Doctors. Don't assume they are right! Watch

Magnanimity
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#141
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#141
(Original post by Renal)
If any of you are ever unlucky enough to be hit by a bus - make sure you mention this to the ambo crew before they deliver you to hossie.
Missing coeliacs + sjogrens for 11-12 years is a pretty fundamental error, no? My GP would still be chirping on about anxiety had I not asked to be referred. And they still won't give me prescription flour because it's 'too expensive'

It's good to question sometimes.
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Trigger
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#142
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#142
(Original post by danny111)
i am arrogant for saying what i think?
The fact that you expect us to believe such crap is pretty arrogant.
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Ribbits
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#143
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#143
(Original post by Tsoert)
Just a quick $0.02 - just because you're unable to swallow etc doesn't mean that its bacterial. If it isn't bacterial the only benefit you would be getting from antibiotics is placebo effect, whilst also contributing to the next "superbug". GP's have to run a careful balance between preserving public health and serving the patient in front of them, which occasionally means annoying a patient by refusing them drugs.
Which is fair enough, I understand why she has to be careful.
It doesn't sound like it from my posts, but I am actually very reluctant to resort to drugs compared to most people. I was just a sickly child so I have been sick far more frequently than most people too. Most of the time I wouldn't take drugs - sometimes it would just be too painful/difficult without.
The same issues don't apply to diagnosing Aneamia and Epilepsy though. Perhaps it is partly because we are meek people who really don't like to complain and will downplay problems.
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danny111
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#144
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#144
(Original post by Trigger)
The fact that you expect us to believe such crap is pretty arrogant.
a) the "crap" is actually true. why is it arrogant to write my opinion (which is what it is, only that it is not based on books, or whatever, but my parents) then you might as well say anyone is arrogant for writing their opinion.

b) the "crap" is crap, then i would be trolling.
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Trigger
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#145
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#145
(Original post by danny111)
a) the "crap" is actually true. why is it arrogant to write my opinion (which is what it is, only that it is not based on books, or whatever, but my parents) then you might as well say anyone is arrogant for writing their opinion.

b) the "crap" is crap, then i would be trolling.
So two grown adults with proper careers sit down in front of their son and take the piss out of their colleagues? Nice. Good to know that all people from all walks of life can be dicks.
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MBibzle
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#146
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#146
All of the doctors you guys have been talking about seem to be cutting a lot of corners. The GMC urges a strict code of practice that none of these guys seem to be obeying.
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MittenKrust
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#147
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#147
I dont think its completly that GP's dont care but in my experience from doing charity work with my family with people with drug problems, most GP's only assess on their current knowledge and is mainly a game of memory, if they dont know something they wont admit it and just give opinions on "similar" experiences and often in the cases I have studied people have either often almost died or had serious long term effects due to misdiagnosis.

Yes GP's make mistakes but most of them and most of the time fail to learn how to learn from them and seem to be stuck in the old fashioned idea that since they are trained and in fantastic jobs with years of experience they can do no wrong.

I had one a few years back who told me my tiredness was due to me being unemployed so therefore that meant I slept in for 18 hours a day and lived off junk food(all lies as at the time I was eating healthily and having 8 hours a day sleep) and got very rude when I tried to say I dont do that he kept speaking over me saying he knows best.

I have depression and doctors flat out refuse to give me anything and put me on a 6 month waiting list which has now been over 3 years!(partly because I have moved towns 4 times) but told even though I said I was sometimes thinking of suicide and had a family history of depression, my brother once tried to commit sucide etc they were unsympathetic and told me to my face "I can prescribe you something, but I wont"
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Elynnor1811
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#148
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#148
i do not trust doctors at all.
i was misdiagnosed for over nine months.. and as a result i'm now facing a **** prognosis that could have been avoided.
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danny111
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#149
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#149
(Original post by Trigger)
So two grown adults with proper careers sit down in front of their son and take the piss out of their colleagues? Nice. Good to know that all people from all walks of life can be dicks.
if you dont wanna cry about it you laugh about it. or however the saying goes.
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Trigger
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#150
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#150
(Original post by danny111)
if you dont wanna cry about it you laugh about it. or however the saying goes.
Or just not believe that your parents are even DRs, you know, whatever...
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danny111
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#151
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#151
(Original post by Trigger)
Or just not believe that your parents are even DRs, you know, whatever...
believe what you want. but hope that when you need one you get one of the good ones.
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EdwardCurrent
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#152
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#152
Of course, whatever their credentials, you should never blindly assume anything anybody says to be correct without your own investigation and validation, especially when it is something as critical as your own health. It is safe only to assume that they are probably correct.
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Trigger
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#153
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#153
(Original post by danny111)
believe what you want. but hope that when you need one you get one of the good ones.
Im pretty sure i will. Or il ask one of the guys at work...you know whatever :p:
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Helenia
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#154
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#154
(Original post by Elynnor1811)
i do not trust doctors at all.
i was misdiagnosed for over nine months.. and as a result i'm now facing a **** prognosis that could have been avoided.
Or again, maybe, as we've pointed out, things weren't obvious at all initially?

