Chemistry Salters F332 june 2010 Watch

robh-t
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#141
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#141
you guys need to chill out and just think logically. the course itself is reasonibly easy you just need to look at june 2009, and jan 2010 and look what the mark scheme wants for the different types of questions. The questions are likley to be exactly the same just phrased differently to last june as there isnt much content in this module that they can particuarly expand on. Also the person who keeps saying you need to know optical isomerism you are completley wrong. That is in unit 3 which you do next january!!

Sterioisomerism consists of :- E/Z isomerism and Optical Isomerism

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW IS E/Z ISOMERISM.

The simple answer to most of the questions asked on this is just to say that the reason certain isomers dont exhibit E/Z isomerism is because there is no free rotation around the carbon- carbon double bonds.


So guys just CHILL out this time tomorrow we can all come on here and talk through some answers. GOOD LUCK

feel free to ask me any questions on this particular module!
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hollywoodbudgie
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#142
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#142
(Original post by maoam2406)
for anyone struggling with reaction conditions...they can all be found in chapter 14.2 of the chemical ideas!
Lol I just discovered the storylines.
There seems to be good stuff for the prerelease on p85 to 86 :woo:
thanks btw!
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G.DMH
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#143
whats the bond angless inn CO2, H20, NH3 ? those are the ones most likelyy to comee upp
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hollywoodbudgie
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#144
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(Original post by robh-t)
you guys need to chill out and just think logically. the course itself is reasonibly easy you just need to look at june 2009, and jan 2010 and look what the mark scheme wants for the different types of questions. The questions are likley to be exactly the same just phrased differently to last june as there isnt much content in this module that they can particuarly expand on. Also the person who keeps saying you need to know optical isomerism you are completley wrong. That is in unit 3 which you do next january!!

Sterioisomerism consists of :- E/Z isomerism and Optical Isomerism

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW IS E/Z ISOMERISM.

The simple answer to most of the questions asked on this is just to say that the reason certain isomers dont exhibit E/Z isomerism is because there is no free rotation around the carbon- carbon double bonds.


So guys just CHILL out this time tomorrow we can all come on here and talk through some answers. GOOD LUCK

feel free to ask me any questions on this particular module!
Lol oh **** I kept looking at my notes and seeing the dots and wedges and so I
kept assuming that was optical isomerism.
Sorry people! At least if you learnt it, it's okay, it's easy stuff and er
<ducks from the attack of chemistry text books> :blush:

sorry!!!
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maoam2406
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#145
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#145
ahh me tooo i was flicking through the chem ideas n saw it! anything that helps me get a good grade lol! thnx for the storylines will hv a look!
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hollywoodbudgie
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#146
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#146
(Original post by G.DMH)
whats the bond angless inn CO2, H20, NH3 ? those are the ones most likelyy to comee upp
CO2 180
H20 104.5 (BUT you can write 107 again because salters doesn't expect you
to know about the lone pair stuff, so 107 is fine)
NH3 107
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hollywoodbudgie
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#147
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#147
You should be able to name at least 1 souce of each of these stuff as well:
CO2: Combustion of hyrdocarbons in fuels
CH4: Cattle farming
N2O: Fertilised soils
CO: Incomplete combusition of hydrocarbons
NOx: Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels from the reaction of N2 and O2
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hahahah
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#148
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#148
quick question.. how can u tell if a molecule has instantaneous dipole- induced dipole or permanent dipole- permanent dipole? because i'm a bit confused! please help.
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c4integrationisgay
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#149
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#149
ok i have a few concerns:

1. what on earth is nucleophilic substitution? can somebody give me an example of one of these reactions?
2. can somebody give me an example of a nucleophilic reaction too?
3. is any part of this explanation of why earth is getting warmer wrong?
- sun emits UV radiation and visible light to earth
- earth's surface warms, and so emits low frequency radiation and IR
- greenhouse gases absorb IR and bonds vibrate
- vibrations of greenhouse gases releases heat
- greenhouse gases also re-emit this IR in all directions (including earth)
- so earth gets warmer init..
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c4integrationisgay
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#150
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#150
(Original post by hahahah)
quick question.. how can u tell if a molecule has instantaneous dipole- induced dipole or permanent dipole- permanent dipole? because i'm a bit confused! please help.
good question..
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G.DMH
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#151
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#151
(Original post by hahahah)
quick question.. how can u tell if a molecule has instantaneous dipole- induced dipole or permanent dipole- permanent dipole? because i'm a bit confused! please help.

