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Should teachers be banned from striking? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should teachers be banned from striking?
    Yes
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    28.02%
    No
    167
    71.98%

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    (Original post by n00)
    Congratulations, thats really very impressive for someone that struggles with reading comprehension and making a cohesive argument. I didn't know you were a nurse.
    Nurses aren't the only ones striking today.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Nurses aren't the only ones striking today.
    Nurses aren't striking. I thought that was your point.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Out of interest, are your views just your personal ones, or does this post represent the 'TSR view'? If the latter, it certainly explains a lot, as I've repeatedly detected a right wing bias to TSR.

    It's utter nonsense that workers can advance their cause significantly via social media. The reality is that only one weapon belonging to working people really counts - their right to withdraw their labour.

    It's ironic that during the partial and slow recovery from a huge strike of capitalists, the one thing Tories keep banging on is denying working people the right to strike. This is one important reason why our rights need to be protected by the EU from the narrow, sectarian government we have, which is only interested in the wealthy.
    I'm a Labour Party member and agree but, while I agree with you about the recovery, I just don't think strikes are popular in the UK.

    I was making the social media point because I believe people have and can use to demonstrate and affect the power and decision-making of the political establishment effectively: London riots on the demonstration front, Hillsborough on the justice front - being two recent examples.

    The Student Room is only biased towards students.
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    They are does it matter what we think? Too many opinions nowadays!
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    (Original post by n00)
    Nurses aren't striking. I thought that was your point.
    Ah no, so they aren't, looking at the list.

    I just used nurses as their payscale is more easily to hand.

    My point is the public sector wage rise cap isn't really a cap if you have contractual pay progression. is typically the minimum wage rise that is being seen. The average teacher/nurse/bobby ect is getting more.
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    tHE REASON THEY ARE STRIKING BECAUSE OF THERE PENSIONS AND THEY HAVE TO WORK UNTIL THEY ARE 64 AND THEY HAVE THE RIGHT TO STRIKE IT NOT A DICTATORSHIP
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    (Original post by Stealth 44)
    tHE REASON THEY ARE STRIKING BECAUSE OF THERE PENSIONS AND THEY HAVE TO WORK UNTIL THEY ARE 64 AND THEY HAVE THE RIGHT TO STRIKE IT NOT A DICTATORSHIP
    Surely, since for many years the normal retirement age for a teacher for pension purposes has been 65, retiring at 64 would be 'better'?
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    I've said it before and I'll say it again: douchebag filter.

    We should have a douchebag filter before anyone's allowed to enter a profession where they care for people/other people's education depends on them.

    That way, they wouldn't strike.

    How would it work? Get likable people who are good judges of character to interview prospective teachers and doctors before they embark on their training and weed out the ****ers. Interview their parents and flatmates etc.

    Scarred for life by some of my more douchey teachers/doctors, and they're exactly the ones who would strike.
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    From what I've read, most of you dont understand how a strike works or why they happen, the more of your comments I read the more IQ I lose -.-


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
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    (Original post by All-rounder)
    From what I've read, most of you dont understand how a strike works or why they happen, the more of your comments I read the more IQ I lose -.-


    This was posted from The Student Room's iPhone/iPad App
    Care to explain?

    I crossed a picket line this morning and still don't know what that means.

    And I really don't know whay its happening. Not like they're going to get a 5% pay deal.
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    (Original post by Stealth 44)
    tHE REASON THEY ARE STRIKING BECAUSE OF THERE PENSIONS AND THEY HAVE TO WORK UNTIL THEY ARE 64 AND THEY HAVE THE RIGHT TO STRIKE IT NOT A DICTATORSHIP
    Totally agree the right to strike by EVERYONE in the workplace is a fundamental right that separates us from a dictatorship. The power of the unions is after all inherited from the workers it represents.
    Bosses and employers have a union too - why do they feel the need for one- its the CBi; the top government civil servants have one also - why- its called the FDA.
    Employers are walking all over their staff these days and without that protection in the workplace (which many lack) you might as well go live in North Korea!:chaplin:
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    (Original post by emsa86)
    No I don't think that teachers should strike. My son has got tomorrow off school even though his school is open as his teacher is one of only two in the school that has decided to strike. As a parent it's frustrating knowing that my son is one of the very few in the school who can not attend tomorrow, as school's cannot use supply teachers to cover industrial action. It's even more annoying as this comes just over a week before his teacher has a six weeks paid holiday at the tax payer's expense.
    It's hardly a holiday, there is A LOT of paperwork and planning to do during the holidays. Even then, some people's jobs stop once they go home, but teachers take their work home with them as paperwork takes up about 80% of a teachers work load. So all those nights spent planning differentiating lesson plans for pupils, including your sons, are given back during the six weeks holiday. And without teachers striking in the past and taking a stand, your son's educational experience could be incredibly different, in a bad way.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Out of interest, are your views just your personal ones, or does this post represent the 'TSR view'? If the latter, it certainly explains a lot, as I've repeatedly detected a right wing bias to TSR.
    .
    I believe I've sensed an anti right bias from him before but there's nothing really socialist from him. I'd guess he's a social democrat/center-left.
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    (Original post by Heinz59)
    NQT salary is to reflect that you are still learning! NQTs have more work to do in lesson preparation during the early stages of their career. Please mention the massive increases in pay you will get each year as you move up the Pay Scales. In 5 or so years from now you could be earning double.
    I suggest you join the NASWUT who are NOT on strike and have seen the good sense to negotiate there demands rather than use bully boy tactics against children and parents.

