AQA GCSE Chemistry - C2 and C3 15th May Watch

ArabianElle_
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#141
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does anyone ideas of potential six marks ?
is there always one six mark in chem' additional btw ??
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John10000
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#142
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Not much tbh, just know how to work them out

1 mole of a substance is the relative formula mass of the substance in grams
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ryanroks1
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(Original post by ArabianElle_)
does anyone ideas of potential six marks ?
is there always one six mark in chem' additional btw ??
There could be 2 potentially, as this was the case in the B2 exam.
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erzrocks
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#144
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can you please give me some c2 questions
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mickel_w
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#145
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(Original post by erzrocks)
can you please give me some c2 questions btw how come most people are doing c2 and c3 im only doing c2??
coz u is retard
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Excuse Me!
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#146
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#146
Can someone write out for me the method for insoluble salts?
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Excuse Me!
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#147
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How is relative atomic mass linked to isotopes?
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ryanroks1
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#148
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#148
Information on insoluble salts: http://prntscr.com/3j8j7z
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harveenkaur
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#149
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I do not get the Haber process at all, someone explain please?
Also, for C2, I dont get the electrolysis of brine!!
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Sayless
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(Original post by lostinn3verland)
go over some calculation questions bc they're definitley going to be on, especially moles and reacting mass calculations, im so scared about the exam but i hope everyone does well! Good Luck
just went over them, thanks a lot for the advice and good luck to you too!
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ryanroks1
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#151
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(Original post by harveenkaur)
I do not get the Haber process at all, someone explain please?
Also, for C2, I dont get the electrolysis of brine!!
Brine is sodium chloride. There are 4 different elements involved.

Na+
Cl-
H+
OH-

At the positive electrode, chlorine loses an electron and joins with another chlorine to form Cl2 - chlorine gas.

At the negative electrode, hydrogen gains an electron and similarly forms hydrogen gas.

This leaves sodium hydroxide behind. This is a very useful substance and it can be used to make soap and bleach etc.
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harveenkaur
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(Original post by ryanroks1)
Brine is sodium chloride. There are 4 different elements involved.

Na+
Cl-
H+
OH-

At the positive electrode, chlorine loses an electron and joins with another chlorine to form Cl2 - chlorine gas.

At the negative electrode, hydrogen gains an electron and similarly forms hydrogen gas.

This leaves sodium hydroxide behind. This is a very useful substance and it can be used to make soap and bleach etc.


OHHHH this makes so much more sense, thank you so much!!

Any help on the haber process & the conditions?
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Manexopi
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#153
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Haber process- making ammonia from nitrogen (air) and hydrogen (natural gas)
The forwards direction is exoteric so in order to increase the yield, we need to decrease the temperature and increase the pressure( pressure leans towards the direction of the equation with less moles)
However we use a temperature of 450 as a compromise. This is because if it was too low, the particles would not have enough kinetic energy so there would be a decrease in the frequency of collision and the success of said collisions.
Using a high pressure is dangerous as it may explode and is expensive so we use a pressure of 200 atmospheres
An iron catalyst is used to lower the activation energy
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Excuse Me!
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#154
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(Original post by ryanroks1)
Brine is sodium chloride. There are 4 different elements involved.

Na+
Cl-
H+
OH-

At the positive electrode, chlorine loses an electron and joins with another chlorine to form Cl2 - chlorine gas.

At the negative electrode, hydrogen gains an electron and similarly forms hydrogen gas.

This leaves sodium hydroxide behind. This is a very useful substance and it can be used to make soap and bleach etc.
Might help to mention that the reason Cl2 and H2 go to the electrodes is because they're less reactive so it's easier to get rid of them.
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JohnRutts
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#155
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(Original post by georgecarsley)
if insoluble salts comes up as the 6mark question i am screwed
Take a look at the 6 marker on the june 2012 paper-that was about salts. The mark scheme might give you some idea on what to write
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notevensoph
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#156
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#156
Think theres a good chance of nanoparticles to come up- carbon nanotubes used for tennis rackets and so on
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harveenkaur
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#157
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#157
Can someone please explain titration calculations & calorimetry?
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DanE98
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#158
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(Original post by 2014_GCSE)
6 Mark Guesses:

C2: Electrolysis, Insoluble Salts, Rates of Reaction
C3: Titration Equations, Haber Process, Hard and Soft Water

GET REVISING GUYS! Still plenty of time for learning entire methods and cramming in facts!
Insoluble salts came up recently, I think
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EgV98
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#159
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Omg I'm so glad I'm not the only one, I'm predicted A* but C2 mock I got a B, I know the content but the style of questions throw me D: good luck
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vish.handa
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(Original post by Student 977)
Why do you need two substances for testing halides and sulphates?
EDIT :
see post below me for reason why


Not entirely sure but I believe they work as a catalyst

EDIT :
see post below me for reason why
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