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    (Original post by DynamicQ)
    The good writers touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies.

    Bradbury "Fahrenheit 451"
    This is very wise, but how do I use it to my advantage?
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    (Original post by Doke)
    [COLOR="Purple"]Ha ha, totally agree: I know I need to get published, my question was how?

    I write a bit of everything, I suppose. I kind of lean towards fantasy-horror type thing, but almost always adventure or some kind of journey. I do a lot of everything in that general area, really, I try not to stick to one genre because I'd get dull of repeated the same conventions and I like exploring different genres, seeing what's good to combine, where I can take different storylines, things like that, so saying just one or a couple I think wouldn't cover what I'm trying to do. Whether or not I'm doing it yet is another matter, but I know I'm trying.
    I kind of meant genre as in stories, novels, or poems. I write poetry and it's a bit easier to find markets, competitions and publishers for those than novels.

    Whereas most novelists start out as short story writers so conquer the short story market first (Yes, submit to The New Yorker/Paris Review :p:).

    If you like SF, there are plenty of online SF magazines that are well known. Assimov, Lightspeed for example.

    Check out this: http://www.fantasy-magazine.com/

    Online magazines are somewhat 'easier' to crack than trying to get a real publisher.

    Obviously, those magazines that I posted up there are still pretty good and attract thousands of submissions so you need to be confident in your own writing etc...




    I will answer your second quote later tonight. Need to revise chemistry stuff.
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    I genuinly think people are born to do certain things.
    You can 'learn' to hone your technique and stuff but I've always thought of writing as something that comes naturally to certain people.
    So just be confident in what you're doing
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    (Original post by spacepirate-James)
    I kind of meant genre as in stories, novels, or poems. I write poetry and it's a bit easier to find markets, competitions and publishers for those than novels.

    Whereas most novelists start out as short story writers so conquer the short story market first (Yes, submit to The New Yorker/Paris Review :p:).

    If you like SF, there are plenty of online SF magazines that are well known. Assimov, Lightspeed for example.

    Check out this: http://www.fantasy-magazine.com/

    Online magazines are somewhat 'easier' to crack than trying to get a real publisher.

    Obviously, those magazines that I posted up there are still pretty good and attract thousands of submissions so you need to be confident in your own writing etc...




    I will answer your second quote later tonight. Need to revise chemistry stuff.
    Okay, thanks loads, good luck with your chemistry

    Erm, sorry, in that case, mostly I prefer novels, but at the moment am trying to also write some short stories so that I might get better at being concise, because I'm not great at that, I like to give a lot of information because I like my reader to have the whole picture on the page that I do in my mind as well as a long and developed plot line. I've written a bit of poetry, but I am completely torn constantly as to how it good it is, so I know I need to work on it, just because I'm never wholly sure.

    I will check that out, thank you.

    I've had a look at some online magazine, but the most interesting one that I came across was in America and didn't accept anthing from outside of America, which was a total pain.

    Thank you. I will look into this.
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    (Original post by TheRealDarthVader)

    Here's what you need to do:
    - Gain a sense of unwarrented self-importance. You need this as a writer.
    I think she's already got it.......


    I have talked to my English teachers. One of them is very helpful because he's practically in the same boat that I am, still aspiring, so he can relate to me, but I want to be more successful than he is
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    (Original post by TheSmithsIndeed)
    I genuinly think people are born to do certain things.
    You can 'learn' to hone your technique and stuff but I've always thought of writing as something that comes naturally to certain people.
    So just be confident in what you're doing
    Thank you. I'm quite confident on my own because I've been trying to write for as long as I can remember.

    When it comes to giving my stuff away to other people to critique for me, I tend to waver in my confidence. It's more fear than doubt in my ability, but ah well. I understand that reactions to writing are entirely subjective, but ... I still get a little bit nervous when I know someone is going to be "honest". Ha ha

    Thanks.
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    Hello,

    May I make the suggestion that you join a website such as FictionPress? There you can write stories, as long or as short as you like, and post them up to the interweb for review by complete strangers. It's useful as it's a fairly easy way to hone in your writing skills and see what genres and styles you work best with.

    You could also join the sister website FanFiction too. The main advantages are that you don't have to worry too much on character development (allowing you to focus more on your literary style) and, depending on what your fic is based off of, you tend to get much more story traffic.

    Both websites are good though ^^
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    (Original post by FallenPetal)
    Hello,

    May I make the suggestion that you join a website such as FictionPress? There you can write stories, as long or as short as you like, and post them up to the interweb for review by complete strangers. It's useful as it's a fairly easy way to hone in your writing skills and see what genres and styles you work best with.

