causes elongation if cells therefore more growth on the side withh IAA on? if IAA diffuses to the bottom half why would it inhibit growth on thr bottom half of the root tip?

Posted from TSR Mobile
IAA inhibits cell growth in root tips (when IAA conc. is high) and IAA increases cell growth in the tips of shoots.
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loveheartsandall
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Hi everyone, this is a question about unit 4 but I couldn't find the thread for it. I'm guessing you're all doing unit 4 or have done it anyway??? My school has decided to do the whole course at the end of the year ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!


Anyway can anyone answer this question from the Jan 2011 Unit 4 paper?

"Residual food intake RFI is the different between the amount of food an animal actually eats and its expected food intake based on its size and growth rate. Scientists have selectively bred cattle for low RFI.

When RFI is calculated, low values are negative. Explain why there are negative."

WHY??? I've looked on the mark scheme and it says "amount of food take in is less than expected" but this doesn't make sense to me

Please can someone explain?? Many thanks
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master y
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(Original post by Castiel')
IAA inhibits cell growth in root tips (when IAA conc. is high) and IAA increases cell growth in the tips of shoots.
is IAA a hormone or a growth factor thingy?
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HELPIMSTUCK
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(Original post by master y)
yeah she said the last few paragraphs need to be more specific...eg which lifestyle choice links to what risk etc. fair point. For scientific knowledge i got 8/16... do you think this is fair? Anyone? Feeling a bit depressed about it now..
I think 8 is a bit low. The mediocre essay from the AQA website got 8 and yours was definitely better.

- Maybe use more technical scientific vocabulary - prokaryotic cell, intrinsic protein, plasma membranes, etc
- Sometimes your expression was poor; "If an individual lives by one or more of these lifestyle choices, then they are at more at risk of .... ","As a result emphysema sufferers have insufficient gas exchange" :confused:
- "An example of this virus, is influenza" - what is this comma for? Lose one mark
- "Majorly" is slang
- Write more ....
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JoshL123
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#1579
(Original post by master y)
is IAA a hormone or a growth factor thingy?
IAA is an auxin, so a growth regulating factor
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JenLivYoung
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#1580
(Original post by cheesypuff)
Ok so , I need 25/25 in the essay

does anyone have useful tips for the essay bar include stuff out of the spec?
Hey! From the mark scheme I was given by my teacher, I got told that there's only 2 extra marks for out of spec stuff, so personally I wouldn't stress about learning reams, just read round a bit and see if there's anything relevant that you could maybe include, but I wouldn't panic if you can't fit it in on the day
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