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Nottingham A100 2015 Entry Watch

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    (Original post by alex193)
    From the FAQ:

    "We will accept up to one module re-sit for every subject you are taking to full A-level, providing the re-sit is taken within the two years you are studying A-levels. The module you wish to re-sit can be an AS or A2 module"

    So it depends on how many multiples you're talking about!
    Oh! I misread this as one module re-sit over every subjects. No worries then
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    (Original post by alex193)
    From the FAQ:

    "We will accept up to one module re-sit for every subject you are taking to full A-level, providing the re-sit is taken within the two years you are studying A-levels. The module you wish to re-sit can be an AS or A2 module"

    So it depends on how many multiples you're talking about!
    Hi sorry it might be tedious for you to get asked so many similar questions but can you tell me if 697.5 is risky when applying to Nottingham?
    I have 9A* 1A 1B at GCSEs and I am an international student.

    Thanks
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    Hi, apologies for asking another similar question, but how risky is it to apply to Nottingham with 6A*s, 4 As and a C at GCSE; 830, 810, 530 and 590 band 1 in the UKCAT; and 4 As achieved at AS (with 4 As being predicted). Thanks for your time.
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    (Original post by alexSH)
    Hi sorry it might be tedious for you to get asked so many similar questions but can you tell me if 697.5 is risky when applying to Nottingham?
    I have 9A* 1A 1B at GCSEs and I am an international student.

    Thanks
    Nothing stopping you Band 1 SJT will help.

    (Original post by jp18)
    Hi, apologies for asking another similar question, but how risky is it to apply to Nottingham with 6A*s, 4 As and a C at GCSE; 830, 810, 530 and 590 band 1 in the UKCAT; and 4 As achieved at AS (with 4 As being predicted). Thanks for your time.
    Depends whether the magical mystery machine that is the admissions department looks at consistency across UKCAT fields. Your average isn't bad, but there's a couple of low section scores that could be held against you if they do look at them.
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    (Original post by smilepeople)
    I thought the earliest results were given by Oxbridge in early Jan
    Birmingham gave out first offers around November, guess its the quickest one
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    I got 665 average for my ukcat. For the gcse section ill get full marks but do you think my ukcat is enough to get an interview? ? I read u only need to be in the top fifty percent.


    My name's Alex, I'm a current third year student; Hippokrates and sumsum123 are about to start second year, Nottie is about to start first year and FissionMailed is in the heady heights of fifth year, so we've got quite a team of helpers - feel free to ask away!

    If you're thinking about posting an 'Am I Good Enough with X and Y', please first refer to the tagline for this forum, then look at the many that have already been answered... So long as you meet the academic requirements (see 'About the Application' below) and don't bomb the UKCAT, you've got a chance

    ''Discussion of individual medical schools and their courses for applicants and current students. Not for all those 'Am I Good Enough' questions.''

    Spoilered because it's a Wall of TextTM

    About the course

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    Nottingham offers a 5 year BMBS course with a compulsory integrated BMedSci in year 3 - this is a unique arrangement amongst UK medical schools, as other universities require you to take a year out to do a BSci. The course is largely lecture and lab based in the first two years, with little PBL. We do have a substantial amount of time in labs and we start clinical placements right from the beginning, which is really good - because we get this early patient interaction, we can start building our confidence and skills right from the first year rather than being thrown straight into clinical placements in year 4!

    Whilst the medical school did feel a little bit shabby and dated in places, the cafes, library, foyer and skills centre have been given a multi-million pound overhaul in Summer 2013, which has given us lots more multimedia stations, an overhaul of the library and quiet and silent study areas, and a much more appealing catering outlet for A floor. They're just finishing off work as term starts, but it all looks very shiny! The anatomy lab is also receiving some funding for some much-needed maintenance.