    You could also join the sister website FanFiction too. The main advantages are that you don't have to worry too much on character development (allowing you to focus more on your literary style) and, depending on what your fic is based off of, you tend to get much more story traffic.

    Both websites are good though ^^
    Cheers.

    I think a few people have suggested websites like that, but a lot of people have also pointed out that there could be an issue with people pinching ideas. I don't have a lot of experience with these websites, so I can only ask if you know if there's around this? I've browsed a few websites like that, but I don't know what kind of thing is expected from there or what kind of thing I can expect from it and there's always something holding me back. I mean, I always welcome feedback, but I feel like I'd rush into something if I knew I had it right there for me to put it whenever I felt it was done, even though I know I'm going to change my mind later. Could you maybe tell me a bit more about them?

    I've never really been into fan fiction, I know a few of my friends do, but I prefer writing my own thing. I kind of like character development.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Loonylottie)
    I think she's already got it.......


    I see. That is most unfortunate.
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    (Original post by Loonylottie)
    I think she's already got it.......
    Miaow...
    Only joking.
    I think it's good to have confidence in your writing, God, I wish I was as confident as the OP! I'm not even confident now I've got into UEA and I thought I would be! I constantly have to keep writing and whispering to myself that 'It's ok, you can only get better, you can't get worse.'
    That said, I know hope deep down I have *something*, it's just I'm not writing anything that shouldn't be used as recycling atm! I just don't like arrogance when people are like 'I'm the best writer ever and I will be better than X and Y.' That gets on my nerves. Luckily, I've only met lovely people!

    One thing people seem to forget when they're caught up in their dreams of being published is that being published doesn't always lead to acclaim and it rarely leads to million pound advanced deals. There are so many fantastic published books out there that aren't getting the write-ups in the Guardian Review, that aren't getting nominated for awards, that aren't niche but aren't getting read by main-stream audiences because they're being overshadowed by Dan Brown and The Twilight Saga and their ilk. God, I sound so old writing that! :laugh:
    I'm like a female version of Ebenezer Scrooge! Bah humbug! I think this is my cue to go to bed...
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    (Original post by Doke)
    Cheers.

    I think a few people have suggested websites like that, but a lot of people have also pointed out that there could be an issue with people pinching ideas. I don't have a lot of experience with these websites, so I can only ask if you know if there's around this? I've browsed a few websites like that, but I don't know what kind of thing is expected from there or what kind of thing I can expect from it and there's always something holding me back. I mean, I always welcome feedback, but I feel like I'd rush into something if I knew I had it right there for me to put it whenever I felt it was done, even though I know I'm going to change my mind later. Could you maybe tell me a bit more about them?

    I've never really been into fan fiction, I know a few of my friends do, but I prefer writing my own thing. I kind of like character development.

    Thanks
    The only thing I could suggest would be to not post anything you would want to potentially write up into a book one day, but bear in mind, most works of fiction are largely influenced by what someone else has written anyway, every story has an element of plagerism to it. I can't say what you should expect from it since it's different for everyone - some people just want to share their ideas with the world, whereas others want to use the website to improve. One thing you can do if you're not sure as to whether or not to take the leap is to just write a short story 1-2K in length and see how you feel. There's nothing wrong with writing something for one of these websites and never posting it, sometimes it can take a few attempts to make something which you're happy to put up on the web. Or maybe you will realise that small web based communities aren't the place for your creative ideas.

    I guess another advantage of fan fiction is it's much harder for someone to steal your work. And you can always write an alternate universe where the characters turn out differently, a prequel/sequel/spin off or insert your own character in the story if you want to practice CD too. But you do also need to have a subject which you're passionate about too, which is often the tricky part.

    The one big disadvantage of these websites is that people can be critical, but rarely as much as you need them to be. You can get a beta reader if you're lucky who will look over what you've written and point out any glaring flaws etc etc. or you can try and find someone like minded to you and write a collab project together, but that's all I can think of it terms of getting in depth peer review off of the web
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    (Original post by Doke)
    This is very wise, but how do I use it to my advantage?
    People like reallity, every day problems.
    Dostoevsky wrote about problems of parents and kids in his novel... and now he is recognised all over the world.
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    (Original post by FallenPetal)
    The only thing I could suggest would be to not post anything you would want to potentially write up into a book one day, but bear in mind, most works of fiction are largely influenced by what someone else has written anyway, every story has an element of plagerism to it.
    The difference between intertexuality and plagiarism is that, yes every story has an element of plagiarism but mostly it's subconscious. The worry that writers have is that someone would consciously steal their work from such a site.