ID-ID remeberr are in alll moleculesss, thats the first thing.

So... for example a H-Cl molecule wwouldnt be ID-ID as, it containss a halogen. So rememberr, if Fluorine,Cholrne,Bromine are with a H, its going to be PD-PD as it contains a 'dipople'.

If its not that, then it might be hydrogen, but remeber thats only when you see OH.

So its like an elimination proccesss, does it have h bonding? no? then does it have a halogen, as they contain PD-PD? No arr... so it must be ID-ID

hope that kinddaa helpsss
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hollywoodbudgie
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#152
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#152
(Original post by c4integrationisgay)
ok i have a few concerns:

1. what on earth is nucleophilic substitution? can somebody give me an example of one of these reactions?
2. can somebody give me an example of a nucleophilic reaction too?
3. is any part of this explanation of why earth is getting warmer wrong?
- sun emits UV radiation and visible light to earth
- earth's surface warms, and so emits low frequency radiation and IR
- greenhouse gases absorb IR and bonds vibrate
- vibrations of greenhouse gases releases heat
- greenhouse gases also re-emit this IR in all directions (including earth)
- so earth gets warmer init..
nucleophilic subsitution: When a species with a partially negative charge/negatively charged ion seeks a positive charge and thus a functional group in a particular chemical compound is replaced by that of the nucleophile.

er crappy definition I know.

Example: OH attacking a halogenalkane.


read more about it here: http://www.chemguide.co.uk/mechanism...limvsubst.html

greenhouse gases absorb IR and bonds vibrate MORE.
You need to say more.

hope that helped
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hollywoodbudgie
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#153
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#153
(Original post by G.DMH)
ID-ID remeberr are in alll moleculesss, thats the first thing.

So... for example a H-Cl molecule wwouldnt be ID-ID as, it containss a halogen. So rememberr, if Fluorine,Cholrne,Bromine are with a H, its going to be PD-PD as it contains a 'dipople'.

If its not that, then it might be hydrogen, but remeber thats only when you see OH.

So its like an elimination proccesss, does it have h bonding? no? then does it have a halogen, as they contain PD-PD? No arr... so it must be ID-ID

hope that kinddaa helpsss
hyrogen bonding happens with
H-O
H-F
H-N

Permanent dipole permanent dipoles are hard to identify without an example. :puppyeyes:
If it's just a hydrocarbon chain than it's instantaneous.
blah I can't even spell anymore!
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G.DMH
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#154
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#154
(Original post by hollywoodbudgie)
hyrogen bonding happens with
H-O
H-F
H-N

Permanent dipole permanent dipoles are hard to identify without an example. :puppyeyes:
If it's just a hydrocarbon chain than it's instantaneous.
blah I can't even spell anymore!

lool..yhh dat soundd betterr
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Big.Juicy.Orange.
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#155
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#155
(Original post by cpdavis)
I've got a copy of the jan 10 F332, PM me your email and i'll send you a copy

hey would it be possible for you to send me a copy to please?
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hollywoodbudgie
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#156
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#156
Metalic Bonding
- Metals atoms are closely packed
-In most cases, the oiter electron shell of one metal atom overlaps with many others
- As a results, the electrons move freely from one to the other
<they're delocalised! :O>
- The postive metal ions are attracted to the delocalised negative electrons- They form a lattice of closely packed positive ions in a sea of delocalised electrons.