(Original post by Magnanimity)
Missing coeliacs + sjogrens for 11-12 years is a pretty fundamental error, no? My GP would still be chirping on about anxiety had I not asked to be referred. And they still won't give me prescription flour because it's 'too expensive'

It's good to question sometimes.
Coeliacs yes - sjogrens is probably something most GPs will only come across a handful of times in their lifetime. Unfortunately the nature of coeliac disease means it often is not the first diagnosis that springs to mind (and shouldn't be) when a patient presents. However, in your case it seems you had a really awful time - sounds like the GP did the only-too-easy thing of assuming the initial hypothesis was right after all those years rather than going back to question it. :rolleyes:

In general though, I'm inclined to think that people haven't read the few posts in here from actual medics/doctors and really don't understand just how complex clinical medicine is.
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Awesome-o
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#155
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#155
I have a friend who had a nasty gardening accident which severed his leg clean off. The GP diagnosed him as having anxiety and it was only after 5 years of taking pills did my friend ask to be referred to a specialist who then correctly diagnosed him with a missing leg. After 5 years it got infected and now it's been too long to put the leg (which he retained in the freezer) back on. I bet this GP i still enjoying his 2 day working week and yacht in the south of france....
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Magnanimity
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#156
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#156
(Original post by Helenia)
Coeliacs yes - sjogrens is probably something most GPs will only come across a handful of times in their lifetime. Unfortunately the nature of coeliac disease means it often is not the first diagnosis that springs to mind (and shouldn't be) when a patient presents. However, in your case it seems you had a really awful time - sounds like the GP did the only-too-easy thing of assuming the initial hypothesis was right after all those years rather than going back to question it. :rolleyes:

In general though, I'm inclined to think that people haven't read the few posts in here from actual medics/doctors and really don't understand just how complex clinical medicine is.
My problem is that I was investigated at all. A basic blood test when I was 15 and that was it. I also don't think anxiety should be the first diagnosis for abdominal pain. I think one of the many GPs I saw at my practice could have referred me to a gastro for endoscopy/colonoscopy a lot earlier. You and I both know the risks of untreated coeliacs, and also the risk of sjogrens. And I already have generalised lymphadenopathy both superficial and deep which I was CT scanned for about 3 weeks ago pretty scary.

With the Sjogren's, I can understand missing that. However, having a raised ESR, AST, IgG, WBC - you might want to look into it rather than ignore it. I'm not saying Sjogrens would jump out at you but you might think hmm, I wonder where that inflammation is coming from. Indeed, my GP phoned me a few weeks after the rheumatologist diagnosis, telling me I had a normal blood result. I had to tell him no, I have Sjogrens, unless it's magically disappeared, they're not normal.

When my gastroenterologist saw the blood results, he went on and tested me and I had loads of rheumatoid factor swimming about and was anti-ro, anti-la +ve. It's not that big of a deal to know you have Sjogren's but if I'd gone on to have a kid, I might have got a shock, being anti-ro +ve and all