    I guess another advantage of fan fiction is it's much harder for someone to steal your work. And you can always write an alternate universe where the characters turn out differently, a prequel/sequel/spin off or insert your own character in the story if you want to practice CD too. But you do also need to have a subject which you're passionate about too, which is often the tricky part.
    The problem with fan-fiction is that it's not really legal is it :p:

    (Original post by Doke)
    x
    Look, don't join FictionPress. Join a "proper" writing site. TeenageWriters is a perfect site. It's close-knit but gives honest feedback and is really good, if you're looking for a writing-environment.
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    (Original post by diamonddust)
    Miaow...
    Only joking.
    I think it's good to have confidence in your writing, God, I wish I was as confident as the OP! I'm not even confident now I've got into UEA and I thought I would be! I constantly have to keep writing and whispering to myself that 'It's ok, you can only get better, you can't get worse.'
    That said, I know hope deep down I have *something*, it's just I'm not writing anything that shouldn't be used as recycling atm! I just don't like arrogance when people are like 'I'm the best writer ever and I will be better than X and Y.' That gets on my nerves. Luckily, I've only met lovely people!
    Oh, hell, I hope I'm not like that. When I said I don't want to be like my teacher, I just meant that I hope I won't still be in the trying zone when I'm gone forty. I'm not as confident as I could be, I just don't want to show doubt in my ability at the same time as telling you all that I want it to take me somewhere. If that makes sense.

    (Original post by diamonddust)
    One thing people seem to forget when they're caught up in their dreams of being published is that being published doesn't always lead to acclaim and it rarely leads to million pound advanced deals. There are so many fantastic published books out there that aren't getting the write-ups in the Guardian Review, that aren't getting nominated for awards, that aren't niche but aren't getting read by main-stream audiences because they're being overshadowed by Dan Brown and The Twilight Saga and their ilk. God, I sound so old writing that! :laugh:
    I'm like a female version of Ebenezer Scrooge! Bah humbug! I think this is my cue to go to bed...
    I totally agree. You don't sound old, you speak such beautiful truth, I promise you. It's what I've been trying to tell people for AGES and they just don't listen. Well, most of them don't. Ah, well.

    I know it's not going to be easy, but I might as well try. There's no point wanting anything if you're not going to do anything about getting it.
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    (Original post by spacepirate-James)
    Look, don't join FictionPress. Join a "proper" writing site. TeenageWriters is a perfect site. It's close-knit but gives honest feedback and is really good, if you're looking for a writing-environment.
    I will
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Spacepirate-James)
    Look, don't join FictionPress. Join a "proper" writing site. TeenageWriters is a perfect site. It's close-knit but gives honest feedback and is really good, if you're looking for a writing-environment.
    (Original post by Doke)
    I will
    Thanks
    I've been a member of TW for over three years so I can definitely vouch for its awesomeness. There are also several members who have some publishing experience so could answer more of your questions and help you out with where you need to be to be ready to go for that.

    The site is currently having down-time though, but it should be back sometime this week.

    Other good site is http://critique.org/ which works as a serious critique exchange. These guys are great - they really know their stuff, and they'll critique your whole novel for you (you have to critique their's in return though), but it's well worth the work, and it's also free like TW.

    *****

    I've read this whole thread, multi-quoting as I go, and boom, multiquote fails . . . ah well. I'll go by what I remember, and ramble . . . sorry.

    Blogging-wise, I'd say go for it. A great many popular and successful authors have blogs, I stalk several myself, and they often offer valuable snippets of learning. It's true the internet is saturated with blogs, but that doesn't mean they aren't useful. They can help you practice writing for and audience, which, when novelling, the writing seems (for me anyway) less about an audience and more about me and my characters and the story. You might not get talent-spotted by it, but they have their uses, even if they're just a bit of fun. I have a blog, and though I get next to no views and my only subscribers are people I know, I enjoy doing it as it's something different from the usual novelling, poetry and facebook statuses.

    On Lulu and self-publishing. It's a no-go area for most serious writers. Vanity/self publishing isn't considered an achievement as what did you really do to get there? You simply bought a pretty printer, and glorifying that will only get you laughed at. Self-published books don't show you as a good writer, just someone who's determined or got a large ego, usually stroked by praise-ful friends and family. Agents are also less likely to take you seriously if you show them your self-published book as proof of your writing awesomeness, even if it is awesome.

    There have been some simply shocking piles of rubbish allowed into the market because of self-publishing (check out Patokafus on Amazon) because through that market, you can publish/print absolutely anything you like, and though your work might be gold dust, it won't matter because self publishing has this kind of smell about it that will only break your bank if you have some serious money to throw at marketing/advertisement. Traditional publishing, as hard as it is, WILL get you noticed, but like Spacepirate said, that's something that takes a lot of hard work.

