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I have Asperger's watch

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    (Original post by OU Student)
    The only difference between high functioning Autism and Aspergers is the speech delay, which doesn't always mean it's mild. And mild implies you have virtually no problems.
    I'm just working off my psychology classes here. I know that Asperger's people have a lot of problems, I'm just saying most cases of Asperger's are considered to be mild to moderate autism. Some are severe. Obviously, 'mild autism' is a deceptive term - it carries with it a lot of issues that can really disrupt life.
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    Some people say I have autism (mostly people who have autism themselves). Don't know why as I have no problem functioning in society, getting jobs, living, etc. Just because I'm a bit shy and don't tend to look shopkeepers in the eyes that much! Maybe they are just trying to recruit more members. Some people like saying they are are "highly functioning autstics" or "aspies" as it makes them feel special and not just "a bit of a geek". I was told by one that he was the "next step in evolution" like he thought he was one of those mutants from the X-men!

    I think to be properly autistic you have to have not been able to speak until the age of four or something. But even then you can grow out of it.
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    (Original post by noobynoo)

    I think to be properly autistic you have to have not been able to speak until the age of four or something. But even then you can grow out of it.
    You are mistaken. Many people on the spectrum hit their milestones (such as speaking) when "neurotypicals" did. Autism doesn't = developmental delay.

    You can't grow out of Autism. If you can, you didn't have it in the first place.
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    (Original post by noobynoo)
    Some people say I have autism (mostly people who have autism themselves). Don't know why as I have no problem functioning in society, getting jobs, living, etc. Just because I'm a bit shy and don't tend to look shopkeepers in the eyes that much! Maybe they are just trying to recruit more members. Some people like saying they are are "highly functioning autstics" or "aspies" as it makes them feel special and not just "a bit of a geek". I was told by one that he was the "next step in evolution" like he thought he was one of those mutants from the X-men!

    I think to be properly autistic you have to have not been able to speak until the age of four or something. But even then you can grow out of it.
    Being shy is not a diagnostic feature of Asperger's. I am not quiet or lacking in confidence in seminars or in formal settings (doctor's office or in a store). That is because I know what to say (also true when I am talking to people I know very well). It's very straightforward and not very demanding. But when it comes to unstructured socially settings, it's a nightmare (and when talking about esoteric issues - feelings, etc). I don't get the urge that many people get to make small talk and I don't know what to say or when to say it. Which is why I'd be mostly quiet in such situations. But I am not shy, I just don't know what to say.

    There are many reasons why someone might be shy - more often than not, there's nothing clinically wrong with the person. I don't know why it is considered by many a symptom of a syndrome or a disorder. In the case of people with Asperger's, being shy (or rather, quiet) is possibly the result of being a social failure for years. But it's quite irrelevant in itself.

    Also, I think Asperger's will probably cease to be a separate diagnosis from autism.

    EDIT: Oh I forgot to say, I was diagnosed with Asperger's.
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    (Original post by tomtjl)
    Ohh. Sorry, I wasn't trying to be mean or anything .

    Personally, I'm not scared of big crowds. I can speak confidently in front of people and have done many times, however when I am in a small crowd (ie I'm with 10-20 friends) I do not know what to say and when it is my turn to speak, etc.
    I'm exactly like this. I do also feel a little uncomfortable round large crowds, but only in a social sense - busy campus or a London for example don't bother me.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    You are mistaken. Many people on the spectrum hit their milestones (such as speaking) when "neurotypicals" did. Autism doesn't = developmental delay.

    You can't grow out of Autism. If you can, you didn't have it in the first place.
    I think you can grow to deal with some of the ways your AS affects you - like I know that I don't like biiig groups of people, so I control that by socialising with my friends at home or in the pub rather than out at bars and clubs. So I guess what I'm saying is that as you get older and you have more control over your life, you can minimise how much you have to encounter the things you don't like.
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    (Original post by Cornelius)
    Being shy is not a diagnostic feature of Asperger's. I am not quiet or lacking in confidence in seminars or in formal settings (doctor's office or in a store). That is because I know what to say (also true when I am talking to people I know very well). It's very straightforward and not very demanding. But when it comes to unstructured socially settings, it's a nightmare (and when talking about esoteric issues - feelings, etc). I don't get the urge that many people get to make small talk and I don't know what to say or when to say it. Which is why I'd be mostly quiet in such situations. But I am not shy, I just don't know what to say.

    There are many reasons why someone might be shy - more often than not, there's nothing clinically wrong with the person. I don't know why it is considered by many a symptom of a syndrome or a disorder. In the case of people with Asperger's, being shy (or rather, quiet) is possibly the result of being a social failure for years. But it's quite irrelevant in itself.

    Also, I think Asperger's will probably cease to be a separate diagnosis from autism.

    EDIT: Oh I forgot to say, I was diagnosed with Asperger's.
    YES that is the best description of my 'shyness' that I've ever heard.
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    (Original post by Bassetts)
    Do more men have autism (any stats?) and why do you think people think men are more likely to have autism?
    Some are also suggesting, that this comes from the fact, that Mr. Asperger only described boys and thus behaviour typical for girls with Asperger is not listed and thus falsely diagnosed. Just enter girl & asperger into google, I am too lazy to search the links.