I think the point people are trying to make is that having a medical degree doesn't make you a good doctor. I don't think it should mean that their mistakes should be swept under the carpet because medicine is complex. I can understand their frustration because my life would have been a lot simpler. And I don't think coeliac's is so rare that it wouldn't be considered - especially with a family history I don't have a conscious memory prior to my diagnosis of a pain-free day, and that could easily have been avoided if my GP had just pulled the finger out and endoscopied me several years go.
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Trigger
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#157
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#157
Youre talking about one Dr though, its unfortunate that you had a tough time but thousands of other Drs are practising and practising well.
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Magnanimity
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#158
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#158
(Original post by Trigger)
Youre talking about one Dr though, its unfortunate that you had a tough time but thousands of other Drs are practising and practising well.
I actually have consulted every GP in my practice, both ones who have left and started new over the past 12 years, and it's a pretty big practice, employing about 8 doctors at a time. 'Change your GP' is the advice I've always been given and followed. To get the gastro referral (and at that, private) I actually had to bring my parents because otherwise they wouldn't listen or take me seriously.

I totally accept that there are good Drs, my gastroenterologist and rheumatologists in particular are amazing. It's GP's that have let me down so far because they never let me get access to the treatment I needed. And I still can't get prescription flour (which costs £10 for enough for 1 loaf to buy from the pharmacy) because it will cost the practice too much.

I do appreciate doctors. Just not **** ones.
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Trigger
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#159
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#159
(Original post by Magnanimity)
I actually have consulted every GP in my practice, both ones who have left and started new over the past 12 years, and it's a pretty big practice, employing about 8 doctors at a time. 'Change your GP' is the advice I've always been given and followed. To get the gastro referral (and at that, private) I actually had to bring my parents because otherwise they wouldn't listen or take me seriously.

I totally accept that there are good Drs, my gastroenterologist and rheumatologists in particular are amazing. It's GP's that have let me down so far because they never let me get access to the treatment I needed. And I still can't get prescription flour (which costs £10 for enough for 1 loaf to buy from the pharmacy) because it will cost the practice too much.

I do appreciate doctors. Just not **** ones.
I can understand that...can't you get wheat free food from the supermarket? Though i can see why they won't give you the flour that is pretty damn expensive when budgets are as tight as a ducks bum hole at the moment.
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MittenKrust
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#160
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#160
(Original post by Magnanimity)
My problem is that I was investigated at all. A basic blood test when I was 15 and that was it. I also don't think anxiety should be the first diagnosis for abdominal pain. I think one of the many GPs I saw at my practice could have referred me to a gastro for endoscopy/colonoscopy a lot earlier. You and I both know the risks of untreated coeliacs, and also the risk of sjogrens. And I already have generalised lymphadenopathy both superficial and deep which I was CT scanned for about 3 weeks ago pretty scary.

With the Sjogren's, I can understand missing that. However, having a raised ESR, AST, IgG, WBC - you might want to look into it rather than ignore it. I'm not saying Sjogrens would jump out at you but you might think hmm, I wonder where that inflammation is coming from. Indeed, my GP phoned me a few weeks after the rheumatologist diagnosis, telling me I had a normal blood result. I had to tell him no, I have Sjogrens, unless it's magically disappeared, they're not normal.

When my gastroenterologist saw the blood results, he went on and tested me and I had loads of rheumatoid factor swimming about and was anti-ro, anti-la +ve. It's not that big of a deal to know you have Sjogren's but if I'd gone on to have a kid, I might have got a shock, being anti-ro +ve and all

I think the point people are trying to make is that having a medical degree doesn't make you a good doctor. I don't think it should mean that their mistakes should be swept under the carpet because medicine is complex. I can understand their frustration because my life would have been a lot simpler. And I don't think coeliac's is so rare that it wouldn't be considered - especially with a family history I don't have a conscious memory prior to my diagnosis of a pain-free day, and that could easily have been avoided if my GP had just pulled the finger out and endoscopied me several years go.
Could you give me some personal advice over this sort of stuff, I know I can google it but prefer someones opinion.

3 years ago I was thin and though had self esteem issues I was happy, then I started piling on the pounds fast and got a huge amount of gut pain which I assumed was just a side effect of the weight gain, but the weight gain I didnt understand because at the time I was almost starving living off salad and mashed potato, and since then I cant eat anything fatty or I feel ill and want to faint etc. Every time I go to the doctor I am told it is just a bit of acid or inflamation and to take ibruprofen(the favourite thing of a doc these days)

Even these days when I eat I have to kinda force myself as one bite and I want to hurl.
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