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    (Original post by Ibz5)
    Allah will create the means of twenty-seven thousand pounds being deposited into your account. It's how Allah works.
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    So 27k is going to magically appear in his bank account..?
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    (Original post by Ibz5)
    Allah will create the means of twenty-seven thousand pounds being deposited into your account. It's how Allah works.
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Rofl

    I just want to make sure I understand. Do you want to prevent a student loan due to religion, or are others around you preventing you from getting a student loan?

    If you let you're religion get in the way of student loan or any other university support then there's not a lot anyone can do for you.
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    In an earlier message in this thread, someone said that interest rates on student loans are at inflation only. That used to be the case up to 2012, but not any more. Interest on student loans now is at inflation plus 3% while you are studying, and inflation plus between 0% and 3% while you are earning, depending on income.
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    If you think a student loan is haram then don't go to university. Let someone who is not stuck in the 7th century take your place
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    The teaching of the Qur'an and the interpretations of the hadith are clear that the charging of interest (riba) is forbidden (haram). It is worth looking at some scholarly input on this.

    Student loans are not like other loans. With most loans, if you borrow twice as much, your monthly payments are twice as much. But with a student loan, your monthly payments are based on how much you are earning, not how much you borrowed. The government lends you money to go to a government-regulated and part-government-funded university. They do this because they see this as an investment in the country's future. And they only get a return on that investment if all your study means you end up earning more than £21,000 per year. If your career isn't profitable (you are earning less than £21,000 per year), they get nothing. And after 30 years, if you haven't paid it all back, what's left on your student loan is 'written off', you get let off for the rest, and it is the government's loss.

    So in a way, it is like some models of Islamic finance, because they are investing the money in your education, and they share in the profits of your career. This is the view that Sheikh Dr Haitham al-Haddad takes. Search for 'haitham student loans haram' on YouTube to find him talking about it. Search on google for 'haitham student loan fatwa' for a statement from him on this and the response of others to it.

    Also, some scholars take the view that while the charging of riba is haram (forbidden), the paying of it is makruh (undesirable, distasteful, objectionable), but not haram. That's the view that Dr Shabir Ally takes, and it's worth looking him up on YouTube (search on youtube for 'shabir ally student loans' to hear him set out his scholarly reasons for why. If Muslims won't take student loans, many Muslims won't be able to afford to go to university. So lots of intelligent and gifted Muslims will miss out on the jobs and influence they would get if they had a degree. Now, is that better or worse than taking a student loan? You have to decide.

    And it is worth looking at the intention behind the teaching on riba. Riba is bad because it makes rich people richer and poor people poorer. But student loans aren't like that. They are at a much lower rate of interest than most other loans. If you are not earning much you don't have to pay anything. And very importantly, they are a way of helping poor people (who otherwise would not be able to go to university) get richer (by getting a degree that leads to a good job).

    We can all wish that university education had remained free, but it is not so. There is no easy path – there is just a choice between multiple difficult paths. I wish you wisdom to choose well.Salaam.
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    Your point would make perfect sense, but the thing is, we have free will. Therefore everything we do we are accountable for it. Allah knows our futures but we are the ones who create them.
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    Hopefully some good news is coming on this. In the May 2016 report from the UK Department for Business Innovation and Skills called "Success as a Knowledge Economy: Teaching Excellence, Social Mobility and Student Choice", section 47 says:

    Alternative Student FinanceTo ensure participation and choice are open to everyone, we will introduce an alternative student finance product for the first time. This will be open to everyone and will not result in any advantage or disadvantage relative to a student loan, but will avoid the payment of interest, which is inconsistent with the principles of Islamic finance. We plan to legislate for the Secretary of State to offer an alternative student finance product alongside his current powers to offer grants and loans.

    So if you feel that you can't take out a regular student loan, wait a couple of years (?) until the Alternative Student Finance scheme is up and running (based on the Shariah-compliant takaful system) and use that.

    You can see the full text of the report here.
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    You got to be pretty daft to let religion get in the way of a student loan which a vast majority here in the UK do.

    This is to improve your future... Then again, this is Islam.

    Another option would be get a job for now, save the money towards your fees in future.

    One final suggestion would be go around the UK cities and ask for £1 from 74 people every day for the next year and you will have the required fees. You'll even have £10 to spend towards your books!

    Take the last suggestion lightly...
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    well said bro well said
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    RELIGIOUS QUERY REGARDING SHARIA COMPLIANT ISLAMIC STUDENT LOANS



    Assalam alaykum brother,



    I am emailing regarding clarification of the student loans.