Hope that helps- I never quite understood it before! :blush:
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Jamesrb
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#157
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#157
(Original post by robh-t)
you guys need to chill out and just think logically. the course itself is reasonibly easy you just need to look at june 2009, and jan 2010 and look what the mark scheme wants for the different types of questions. The questions are likley to be exactly the same just phrased differently to last june as there isnt much content in this module that they can particuarly expand on. Also the person who keeps saying you need to know optical isomerism you are completley wrong. That is in unit 3 which you do next january!!

Sterioisomerism consists of :- E/Z isomerism and Optical Isomerism

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW IS E/Z ISOMERISM.

The simple answer to most of the questions asked on this is just to say that the reason certain isomers dont exhibit E/Z isomerism is because there is no free rotation around the carbon- carbon double bonds.


So guys just CHILL out this time tomorrow we can all come on here and talk through some answers. GOOD LUCK

feel free to ask me any questions on this particular module!
That's really helpful, thanks!

Has anybody got the June 2009 paper and mark scheme? I seem to have done June 2006, June 2007 and January 2007 so far...got January 2008 and January 2010 to go as well!

Thanks in advance
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Kooper
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#158
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#158
Just one question:

Is stereoisomerism the same as geometric isomerism?
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c4integrationisgay
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#159
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#159
(Original post by hollywoodbudgie)
nucleophilic subsitution: When a species with a partially negative charge/negatively charged ion seeks a positive charge and thus a functional group in a particular chemical compound is replaced by that of the nucleophile.

er crappy definition I know.

Example: OH attacking a halogenalkane.


read more about it here: http://www.chemguide.co.uk/mechanism...limvsubst.html

greenhouse gases absorb IR and bonds vibrate MORE.
You need to say more.

hope that helped
thanks again

just wanted to say i lost a mark in my mock for not saying 'they vibrate MORE'. i should really learn my lesson >_<
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Ohhai
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#160
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#160
(Original post by hollywoodbudgie)
:hugs: lol yay!!!
I'll be the girl with a giant blood covered sword sticking out of her back.


Oh wait. No I won't. :angelblush:
Lol!! Damn..I hope not..
Also, I'm going to Turkey this year for my holiday...antalya <3

................................ ................................ ..................

I got these questions from the website stated on the advance article www.astronomynotes.com

Review Questions

1.What distinguishes Venus from the rest of the planets? Why is Venus so hot?

2.What is a runaway greenhouse?

3. How does the ultraviolet-water interaction explain why Venus is so dry? How is the same process prevented on the Earth?

4. What major geological event occurred on Venus over half a billion years ago? How do we know?

If Mars' atmosphere is over 90% carbon dioxide like Venus', why does it have such a small greenhouse effect?

What atmospheric phenomenon can quickly wipe out any view of Mars' surface from above? What causes this phenomenon?

Why does Mars have such a thin atmosphere? What is the runaway refrigerator?

How does liquid water remove carbon dioxide gas from an atmosphere?
Why does Titan, a moon of Saturn less massive than Mars, have a more extensive atmosphere than Mars and Earth? (Recall the factors that affect atmosphere thickness.)

How do we know that liquid water once flowed on the surface of Mars?

If life exists on Mars today, where would it be found and why?

Where is water ice found today on Mars and how do we know? How deeply is it buried?

What distinguishes Earth from the rest of the planets? What is so unusual about its atmosphere and what produces this unusual feature?

What are the different ways that life removes carbon dioxide from the Earth's atmosphere?

Where do coal, oil, and natural gas come from? What happens when they are burned?

What is a natural (non-human) way that most of the carbon dioxide is returned to the atmosphere on Earth?

How does plate tectonics regulate the climate of the Earth?

What is the interaction of plate tectonics and liquid water?

What is a non-natural, human activity that returns a lot of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere?

How do we know that the increase in carbon dioxide is due to fossil fuel burning?

How much difference could just a few degrees change in the global average temperature make in our climate? How could that affect our civilization?

What have climate scientists found about the effect of humans on global climate?

How are climate models tested?

What are the benefits of the presence of the ozone layer?

Is the greenhouse problem on Earth different from the ozone problem? How so?
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