    Clinical Skills are taught throughout the course in our purpose-built and freshly revamped for 2013 Skills Centre, with drop-in sessions throughout the week, timetabled teaching sessions, and a whole multitude of equipment and staff to help you practice your skills for hospital visits and, of course, OSCEs. The clinical skills teaching is tied in with the curriculum, so as you learn about communication skills you'll practice taking histories, when you do the cardiovascular system you'll learn how to do a cardiac and respiratory exam... Then, we take these skills and practice on real patients during our hospital visits. I've found this a very useful way of getting comfortable with the skills; we start on each other (and the mannequins!), then simulated patients, then real patients in a clinical environment which really helps build confidence in communicating with and examining people. In addition to the timetabled clinical skills teaching, there's also drop-in sessions for us to practice.

    Nottingham has several teaching hospitals in the Trent Deanery area; the medical school is within the Queens Medical Centre, the largest hospital in the UK and our main teaching hospital. We also use Nottingham City, Derby, Kings Mill and Boston for some teaching: during the first two years, transport is provided to any placements off-campus. We also get allocated to a GP surgery in the area; again, transport is provided for those more than 2 bus rides away. We stick with the same GP and hospital for the whole of first year, and many for second year too.

    During the first 2 years, there are two exam cycles each year, in January/February and May/June. Exams are computer based (bar the OSCE and the anatomy spotter exam), with most modules being assessed as end-of-module exams with little coursework. The exceptions to this are Communication Skills and Professional Development, and the OSCE (clinical exams), which are assessed by coursework and practical examination respectively. The first year does count towards 20% of your classification, unlike other subjects, so it is definitely worth working hard - that said, the exams are quite manageable so long as you learn the material and revise sensibly

    Semester 1 (September - December) is mainly biochemistry, behavioural sciences, public health, epidemiology, histology and nerves and muscles, so it's mostly lecture based with quite a lot of lab work (microscopes, putting drugs in each others eyes etc). Although a lot of the content is pretty science-y, the lecturers do a very good job of linking the topics back to medicine, and I found this clinical relevance a great way to keep motivated - if you can see why you're learning all this stuff and how it'll be useful as a doctor, it's encouragement to keep working at it!

    Semester 2 is where it starts to get interesting, with Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Haematology and Clinical Lab Sciences modules. Nottingham is very keen on systems-based learning, meaning that everything is integrated together - for each organ system, we have the lectures on the biochemistry and functions of everything, and that's coupled with what we're doing in the dissection room so we get the structural correlates. Also, we revisit the histology labs for more microscope work and we also learn how to do physical exams (on dummies, then each other, then actual patients!). I found this a very helpful way of doing it, because we cement everything and link it back to what we've done before and what we're doing parallel to it.

    For anatomy, we're one of the few medical schools to get the privilege of doing cadaveric dissections. Personally, I believe that this is the single best tool for learning anatomy that we could possibly have; there is no way one could possibly render the intricacy and interconnectedness of the human body in books or models - getting stuck in, in the most literal sense of the phrase, is far and away the best way to truly appreciate the relationships between the structures of the human body. We work in groups of 10 to a cadaver, 5 at a time, and over the course of the year we dissect, system by system, in tandem with what we're studying in lectures. In the first term of dissection (from January) we examined the anterior chest wall, heart, lungs, mediastinum, anterior neck triangles, axillae, shoulder joint, upper arm, brachial plexus, forearm, hip, thigh, knee, leg and hands and feet. I know this sounds like a lot to get through, but the course is well-structured and in addition to the timetabled sessions, there's drop-in classes for revision where you can use the prosected remains and models to learn. There are few schools that still offer the opportunity to do this, and I certainly think it's the single best way of learning anatomy. Working with human remains is also a part of the experience - we get introduced to the fragility and mortality of the human form, and we're taught not to see the cadavers as specimens or as cases, but as our first patients. We work with them for a whole year, and in a way we're never going to know anyone in such depth again. It's a unique and privileged experience to be able to learn like this, with these donated bodies, and I really feel it's one of the best things Nottingham offers. There's a committal ceremony at the end of the year, where we get a chance to say 'thanks and goodbye' to our donors and often their families which is a very moving way to round off the course; strange as it may sound, you do form quite a 'bond' with your cadaver. The first session is a very odd experience - certainly for me, it was the first time I'd ever seen a dead person, let alone cut into one, and I felt terrible about it at first. But as the course goes on and your understanding and dissection skills grow, peeling back the layers, searching for unique variations from the norm, displaying all the parts, becomes very natural and absolutely fascinating. Most groups name their 'silent teachers' which really brings home the human aspect of it as well. As with clinical skills, there are lots of drop-in sessions in the DR during the week where the models, radiographs and some prosections are available for private study.