    Competitions are definitely a good way to get noticed/references, as is submitting articles to magazines or newspapers, etc. Yeah, some cost money, but they're definitely cheaper than the amount you would have to pay to self-publish and print your novel/s, and in the long run, will probably give you a much better standing in front of an agent or traditional publisher.

    Aaaaaand I forgot the rest of what I was going to say. *sigh*

    Best of luck though.
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    (Original post by Lykaios~)
    I've been a member of TW for over three years so I can definitely vouch for its awesomeness. There are also several members who have some publishing experience so could answer more of your questions and help you out with where you need to be to be ready to go for that.

    The site is currently having down-time though, but it should be back sometime this week.

    Other good site is http://critique.org/ which works as a serious critique exchange. These guys are great - they really know their stuff, and they'll critique your whole novel for you (you have to critique their's in return though), but it's well worth the work, and it's also free like TW.

    *****

    I've read this whole thread, multi-quoting as I go, and boom, multiquote fails . . . ah well. I'll go by what I remember, and ramble . . . sorry.

    Blogging-wise, I'd say go for it. A great many popular and successful authors have blogs, I stalk several myself, and they often offer valuable snippets of learning. It's true the internet is saturated with blogs, but that doesn't mean they aren't useful. They can help you practice writing for and audience, which, when novelling, the writing seems (for me anyway) less about an audience and more about me and my characters and the story. You might not get talent-spotted by it, but they have their uses, even if they're just a bit of fun. I have a blog, and though I get next to no views and my only subscribers are people I know, I enjoy doing it as it's something different from the usual novelling, poetry and facebook statuses.

    On Lulu and self-publishing. It's a no-go area for most serious writers. Vanity/self publishing isn't considered an achievement as what did you really do to get there? You simply bought a pretty printer, and glorifying that will only get you laughed at. Self-published books don't show you as a good writer, just someone who's determined or got a large ego, usually stroked by praise-ful friends and family. Agents are also less likely to take you seriously if you show them your self-published book as proof of your writing awesomeness, even if it is awesome.

    There have been some simply shocking piles of rubbish allowed into the market because of self-publishing (check out Patokafus on Amazon) because through that market, you can publish/print absolutely anything you like, and though your work might be gold dust, it won't matter because self publishing has this kind of smell about it that will only break your bank if you have some serious money to throw at marketing/advertisement. Traditional publishing, as hard as it is, WILL get you noticed, but like Spacepirate said, that's something that takes a lot of hard work.

    Competitions are definitely a good way to get noticed/references, as is submitting articles to magazines or newspapers, etc. Yeah, some cost money, but they're definitely cheaper than the amount you would have to pay to self-publish and print your novel/s, and in the long run, will probably give you a much better standing in front of an agent or traditional publisher.

    Aaaaaand I forgot the rest of what I was going to say. *sigh*

    Best of luck though.
    This - is - awesome!! :bunny:

    Thanks, I haven't actually checked out that website yet because since I last checked this I've been swamped with coursework, but I was definitely planning to and now I will boost the priority of that plan. Ha ha. And I will look into the other one you recommended too. ^.^

    I will think about blogging, but it's never really appealed to me, mostly because I don't think that my life and my opinions are really interesting enough to write about in a public medium, even no one will read it. It's not like I don't practice writing when I can, it's just that I don't do it in very public ways. I never expected, if I were to blog, to be "found", but I was advised that having evidence of a blog would show people I'm serious about writing and would mean that they are more likely to look into anything I've written. But that remains to be seen, I suppose. I really don't know how valuable a blog is, having no experience with it. It's nice to get some information, though. :rolleyes:

    I definitely agree with you about Lulu; going on there was my dad's idea (a Christmas present, actually) and then he told everyone I know, so I don't really have a choice about whether or not I'm on there. I would much prefer to be published properly and professionally because that means that you know you're good enough to put around, so the hard work is worth it, even if you're not massively successful. Can't say that to my dad though. :dry:

    What I wanted was to see if there was anything I good do to get noticed in order to get traditionally published - if I got traditionally published, I would consider myself noticed. I mean, not massively successful if nothing happens after that, but right now that's the goal at whicj I am looking and to which I am nowhere near.