    As you are aware they have been raised further by the government

    whilst also

    taking away the bursary/grant option which is halal.



    I know it depends on the persons situation and it differs between

    individuals.



    For e.g. I have worked in a haram absolutely degrading job flipping

    burgers in McDonald's for 3 years now and I still havent managed

    anywhere near enough. If I am to continue at this rate I dont I will

    even be able to save enough even by the age of 30.

    Second to this I have also tried looking for appeenticeships in my

    career field which is scientific but havent found much in that

    respect. Personally I feel as if these type of labour jobs would

    manke

    me depressed.



    Some scholars like Sheikh Haitham al haddad say it is allowed as the

    loan is not based on riba.

    Whilst others like Ustadh Abdirahman hassan say it is riba.



    Can you please clarify this please with regards to my sitaution ad I

    do not want to be a street sweeper.



    Jazakallah khayrun

    Brother Omar
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    (Original post by omarali1212)

    For e.g. I have worked in a haram absolutely degrading job flipping

    burgers in McDonald's for 3 years now and I still havent managed

    anywhere near enough.
    If you have lived a haram life for three years and ended up with nothing to show for it, would it be so much worse to live a haram life for three years using Student Finance and at least have a degree at the end of it? You have been making some sort of moral/religious compromise already.


    Some scholars like Sheikh Haitham al haddad say it is allowed as the

    loan is not based on riba.

    Whilst others like Ustadh Abdirahman hassan say it is riba.
    Unfortunately, you have identified the crux of the problem. Experts do not agree, so therefore there is no definitive answer. You just have to choose which of them you believe.
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    Are there not Islamic banks which can provide such loans for this purpose?

    Though I was under the impression that for the likes of Islamic mortgages, you instead pay arrangement fees or final lump sum fees etc...which just seem like interest packaged in another form tbh, I'm sure a God would see through the veil.
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    (Original post by TheGrinningSkull)
    The mere fact that you don't have any alternative choice is fine with religion as it's the lesser of 2 evils, to pay interest on the best kind of loan you can get in the UK, than not furthering your education and knowledge.

    With regard to all the comments that say religion is stupid hurdur, I would prefer a system where I wasn't forced to take out a loan for necessities, much like Scotland or Norway, and I don't see why feeling agitated on getting a loan makes you stupid, even if it comes from religion. Granted it's the best type of loan in the UK, but you still incur interest whilst studying at a high rate and then some.
    your mistaken scotland has a loan scheme you dont pay back tuition
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    (Original post by KrazyHusna)
    I have this issue too. I am starting at Kings College London. I will not sacrifice my religion for this dunya. I don't want to be involved in riba to educate myself.

    My father is helping me out significantly. But its going to be a tight squeeze as my older brother is at university at the same time. I have no other sources of finance. As a Sister, its also going to be difficult to find a job in London, as I don't want to work anywhere where there is excessive free mixing or anything like that.

    All we have is prayers. May Allah give us ease.
    Good luck finding that job.
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    (Original post by River85)
    As mentioned, it is possible to receive loans designed for Myslimswho don't wih to pay interst.

    Another optin s work and study part time through the OU.

    Or accept that Allah gave you talent and intelligence, and it is your duty to make the most of it.



    Of course interest existed at the time, and for centuries before. As long as there has been obey there have been loans. As long as there have been loans there has been interest.



    Banks are the private sector, not the public sector. I assume you are referring to banks that were bailed out during the financial crises but this is a bit different, besides, many jobs were at risk if the banks were not bailed out.

    Taxes also pay for welfare, education, health care and so on. Moreover, it is a Muslim's obligation to pay zakat (donate a certain percentage of earings to charity). I assume this is what the member means, alongside not paying interest on loans. Nowhere is it stated in Islamic teachings or tradition that taxes shouldn't be paid. Far from it.
    Not just Muslims, Christians (only ever seen it in America though) pay 10% of income to charity/church. Never heard of such a thing until recently.
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    The Islamic ruling on the UK Student Finance loan

