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Girls, do you use the title "Ms"? watch

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    (Original post by Robert Paulson)
    It's the correct meaning. Cry moar.
    Um, no, it's not. It was originally used in publishing and letter-writing where the writer did not know the marital status of the woman in question. In the 1970s, feminists began suggesting it's use more widely, but at no point was it used solely for divorced women.
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    I don't understand the CRB I just sign the forms for the scouts and we've lost leaders on it not coping with the Ms thing. They're burocrats running a system and I guess that if the system says Ms means you're divorced, then it must be so for the system to work...You can get around it you just have to put the same surname in the previous surnames box and give them dates when you allegedly ceased being Miss and Mrs but its a bit of a pallaver.
    As for the wedding ring thing - I'm a student nurse, have been a healthcare assistant for years and don't generally wear a ring because its not good for infection control and I don't want to lose expensive rings. And I guess I maybe act provocative 'cos I did get guys bugging before but I'm not deliberately that way...



    The last bit sounds weird, I'll have to check that out, cos I'm thinking of being a teacher someday.
    Surely guys would know you were taken from your wedding, ring, btw? Did you have much trouble with single guys bugging you when you were in a long term relationship but not married?
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    (Original post by riotgrrl)
    Um, no, it's not. It was originally used in publishing and letter-writing where the writer did not know the marital status of the woman in question. In the 1970s, feminists began suggesting it's use more widely, but at no point was it used solely for divorced women.
    Yes, but we aren't living in the 1970s...

    Formally, call it whatever you like. But by convention it is now known to mean a divorced female. I don't really give a toss what a bunch of naive young females on TSR think it means. You are far too inexperienced to form your own opinion. :yep:
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    (Original post by Robert Paulson)
    Yes, but we aren't living in the 1970s...

    Formally, call it whatever you like. But by convention it is now known to mean a divorced female. I don't really give a toss what a bunch of naive young females on TSR think it means. You are far too inexperienced to form your own opinion. :yep:
    I call troll.
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    I've used Ms since I was about 14, if guys can always use Mr then why should my title have to reflect marital status?
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    I know one girl who uses Ms and she is an awkward uber-feminist
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    I use Ms for myself (and it is not pronouced 'muzzzzz') :rolleyes:

    If I don't know about a woman's marital status (and it could be a pretty messy/complicated marital status), I always use Ms. It's politer in my point of view and avoids offence.
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    (Original post by generic hybrid)
    ms.

    the whole miss/mrs/ms thing while guys are fine with mr (or master, hahahah) is kinda dumb and pointless imo.
    I put down Lord. Mawah hahahaha!
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    (Original post by loxton1989)
    I find it funny that "ms" is the one word in the english language which, when pronounced, does not hold any vowels. I mean, "mIster" (Mr) Miss, Misses and Mz (Ms.).....

    Anyway, I really don't mind but I find it such a minor thing for feminists to demand ( in regards to previous posts) Master used to define a young unmarried man but it's fallen out of circulation nowadays... shame too
    Demand? what are we demanding? We're just making a decision about our own name, it isn't really something we have to demand.

    On another note, with the Master thing, it was never used to describe unmarried men, just young men/boys. It was to do with their age, not their marital status.
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    (Original post by Robert Paulson)
    Yes, but we aren't living in the 1970s...

    Formally, call it whatever you like. But by convention it is now known to mean a divorced female. I don't really give a toss what a bunch of naive young females on TSR think it means. You are far too inexperienced to form your own opinion. :yep:
    Except it doesn't.
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    I prefer Miss...Ms makes me feel old and unwanted for some reason :p:
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    I write letters at work and I always always put Ms on the envelope unless the woman in question has written in with her husband. It's definitely not on the presumption that they are divorced, but rather that I don't know their marital status and it's mostly none of my business.
 
 
 
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