    I did appreciate Spacepirate's suggestion of competitions and I have been looking out for them and, in my brief perusals, I have come across one or two that might appeal to me to enter (because of the genre and tone of writing, not prizes and stuff), but, like I said earlier, I'm actually swamped with coursework and revision portfolios and other things that have a deadline. I mean, there will always be another competition around sooner or later, now is the only chance I have to do this work. So, obviously, that comes first, but I'm not forgetting to have a look around when I get some spare time, and when I take a break from working I like to write my own stuff because I fin it relaxing. So when I get round to actually entering one, I won't be out of practice.

    Thanks, loads.
    I'd appreciate anything else you think of that might be helpful.
    Sorry about the essay, but you started it (and I loved yours, by the way. Ha ha).
    Cheers,
    D x
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    Write as much as you can. Submit short stories to magazines as often as possible. Enter writing competitions. Get an agent - You will NEED an agent as publishers tend not to accept manuscripts without one. Also get used to being criticised, this happens a lot!!


    My friend has his first novel published and has two short stories published now also
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    (Original post by Doke)
    My main aspiration in life is to be a professional writer, hopefully at a good enough level that I might earn a decent income from my efforts. As far as education and personal involvement goes, I believe that I am heading in the right direction and, hopefully, am not doing anything to detract from my goals. I am taking subjects that I have been informed are relevant (aside from the obvious English Language and Literature, I am also studying Media Studies and Philosophy and Ethics) and I am applying in 2011 to study Creative Writing at a number of universities that, after much research, I have determined to have courses suited to my tastes in the area. I write a lot in my free time to hone my skills so that if the time comes that I might offer my work professionally, I will have developed my talent to an appropriate level. I mostly write fiction and have made considerable advances over the past decade in my abilities in terms of style and detail. I hope that I will be able to one day earn a living from this as it is something that I love and do so very much.

    However, I am aware to the point of crippling fear that the entertainment industry is very competitive and, if anyone can help me, I would like to have some idea of more ways in which I can be noticed as a writer. I know fully that writing alone when all of my work stays on my memory stick where no one will see it will never be particularly fruitful, no matter how much I practice or how good (or otherwise ) my work might be.

    I have been advised that I should write a blog, and I am in the process of looking into this option, but the vast number of blogging sites available make it hugely confusing. I want to stand out and not just be another random blogger with no readers.

    Realistically, what can I do to make me stand out more? Is there anything I can do to catch the attention of people who can really make a difference for me in this regard?

    Thank you in advance for any help you have to offer, as well as apologies for my long-winded request. I just like to make sure I've covered everything that I do not cause confusion.

    Doke x

    P.S., I am aware that this thread is also in another part of the website, but I accidentally posted it in the wrong area and will not try to make any excuses for my mistake.
    Tumblr :love:
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    (Original post by Doke)
    My main aspiration in life is to be a professional writer, hopefully at a good enough level that I might earn a decent income from my efforts. As far as education and personal involvement goes, I believe that I am heading in the right direction and, hopefully, am not doing anything to detract from my goals. I am taking subjects that I have been informed are relevant (aside from the obvious English Language and Literature, I am also studying Media Studies and Philosophy and Ethics) and I am applying in 2011 to study Creative Writing at a number of universities that, after much research, I have determined to have courses suited to my tastes in the area. I write a lot in my free time to hone my skills so that if the time comes that I might offer my work professionally, I will have developed my talent to an appropriate level. I mostly write fiction and have made considerable advances over the past decade in my abilities in terms of style and detail. I hope that I will be able to one day earn a living from this as it is something that I love and do so very much.

    However, I am aware to the point of crippling fear that the entertainment industry is very competitive and, if anyone can help me, I would like to have some idea of more ways in which I can be noticed as a writer. I know fully that writing alone when all of my work stays on my memory stick where no one will see it will never be particularly fruitful, no matter how much I practice or how good (or otherwise ) my work might be.

    I have been advised that I should write a blog, and I am in the process of looking into this option, but the vast number of blogging sites available make it hugely confusing. I want to stand out and not just be another random blogger with no readers.

    Realistically, what can I do to make me stand out more? Is there anything I can do to catch the attention of people who can really make a difference for me in this regard?

    Thank you in advance for any help you have to offer, as well as apologies for my long-winded request. I just like to make sure I've covered everything that I do not cause confusion.

    Doke x

    P.S., I am aware that this thread is also in another part of the website, but I accidentally posted it in the wrong area and will not try to make any excuses for my mistake.
    find a brilliant agent!
    write a story with great plot and a shocking ending
    create a new genre?
    originality always wins
    catchy title
    create characters that have 3d personalities
    have deep moral understanding
    and make sure it keeps the reader reading until they finished the book or killed
    Tumblr is actually the best blog for writers such as yourself my tumblr account is in my sig
 
 
 
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