    Paying for university fees has always been somewhat problematic for many Muslim families. Things became much more severe with the drastic rise in student fees in the UK. This has meant that many students are not able to afford studying at university. Student loans have not been much of an option either for Muslims, as many have avoided it for fear of falling into riba (interest). This has led to a large number of young Muslims missing out on a university education, and thus having their working life affected to various extents.
    This article will discuss the fatwa given by Shaykh Dr. Haitham al-Haddad in which he ruled that taking student loans is permissible, and that there is no riba involved at all. The Shaykh spent some time researching into this topic, and this article will hopefully shed light on some of the reasoning and evidences behind that ruling, so that the Muslim student seeking to apply for university may find contentment in taking the student loan without feeling that they are falling into sin. The focus will be the fatwa of the Shaykh, although other scholars have given the same ruling. Some of them gave the fatwa using slightly different reasoning to the Shaykh,[1] but the conclusion was the same. I soon intend to write something much more comprehensive mentioning the different opinions of the scholars and their evidences. For now however, this should suffice as a guide to those who are unclear on the subject; especially, those potential university students worrying about taking a loan for their studies. Those worrying should also know that the one who goes with this opinion is by the will of Allah following the view of the majority of scholars and is not following a weak or a minority opinion. This was stated by some of the highly respected scholars of fiqh in Riyadh who considered this opinion the opinion that goes along with the principles of the majority of scholars. Nonetheless, it is a strong opinion held by some highly qualified scholars.
    A summary of the fatwa
    Shaykh Haitham al-Haddad as well as a number of other scholars and fatwa organisations of the UK and Europe (including the European Council for Fatwa and Research[2]) gave the ruling that it is permissible for Muslim students to take the Student Finance university fee loan, and that there is no interest involved when one does so. This also applies to taking the maintenance loan. This ruling applies regardless of whether one pays back the ‘loan’ later on or not. In neither case is interest involved, and it is therefore permissible for everyone to take the loan, even if they have plenty of money to cover their studies.
    Some of the evidences and reasoning of the fatwa
    An essential principle that must be understood before understanding the reasoning here is that the concern of scholars when giving a verdict on something is the reality of the nature of that problem at hand; not what it is called. An example is Ginger Beer. It does not matter that it has the word ‘beer’ in its name. If it does not fulfil the conditions of a prohibited drink, then it is permissible. It would be a clear error if someone were to conclude that this drink is prohibited because its name resembles that of a prohibited drink. Similarly, an Islamic bank may call something ‘interest-free’. If the conditions of interest in Islām are fulfilled, then that transaction is prohibited, even if the company has used the term ‘interest-free’. So names and titles should not deceive us into rushing into decisions. This is a well-known fiqh principle agreed upon by the scholars.
    The same can be said about the UK student loan. They may say that there is ‘interest’ involved, or that it is a ‘loan’. If the conditions for a loan are not fulfilled, then it is not a loan; and if the conditions for riba are not fulfilled, then it is not interest.
    The UK student loans are not typical loans, and do not really resemble the loan that the Islamic jurists of the past spoke of when they spoke about loans. This is apparent in the following points:
    The loan is not actually paid to the student, so you never get hold of the money in the first place, nor do you have the choice to do with it as you wish.
    The loan is written off after 25 or 30 years.
    The loan is cancelled if you become permanently disabled.
    The loan is cancelled if you pass away.
    You are not required to pay anything if you do not earn above £21,000, even if you are very rich.
    All these things indicate that the loan here is not a standard qardh (loan) that is known by the Islamic jurists. The scholars define a loan as ‘giving tamlīk (ownership) of something, so that the same is returned later.’[3] The element of ownership is missing in the student finance loan. You are not able to spend the money as you wish. This defeats the objective of a loan in the sharī’ah. The loan that the scholars speak of is one that is to be paid off; otherwise it is closer to being a gift. This again, is not the case with the Student Finance loan. One can be earning a decent wage of £16,000 and still not be required to pay anything back. On top of that, the so-called ‘loan’ is hardly a loan because it is written off with so many reasons as mentioned above. A standard loan known in the Sharī’ah is one that must be paid back regardless, unless the creditor later gives permission to drop or cut the loan. Here, the creditor has beforehand given a list of instances when the ‘loan’ is not required to be paid back. So, to call this a loan seems quite far-fetched.
    Another key argument here is the fact that the money paid by students is only based on income. This is probably the strongest argument for the permissibility of the student ‘loan’, and should make it quite clear that it is not a loan that fulfils the conditions in the Shari’ah.
    The following explains this:
    If you ‘owe’ student finance £50,000, then you are not required to give anything back until you earn a salary of at least £21,000 per year. This is regardless of whether you have enough money to pay the ‘loan’ or not.