    I think the term mild autism does not mean, mild in terms of "no problems", but mild compared to those Autists, who will never speak, in extreme cases, totally unable to communicate in any more advanced way with the world around them (e.g. just hitting their head against walls). Anyway, I don't think it makes sense to regard Aspergers as stand-alone condition, as Autism is anyway an umbrella term and you would allways specify, like e.g. Kanner-Autism.
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    you can learn to cope with the conditions and deal with them so they don't really affect you anymore
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    (Original post by paradoxicalme)
    Well, autism is on a spectrum. I'd guess most would-be-Asperger's diagnoses would be towards the milder end of that spectrum.
    'Mild', 'moderate', and 'severe' are unhelpful as categorisations. I worked in a college for people with intellectual disabilities, where many of the students had a combination of Down Syndrome, autism, and other difficulties. Some of these students were more independent than I am, and I am of above-average intellectual ability and have fluent speech. The categorisations can also be used to harm people who need help. One of my best friends is what most people would consider to be severely autistic - she can't speak and has numerous very obvious difficulties - but because she is capable of studying at university level (although she has to do it via distance learning since she can't look after herself), she doesn't qualify for independent living support where she lives. She wants to move away from her family and she can't unless she's funded for support. Additionally, sometimes people hear the words 'severely autistic' and dismiss the person outright, giving no thought for his or her abilities. The revisions to the DSM are meant to take this into account: each person is diagnosed simply with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, and then the clinician specifies their areas of difficulty and the level of difficulty with each thing. It has the potential to be quite helpful.
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    (Original post by opalescent)
    'Mild', 'moderate', and 'severe' are unhelpful as categorisations.
    Agreed. By classing someone as "severe", you're ignoring their talents and by classing someone as "mild", you're ignoring their difficulties.
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    (Original post by opalescent)
    The revisions to the DSM are meant to take this into account: each person is diagnosed simply with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, and then the clinician specifies their areas of difficulty and the level of difficulty with each thing. It has the potential to be quite helpful.
    Very interesting way to see it, but it makes sense.
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    Where I am, they only diagnose ASD, which is pretty useless.
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    how many people on here actually have Asperger's
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    (Original post by Mrx123)
    how many people on here actually have Asperger's
    I don't know yet because I need to get tested by a doctor.
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    (Original post by Mrx123)
    how many people on here actually have Asperger's
    I imagine its difficult to know the actual figure. Won't be that surprised if there are quite a few on here who are undisgnosed.
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    (Original post by Mrx123)
    I get shy around people, don't like group work and always live in fear that people don't like me

    I just don't know how to feel letting people know
    Dude I strongly advise you keep it to yourself. I was told to tell people by my adviser when I started university and it was a complete disaster. Telling people just caused them to distance themselves from me leading to me being ignored in my hall by the end of the term. Also if you aren't clued up it really does look like an excuse for being an *******. Not saying it is because it obviously isn't but that's how a lot of people saw it. I would **** up socially, say "sorry I have aspergers" and they just got madder. As for telling people that I knew for a long time that didn't work out so well either. They will start to see you in a different way and sometimes even unintentionally patronize and look down on you. However the number one reason why I stopped telling people is because I just don't want to be associated with the asperger's community because they are never in the news for anything good. Whenever there's some news story about a school shooter or a peeping tom and information surfaces that he had aspergers syndrome I just cringe inside thinking that people are now associating me with these sorts of people. Even the one and only good stories about people with aspergers the "boy genius" stories are full of cringeworthy autism because it's basically the kid being a stereotypical dorky nerd x1000.

    There will be many retorts about how they told their friends and they were totally supportive but it's like coming out as gay; 99% of people will lose some friends and be treated differently by even the ones who stay. Is it worth it or should you just keep quiet and pretend to be normal? It's all up to you.
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    (Original post by RibenaRockstar)
    I have fairly mild Asperger's but no diagnosis - I'm 19 and only heard of it for the first time when I was about 15-16. For the first couple of years I knew about it, it sounded fairly 'like me' but I didn't want to self-diagnose, etc etc, or use it as a crutch. Then about a year and a half ago I did a bit more reading about it and it just explains how I relate to the world so well. Understanding it has helped me to understand myself and has helped me to respond to the world better - rather than seeing parts of myself as failures, I see those aspects of myself as just how I am and how I respond to the world. I've never been happier.

    I feel like I could get a diagnosis but it wouldn't help much. A couple of friends that I've told have said that they were already thinking it, both of whom already had close friends with diagnoses.

    Edit: why the neg?
    Self diagnosed autists; is there anyone more irritating?
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    (Original post by Bassetts)
    I don't know yet because I need to get tested by a doctor.
    I swear you just want to have Aspergers. Although, why you'd want it, is a mystery.
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    well that was expected

    Your Aspie score: 143 of 200

    Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 60 of 200
    You are very likely an Aspie

 
 
 
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