    The lecture notes are given for each module in a handout that includes the slides, areas for taking notes, reading lists and useful contacts - an example, in this case for my year group's MBM (biochemistry) module from the first term, is available here. Don't be fooled into thinking that you don't need to come to lectures though, there's lots of additional info to scribble down

    Semesters 3 and 4 continue generally follows the same structure as first year - teaching is systems based, and we look at the renal and endocrine systems, alimentary systems... We get to choose special interest modules in semester 4, which let us learn more about aspects of medicine that interest us. Choices are ranked on a scale of 1 to 10 - they try and avoid giving people things they really don't want, and most people (not me sadly ) end up doing things they enjoy

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    • Defects in Development
    • Diagnostic Imaging and Interpretation
    • Introduction to Psychiatry
    • Medical Microbiology
    • Molecular Diagnostics
    • Molecular Immunology and Autoimmunity
    • Molecular Medicine
    • Problem Based Learning



    Communication skills training continues through second year, as does clinical sciences.

    The BMedSci in third year takes up about 6 months, and culminates in a 10000 word dissertation about your chosen topic. There are various options for study areas, from anatomy to biochemistry. There isn't the option of taking an extra year out - if you absolutely 100% want to do a BSci, this isn't the course for you! Whilst the BMedSci is worth one fewer FPAS points than a full degree (BMedSci 1st = 3 points, 2:1 = 2 points etc, and BSci 1st = 4 points and descending), you do save on a whole year of tuition and accommodation fees and time, and still have an advantage over those who don't intercalate at all. At the end of the day, the extra degree is worth at most 4% of the FY application score, compared to the BMBS at ~30% and the SJT at 50%, so the difference between BMedSci and BSci is minimal! Towards the end of the second year, you apply to homebases for the BMedSci project - these are the broad areas in which you can work. Entry is randomised, so it can be abit of a gamble especially for the more desirable courses, but we try and make everyone as happy as possible and everyone I've spoken to, even if they didn't get their first choice, has enjoyed their project. Several people get published each year, which also adds FPAS points.

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    • Antibiotics: origins, targets and the bacterial resistome
    • Anti-cancer therapies and cardiovascular disease
    • Cancer
    • Cannabinoid Pharmacology
    • Clinical Applications of Current Neuroglia Research
    • Clinical Microbiology
    • Clinical Pharmacokinetics
    • Clinical Renal Physiology/Therapeutics
    • Cognitive Neuroscience of Neuropsychiatric Disorders
    • Critical Thinking Skills in Epidemiology and Public Health
    • Current Knowledge in Obesity
    • Development Neuroscience
    • Ethics, Economics and Empiricism
    • Immunological Aspects of Allergy
    • Innate Immunity and the Immunopathology of Inflammation
    • Lymphatic Organs and antigen presentation
    • Metabolic regulation in Health, Obesity and Diabetes
    • Methods in Public Health and Epidemiology
    • Molecular Bacterial Pathogenicity
    • Molecular Biology of Cancer
    • Neurotoxicology
    • Patient Education for Behavioural Medicine
    • Platelets in Haemostasis and Thrombosis
    • Principles of Surgical Infection
    • Respiratory Medicine
    • The Molecular Pathology of Cancer



    The second half of third year is taken up by Clinical Phase 1, and years 4 and 5 by CP 2 and 3.