    Most people in my area of the country probably earn 1/2 what an NQT does if they even have a job at all. Who gets the benefit of the increased pension contributions? They have got one of the best pensions of any industry. There is a recession you know, so don't expect much sympathy for teachers on this Forum.
    I know that NQTs are still learning, but that doesn't excuse their effective hourly rate being what it is (if not less). And with performance related pay, that progression is not guaranteed (and academies, which are increasingly popular can set their own salaries anyway).

    I'm not a teacher, but I live with two trainees and work within education, so I know the pressures. NASUWT members do not have different pay to NUT/ATL etc. members, so I don't know how you can say that about their tactics. Yes, they aren't striking but they haven't been successful at solving the issues that are being struck (?) for.

    Yes, many other people may earn less, but either they work a lot less hours, or they don't have to be as qualified (often a postgrad qualification), or don't have the same level of responsibility, or a mixture of all three. You can't compare the jobs fairly like that. I'm not saying that an NQT salary is not enough to live on, but that it (and later salaries) don't reflect the amount of work done by teachers.

    And as for pensions - the contributions have increased, with less pay out at the end (not to mention the later age of being able to take it). The civil service pensions are not the 'gold standard' that they used to be. And with those increased contributions and little/no salary increase, take home pay is less (and made even less due to inflation)
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    I know that NQTs are still learning, but that doesn't excuse their effective hourly rate being what it is (if not less). And with performance related pay, that progression is not guaranteed (and academies, which are increasingly popular can set their own salaries anyway).

    I'm not a teacher, but I live with two trainees and work within education, so I know the pressures. NASUWT members do not have different pay to NUT/ATL etc. members, so I don't know how you can say that about their tactics. Yes, they aren't striking but they haven't been successful at solving the issues that are being struck (?) for.

    Yes, many other people may earn less, but either they work a lot less hours, or they don't have to be as qualified (often a postgrad qualification), or don't have the same level of responsibility, or a mixture of all three. You can't compare the jobs fairly like that. I'm not saying that an NQT salary is not enough to live on, but that it (and later salaries) don't reflect the amount of work done by teachers.

    And as for pensions - the contributions have increased, with less pay out at the end (not to mention the later age of being able to take it). The civil service pensions are not the 'gold standard' that they used to be. And with those increased contributions and little/no salary increase, take home pay is less (and made even less due to inflation)
    What proportion of teachers (and/or NQTs) aren't awarded a progression payment due to their performance?

    How is the a pension scheme with a 43rds accrual rate not 'gold standard'?

    Even ignoring progression rises, take home pay hasn't been less - due to the changes in tax and NI thresholds.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    What proportion of teachers (and/or NQTs) aren't awarded a progression payment due to their performance?

    How is the a pension scheme with a 43rds accrual rate not 'gold standard'?

    Even ignoring progression rises, take home pay hasn't been less - due to the changes in tax and NI thresholds.
    Performance related pay has only come in this year, so its impact is unknown. If NQTs pass the year, they will move up the pay scale (but the increase isn't massive), but beyond that it is unknown.

    I don't know all the ins and outs of the pensions, but my partner works in the civil service and he knows far more about it and his pension is decreasing

    According to this (http://www.thesalarycalculator.co.uk/salary.php) for the rough NQT salary (the same for each year admittedly), take home pay has gone up by about £10, but pensions contributions has gone up by more than that. And not to mention that the money is actually worth less due to inflation

    EDIT - but the strike is about more than just pay anyway, it's only one part of about 5+ things
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    According to this (http://www.thesalarycalculator.co.uk/salary.php) for the rough NQT salary (the same for each year admittedly), take home pay has gone up by about £10, but pensions contributions has gone up by more than that. And not to mention that the money is actually worth less due to inflation
    NQT is £21,800 right?

    https://www.atl.org.uk/pay/current/c...rates-2014.asp

    Pension contributions have risen 0.2%/annum

    So £43.60/year, £3.63/month
    Then its tax deductible, so its £2.91/month rise

    How is £3 more than £10?

    And as you say, thats ignoring the inflationary rise and progression.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Out of interest, are your views just your personal ones, or does this post represent the 'TSR view'? If the latter, it certainly explains a lot, as I've repeatedly detected a right wing bias to TSR.
    I'm unsure whether there's a right-wing bias or if the righties just shout louder. I'd say in general people have more pronounced political views than the general population, but you'd expect that in a political forum.
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    I think you all need to educate yourselves on the reasons why strikes and general frustration is happening among the teaching profession, before you demonise teachers.
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    but my partner works in the civil service and he knows far more about it and his pension is decreasing
    Are they in Nuvos (ie started in the Civil Service since 2007) or Classic?

    If they are in Nuvos their pension will (fractionally) increase - as the accrual rate goes from 43 to 43.1.

    If they are in Classic then fair enough if they are likely to climb the greesy pole well as they'd be moving from final to average salary. But the accrual rate goes from 60 down to 43.1, so if they are unlikely to increase their inflation adjusted earnings by 30% before retirement then they'd be better off in retirement with the change.

    The main kicker which applies to both schemes is the pension is payable at state retirement age probs 70 if you're under 30, as opposed to 65 (Nuvos) or 60 (classic). But thats slightly different to their pension 'decreasing'.
 
 
 
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