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What is you're view on the celebrations of Margaret thatcher's death? watch

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    (Original post by conorm11)
    Oops, simple case of mistaken identity. I honestly thought you were a guy who i had an argument with on a different thread. SORRY!
    LOL! No problem
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    In all their passion of political views they are forgetting about life, morals, decency..... she was a person. To bring politics into her death is disrespectful.
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    (Original post by marcusfox)
    Again with "It wasn't Communism" :rolleyes:

    Communism is all well and good in theory, but in practice it's nothing but an extreme form of capitalism without even the most basic freedoms, rights and liberties.

    Communism is only ever praised by those at the top of the gravy train, and by those who have never experienced *true* Communism - the reality, not that found in their copy of the Ladybird book of Communism.

    It suits certain people because like religion, it tells you what to think so you don't have to.
    Doesn't capitalism tell you what to think as well?
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    *your

    My view is that the people who celebrate her death are everything wrong with this country- a bunch of plebs looking for any excuse to whine about their poverty, whilst continuing to plunge the country into further debt by sustaining their sordid livestyles through welfare. Also, how on earth could it be considered socially acceptable to celebrate someone's death...? It speaks volumes about the chavvy culture, or lack thereof.
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    Whether you agree with what thatcher did, whether you didn't, whether you hated her guts, whatever, celebrating someone's death is vile and is all that it wrong with this nation.

    I'm from the north, and please don't think that the whole of the north is celebrating her death. We're not, but those that are are the twisted union members who think they got a hard bargain because someone stood upto them. Scargill and his men were bringing this country to a standstill and there are a lot up here that resent that. Apart from the union men, you've got the bandwagonists, rent a crowd and also their families who know no different. What a horrid bunch making excuses for their poverty, for example how they can complain they can't afford heating etc, yet can support a 30 a day habit. Yeah, ok.

    Scumbags, the lot of them.
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    (Original post by AspiringMedic8)
    I think the celebrations are distasteful, but by in large they involve posh, stuck-up, middle class socialists who are seeking attention and looking to be controversial.

    My parents are both working class and on low wages (lorry driver and postal worker), and my granddad actually worked in Ravenscraig Steelworks and they all thought Margaret Thatcher was a good Prime Minister. Indeed, she was elected three times, so it's not like she was imposing her views upon people, rather the people of Britain wanted her as a Prime Minister and liked her policies. People seem to treat her as a dictator nowadays, when that simply wasn't the case.

    One policy of Thatcher's which I have personally benefited from is 'The Right to Buy.' It infuriates me when I have an anti-Thatcher teacher, an MP or a wealthy student tell me this policy was bad for the working class. It wasn't at all! I've lived in bought council houses my whole life and it's the only thing that my lone parent family has been able to afford. If Thatcher hadn't introduced that legislation, where would I be? Would I be in a private home? No, my Dad can't afford that. Would I be in a rough council estate near a poor school? Yes, most likely. Would I be relying on the state? Yes! Definitely!

    I don't know if it's a bit selfish of me to like this policy simply because it has benefited my family, but now I have my own bedroom and live in a nice part of town and near a great school, which I love. Margaret Thatcher has allowed me to aspire to becoming a Doctor by allowing my Dad to give me a basic, albeit very comfortable home near a very successful school and just enough money to go out with my friends and get nice clothes. Without her, I don't know where my family would be -that's why it annoys me when people with no association to council houses think they have the right to be against people being able to buy affordable homes!

    I liked her attitude of encouraging people to be less reliant on the state and aspiring to make money and be successful. I'm not a greedy person, but I would like to earn a good living when I'm older, and I know this sounds cheesy, but I want to give my Mum and Dad all the things they can't afford currently, because right now they spend the money on me instead



    Oh yes, thumb me down because I'm from the working class, and we should be kept at bay in our sink schools and abhorrent council estates.
    The thing is, if the 'Right to Buy' policy hadn't been introduced, council estates wouldn't be like they are now. All of the good council houses, like your's no doubt, were bought up for a very low price, leaving only the worse ones for the most vulnerable. You'd probably be living in a similar house that you do now because they would still be there for social housing tenants to rent. To make it even worse, the money that the council received from the sale of housing wasn't allowed to be used to rebuild the housing stock. This has resulted in a severe lack of social housing now so that councils are spending more money supporting people in the private sector with housing benefit. Before the policy, there was plenty of good quality social housing that wasn't just reserved for the poorest but provided a wide range of people with their housing needs.
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    I think on one hand it's distasteful. I also question why those born in the nineties are jumping on the bandwagon. At the end of the day, I haven't heard of this happening before when a minister has died. She was an efficient and heartless woman. She ruined the lives of many, those people deserve to celebrate.
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    The way I see it is anything she did happened 30 years ago. Yes she did ruin alot of peoples lives, however she did great things for our economy. Therefore she is a significant figure in our history and anybody's death should be respected.
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    I am aware that Thatcher divided opinions (understatement) in her time, but we cannot forget that she made difficult decisions that in any circumstance could not have pleased everyone. No one can pass extreme judgements without upsetting someone.

    Yes, an event of this scale of this one is asking for trouble, but she was, after all, the first and so far only female prime minister this country has had, made her way from a relatively working class background to Oxford and to the position of leading the UK, and this acheivement does deserve recognition.

    At least she stood for what she thought was right and did not stand down like a certain politician did (one Nick Clegg) after promising the things he did.

    At least she had a backbone.
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    I am aware that Thatcher divided opinions (understatement) in her time, but we cannot forget that she made difficult decisions that in any circumstance could not have pleased everyone. No one can pass extreme judgements without upsetting someone.

    Yes, an event of this scale of this one is asking for trouble, but she was, after all, the first and so far only female prime minister this country has had, made her way from a relatively working class background to Oxford and to the position of leading the UK, and this acheivement does deserve recognition.

    At least she stood for what she thought was right and did not stand down like a certain politician did (one Nick Clegg) after promising the things he did.

    At least she had a backbone, and quite frankly, to celebrate someone's death is disrespectful. At the end of the day, no one has the right to prevent someone passing on with dignity.
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    I think personally,if you don't like her,than respect her. No-one should celebrate over her death,let alone anyone's death,but in some religions,they celebrate death,because they are going in a peaceful state.
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    The effect of what she did is still felt in Scotland today... and I can speak for that.
    Personally I think protesting over what she did is maybe better than "celebrating..."
    But I don't think anything she did was positive for the Northern half of Britain in any way.

    I do, however, think she deserves respect for the fact she was the first female Prime Minister.
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    The protests were a bit of a damp squib weren't they?

    About 300 in total, utterly drowned out by supporters. After years and years of boasts being made about the careful plans being hatched for Thatcher's send off and the utter chaos that would accompany it, 300 was the most that the protestsers could muster. What was it - bath and hairwash night?
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    Rot in Hell ye auld hag.
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    Time will tell is the only comment i can post. Coz nobody can survive the test of history at all times.


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    In my opinion I believe that nobody's death should be celebrated, whatever she did wrong,I think that her family deserve respect as it was an unfortunate death and they're still grieving. I'm 12 and have absolutely no idea what she did wrong? I guess I wasn't around when she made her mistakes?


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