    Generally, the workload is perfectly manageable in the first year - there's nothing that's harder than A level per se, but there is a bit more volume and it's a very different way of learning. As long as you keep up to date with notes (the lecture slides are provided in book form and online), use the teaching resources wisely, and don't leave revision to the last minute it's fine There's still loads of time to get involved with all the awesome stuff going on in med school and the uni - more on that later. Second year steps up a bit, and third year gets really intense, but that doesn't seem to stop anyone from coming on nights out and things



    About the application


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    Offers are based on AAA at A-level (biology and chemistry compulsory, general studies and critical thinking don't count), and 6 A at GCSE including sciences at A and English and maths at B. The UKCAT must be taken. The Nottingham website does say that they won't deviate from the AAA requirement, and I must say I don't personally know of anyone who got in with less. AS-wise, you need 4 AS passes, although if your school doesn't let you sit more than 3 that's OK, just get them to write you a letter explaining that!! AS grades need to be at least BBB in the subjects you're continuing, and a "pass" in the 4th.

    Module resits: you are allowed one module re-sit for every subject you are taking to full A-level, providing the re-sit is taken within the two years you are studying A-levels. This can be an AS or A2 module.

    Reapplicants: if you applied previously and didn't get an interview, you can reapply with no penalties. If you have previously made it to the interview stage, they won't consider your new application.

    As with all courses, you apply via UCAS. Without going into too much detail, personal statements are an important part of the pre-interview selection process, and so it's worth putting effort into making sure your PS is up to scratch. It's worth including why you want to study medicine and backing this up with things you've seen in your work experience - showing you've learned from workex rather than just sitting there like the metaphorical lemon is a big plus, as is volunteer work. Remember, TSR offers a free personal statement checking service! Nottingham are very keen on empathy and communication, and do seem to look for this in the statements too.

    Nottingham also require you to do an online questionnaire to further explore your motivations for studying medicine and why you want to go to Nottingham. Essentially it lets them ask a few standard questions that you probably won't have had space for in your PS - they're the same for everyone! It's a mixture of little gap-filling exercises, short-answer things, multiple choice (pretty much like the actual med school exams ) - there's no time limit, and you can kind of guess what they don't want you to put! The questionnaire usually seems to open after all the UCAS-y stuff closes, so late October, and the deadline is a several weeks later. This does count towards whether you'll be called for interview, so it's worth taking seriously! I have heard of people being rejected on the basis of their questionnaire answers.

    IMPORTANT - Nottingham have historically asked for a list of your work experience placements with dates and reference contact details. As such, it would be a great time-saver (and aide-mémoire for yourself!) to keep a list or notebook during your work experience of the dates, a reference and their contact details (be nice, ask them if it's OK first) and a few reminders about what you saw and did, and what stood out to you (good personal statement fuel). As always, be aware of confidentiality and don't include patient names or patient-identifiable details

    The UKCAT has grown in importance at Nottingham; in my application cycle (2012), they only used it to differentiate between borderline candidates, for the 2014 entry cycle it was 48% of the pre-interview score, and now it's 71%!! There isn't a cut-off for the UKCAT score - they award points based on your results in each of the 4 sections (equally weighted), which they use along with points for your 8 highest GCSEs, the PS, and the online questionnaire to rank all the applicants before interview. At least one candidate from last years thread got an interview with 620, but as always do as well as you can. Although there's no official guidance on the matter, I believe the different sections of the UKCAT are equally weighted?

    From the university:

    "The first stage involves ensuring you have met our minimum academic requirements as outlined in the Qualifications section above. We then score certain areas of your application and the weightings are shown below:
    Stage 2:

    If you have completed GCSE's and are studying or have completed A-levels then we score the following areas:


    • Highest 8 GCSE’s including the sciences (the three separate sciences or the science double award), maths and English language, A* and A grades. This score makes up 29% of the total score at this stage.
    • UKCAT – we will give you a score for each of the five sections of the UKCAT test, this includes scores for the four sections in the cognitive component and a score for the SJT component. The total UKCAT score makes up 71% of the total score at this stage.


    The above scores are totalled and the 50% with the highest total scores are then considered further:
    Stage 3.
    We score the personal statement and reference. This score is added to your total score from Stage 2 and applicants with the highest overall scores are invited for interview.
    If you have completed and are studying qualifications other than the above, you will be considered with other applicants in the same situation, so the above scoring applies minus the GCSE section. Again applicants with the highest total scores are invited for interview. Applicants who are on a degree course or have completed a first degree are included in this group."


    Around 2700 offers were received last year, with 750 called to interview and 246 places on offer, meaning we're oversubscribed by about 1100%! A small number of these places are prioritised for outstanding international applicants.

    Nottingham also offers the A108 Medicine with Foundation Year course, which provides a route into medicine for students from disadvantaged backgrounds subject to meeting various social and academic criteria sumsum123 is the expert!


    About the interview TO BE UPDATED

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    NB - there is a possibility that the format will change this year to a multi-mini style, 4 stations. Whether this will be pushed through in this cycle remains to be seen.
    "We are working towards implementing the multi-mini interview format for 2015/16 entry with four mini stations. We will add more information on the station formats shortly."

    Roughly 1 in 4 applications get called to interview. On the day of the interview, you'll be given a tour of the medical school by a student volunteer (I did 14 groups last year :O ) which is a really good opportunity to grill them about how they've found the course and ask for any last-minute tips. The interview is about 15 minutes, split equally into a structured and unstructured part. Some of the main things they're looking for are motivation and empathy - I honestly can't stress this enough. All the way through, try and see things from others point of view, and use this to back up your motivations for medicine. They have your personal statement with them, but no other details about you, so if you can illustrate your answer to the ubiquitous question of 'Why medicine?' with an example of something you saw in work experience, how it made you feel, what you learnt from it, how it inspired you to study medicine and how it'll make you a better doctor, you've made a very impressive case for being offered a place. The structured part of the interview gives you an ethical dilemma and asks you to explain what you'd so in the situation and why - again, they're looking for empathy and rational thinking; it's worth learning a bit about basic ethics (4 principles, capacity to consent, mental competency...). Confidentiality is a big topic within the NHS at the moment and we had a lot of teaching about it last year, so it might be beneficial to have a little look at the Caldicott Guidelines and the confidentiality policies.

    If I had to narrow it down to three main things that they're looking for, they'd be 1) an understanding of what it's like to work in medicine (multi-disciplinary teams, patient-centred treatment, holistic attitudes etc), 2) your motivations for wanting to study medicine and 3) empathy. They're not expecting you to know any great deal of science-y stuff already - we can teach you that. What they want to see is what sort of person you are and how you think. Just don't get caught on a tangent, 15 minutes isn't a long time! The interviewers are nice, they're looking to get the best out of you so they won't try and trick you or catch you out.

    General interview tips: relax and smile! If you look confident, you'll come across as confident. Sit up in the chair, don't slouch. Use your body language to help yourself seem calm and attentive, and your mind will follow Greet the interviewers as you come in - they'll introduce themselves by name and job title, and shake their hands if they offer them. When you're answering a question, give the bulk of your attention (and eye contact!) to the person who asked it - the other is taking notes, so engage with the active one. Don't be afraid to ask if they can rephrase or repeat a question if you didn't get it first time. If you need a few seconds to think, take them: it's so much better just to take a couple of moments out (although it'll feel like hours!) and give a well though out, composed and structured answer than to launch straight into it and dig yourself into a hole Don't bullsh*t - they will see straight through it, and your chances of an offer will likely plummet. If you say you've read or done something, either in your PS or in the interview, you'd better actually have read or done it because there's every chance that you could be asked something about it, and you're going to look a bit of a dweeb if you reply with 'Well actually, I sort of haven't...' At the end, if they ask you if you've got an questions, don't feel pressurised into making one up for the sake of it - if you do have one, go for it (just make sure it's not something you could have seen from the prospectus ). I just asked when I'd find out if I'd been successful. And when you leave, don't forget your coat - I had to go back and get it which was most embarrassing Seriously though, they are nice to you and if you relax - as hard as it sounds - everything will flow much more naturally. They're just people!

    They make a minority of offers very early on, but the bulk come after the end of interviews. The official spiel is something to do with not deciding until they've seen everyone so they don't accidentally exclude any amazing candidates who have later interviews. From my experience, I interviewed in late January and got an offer on the 20-something'th of March.



    About uni life

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    In one word, my first year was fun. The workload was manageable, there's loads of time to get involved with stuff going on in halls and with societies and sports, and there's certainly lots of things to do in the evenings

    Of course, everything starts off with Freshers Week - the freshers fair tent is open all week and is well worth visiting just to get an idea of what's on offer and pick up a lifetime's worth of free pens. There are different clubs on every night of the week, along with a different fancy dress theme, which was really good fun. The week ends with a grand finale at the Capitol FM arena - I didn't go as I'd come down with the dreaded freshers flu, but I'm assured it was intense Medics are, however, unique in having lectures during freshers week (boo hiss) but there's still plenty of time to go and visit all the stuff on campus and we even have our own little mini-fair in the QMC with all the medic societies. There's socs for literally everybody (Cake Soc anyone? No? Perhaps Homebrewing Society?) and also medic societies (for paediatrics, GPs, anaesthetists etc). I'm in Scrubs, the surgical society, and we have really helpful anatomy revision sessions each week, and I've also learnt how to suture and scrub in and everything - stuff you wouldn't normally be able to do till 5th year!

    Sports-wise, there's loads of uni sports and a good gym and pool right on campus (full membership is a reasonable 160ish pounds per year), and we also have special medic teams - I'm a medic rower for example, and the only difference is we're slightly less hardcore and don't schedule sessions for during lectures! The uni also has astroturf pitches and things, and there's tons of space on campus if you just want to chuck around a frisbee or something.

    On the second day, you get allocated a medic 'mum' or 'dad' - a second year mentor who'll look after you, give advice, lend you exam notes... Basically, we've done it before so we can help you out! Of course, you also have your medic grandparents and great-grandparents and cousins and everything, so there's loads of support from the students themselves. You'll also get a faculty tutor, who could be a professor or a researcher or a doctor or who checks up on you in regular tutorials and acts as a mediator between you and the uni if you do anything too heinous

    The medics tend to stick together (we have official club nights and everything!) but I've got loads of friends from my halls as well. Most people go into halls for the first year - catered is well worth the expense! The accommodation is mostly on Uni Park, with some people in self-catered in Raleigh Park or Broadgate. Nowhere is more than a 25 minute walk from the QMC, and there's a free hopper bus that connects Jubilee to the main campus and goes around lots of useful places. Transport into town is easy - buses are a flat £1 with your student card, and taxis run about £8 from uni park to the centre.

    Another fun thing medics do well is fundraising - Nottingham is really big on charity work, and Karnival is the biggest university fundraising body outside of the USA. Last year, we raised £1.6 million pounds, of which the medics alone raised an insane £250,000. Karni runs events like balls and the infamous boat party, as well as rag raids (get on a bus, go to a random city somewhere in the UK, collect in fancy dress for the day, have a 'quiet party' on the way home ) and overseas trips - a group of medics have just cycled from London to Paris, some are about to climb Kilimanjaro...

    Nightlife - let's just say that medics know how to party... Basically, there's loads of clubs and pubs if you're into that (Ocean Friday is the official, deliciously cheesy, medic night - just wait and see what happens when the Baywatch theme comes on ). There's several live gigs each week at the Capitol FM arena and Rock City (last year we had everything from Bastille and Mumford and Sons to AWOLNATION and Rihanna). Nights out are generally cheaper than in most big cities, and there's lots of events for if you fancy something quieter and/or non-alcoholic (like meeee).



    I hope this helps - if you've got any questions, fire away! Hopefully this'll get going and you'll be able to meet your potential future coursemates

    There's some handy FAQ's from the Nottingham website too [/QUOTE]
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    (Original post by Chig97)
    Hey guys

    I'm really confused whether I should apply to Nottingham. I really wanted to go but then I bombed the UKCAT (580, 720, 570, 720, Band 1) giving an average of 647.5
    But i just looked up on how they score and I got 46/55. I am really really confused about applying, because I thought I was written off but this has given me some hope

    Please be brutally honest about whether you think that this is a high enough score to get into the next round

    Thank you in advance
    Where's the source for the scoring system?
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    Hi, I really loved Nottingham and its currently top of my list! I've got it in my head, I think from the Open Day, that they no longer require you to complete a questionaire as part of the selection process after submission through UCAS. Am I mistaken? thankyou :confused:
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    I would get full marks for the gcse section and Ukcat is 665 average totalling 47/55

    Should I apply .... ive got two other risky choices ... ahhhh helpppp
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    (Original post by sabeerad)
    I would get full marks for the gcse section and Ukcat is 665 average totalling 47/55

    Should I apply .... ive got two other risky choices ... ahhhh helpppp
    Yes you should give it a shot!
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    (Original post by 2018)
    Yes you should give it a shot!

    I need to be in the top 50 percent to progress to the next stage.
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    I really want to apply, but have 45 points (690 ukcat, top 8 gcses are 6 A*, 2A). Any advice?
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    (Original post by alex193)
    Where's the source for the scoring system?
    Hey
    Sorry I don't really have a source but looking at what Efemena wrote:

    Your top 8 GCSEs are marked, with A* being 2 points and an A being 1
    The UKCAT is scored as followed: 801-900 = 9 points
    701-800 = 8 points etc

    Band 1 - 3 points
    Band 2 - 2 points etc
    band 3 - 1 point
    band 4 - application is unsuccessful

    I got 46/55, please give me some advice!! Really worried :/
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    (Original post by joolsm)
    I really want to apply, but have 45 points (690 ukcat, top 8 gcses are 6 A*, 2A). Any advice?
    Might as well if you like the uni, that's not a bad UKCAT score!

    (Original post by Chig97)
    Hey
    Sorry I don't really have a source but looking at what Efemena wrote:

    Your top 8 GCSEs are marked, with A* being 2 points and an A being 1
    The UKCAT is scored as followed: 801-900 = 9 points
    701-800 = 8 points etc

    Band 1 - 3 points
    Band 2 - 2 points etc
    band 3 - 1 point
    band 4 - application is unsuccessful

    I got 46/55, please give me some advice!! Really worried :/
    Hmm, interesting. Honestly I would be worried about the UKCAT :/
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    (Original post by alex193)
    Might as well if you like the uni, that's not a bad UKCAT score!

    Hmm, interesting. Honestly I would be worried about the UKCAT :/
    Sorry, do you mean that you would still be worried even though it's not a bad ukcat score?
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    (Original post by joolsm)
    Sorry, do you mean that you would still be worried even though it's not a bad ukcat score?
    Nyet comrade, that was in response to the other person I quoted
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    (Original post by alex193)
    Nyet comrade, that was in response to the other person I quoted
    Thanks
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    I'm confused how people are getting scores out of 55?
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    (Original post by cestlavie10)
    I'm confused how people are getting scores out of 55?
    Your top 8 GCSEs are marked, with A* being 2 points and an A being 1
    The UKCAT is scored as followed: 801-900 = 9 points
    701-800 = 8 points etc each sub section

    Band 1 - 3 points
    Band 2 - 2 points etc
    band 3 - 1 point
    band 4 - application is unsuccessful
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    (Original post by Maggie7)
    Hey I have a ukcat of 735, but my range is a bit big, from 580 - 870...
    should I still consider notts? :confused:
    You need to add up your total score.
    UKCAT: For each of the 4 cognitive components, give yourself a score:
    801-900 = 9pts, 701-800 = 8pts, 601-700 = 7pts etc. At the open day, they did not suggest that a range of marks would be a disadvantage, just said that they totalled the points from the 4 sections.
    Then add your score for SJT: band 1 = 3pts, band 2 = 2pts, band 3 = 1pt. If you get band 4 your application is rejected regardless.
    Then add your GCSE scores- top 8 GCSEs including Eng lang, Maths and Sciences - A* = 2pts, A - 1pt.
    That gives you an overall total /55 max. The top 50% will get their personal statement looked at. then the PS scores are added and the top 600 are invited for interview. As it is the first year of this system, there is no way of knowing what the cutoff will be. I emailed to ask about my score and they just repeated that there was no way of knowing the cutoff until all the applications had been assessed.
 
 
 
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