    This means that if you are given £1 billion as a gift or inheritance from a close relative for example, then you are still not required to pay a single penny back to student finance because they only charge on your income. This means theoretically you could be a millionaire and yet you would not need to pay back a penny. Because the agreement obligates payment on your salary and so on only, not all types of money that you have.
    This of course goes against all agreed upon types of loans in the Shari’ah. Because anyone who allows you to borrow money from them, expects you to return it back when you have it again. You cannot reply claiming that you will only pay back if you earn a certain amount, because that is not how a loan works. Doing so would be sinful without a doubt. In fact, even if when borrowing the money, you said: ‘I’ll pay you back when I earn again’, you would be obliged to pay the loan back if you have the money, regardless of where that money came from. This is because you only mentioned the salary assuming that that will be your only source of income. Everyone knows however, that if you have millions, you are expected to pay up, even if it is from other than a salary.
    The Student Loans Company on the other hand actually does not require you to pay it back unless it is from your salary and the sort. You may have lots of money, and yet you would not be expected to pay the ‘loan’ back.
    If it is not a loan, then what is it? A closer look will reveal that it is far closer in resemblance to a contract known as mudharabah (a type of investment). This is where person A wants to invest in something, and works with person B to make a profit which they share. Person A is responsible for making the initial payments, and person B is responsible for doing the work required to make the profit. The percentage that each person takes from the profit is agreed beforehand. Any loss or lack of profit is covered by person A.[4]
    This is the nature of the contract between a potential university student and Student Finance. Student Finance covers a student’s study expenses, and their studies should, as a result, increase the chances of their finding a well-paid job which, in turn, allows them to share in the profit that the student makes as a result. The profit is agreed beforehand, because how much Student Finance takes from the profit is made clear, and can be found online. If you do not make the expected profit, then that does not fall on your shoulders, and you are not required to pay anything back. So when you are paying back the money, you are not paying back a loan as they claim. Rather, they are sharing in a portion of the profit. This is exactly how mudharabah works, and mudharabah is permissible according to all the scholars as stated by ibn al-Mundhir.[5]
    No doubt, such a transaction is not the first thing that comes to mind when thinking of student loans. We have always simply accepted it to be an interest-based student loan. However, a deeper look into things shows that it resembles mudharabah much more than a loan. It is important to make our main concern the reality of the Shari’ah, and not the intention of the two parties. The issue of intention is clarified further below in the question and answer section. Further, any intricate technicalities that the Student Loans Company agrees with the student, such as the increase of the ‘loan’ and so on, does not affect that this is a mudharabah, because the profit in a mudharabah is left to the two parties to agree on as they wish, as the scholars have explicitly stated. And either way, we have established that this cannot be a loan, so even those who dispute that it falls under mudharabah cannot establish that it is a loan.
    This shows the importance of understanding the rulings on business transactions and especially the precision and extensive knowledge required. It is not as black and white as many laypeople think, because the line between ḥalāl and harām can be quite fine, and are only apparent to those well versed in Islamic Law. This is shown by the way the disbelievers in Makkah said, as Allāh stated in the Qur’ān: ‘’buying and selling is just like riba.’’[6] They claimed that there is no difference between the two. That is because the difference can sometimes be very minute. However, Allāh the All-Wise knows why one is good for us (and thus permissible) and the other is harmful (and thus prohibited).
    Finally, the important fiqh principle says: ‘’all financial transactions are permissible, until it is proven otherwise.’’[7] So the burden of proof is upon the one who claims that a certain business transaction is prohibited. The one who says it is permissible is upon the neutral and original position. This further strengthens the ruling of permissibility. We have seen that it cannot be said that the student loans are clear riba; otherwise there would not be so many scholars who say that there is no riba. So things are to be kept permissible until someone can provide sound and clear evidences to prove otherwise.
    A point of advice for Muslims in these circumstances
    I finally wanted to comment on what I saw on social media from some of those who first learnt about the fatwa at hand. Statements such as: ‘This is clearly harām’ were thrown about. If indeed, it was that clear to someone who has no expertise in Islamic Law, then it surely would have been even clearer to the many scholars who have dedicated their lives to studying the religion. This is especially the case, since these scholars spent a very long time looking into this matter. So it is important that we Muslims respect our ʿulamā and those who are far more experienced in knowledge, and that we learn to humble ourselves towards them. As the salaf used to say: ‘may Allah have mercy on a man who knows his place.’ We must fear Allāh in rushing into saying: ‘this is harām’ or ‘this is ḥalāl’. Rather, we must refer it back to the scholars who have spent many years at the feet of scholars, and not anybody who is good at public speaking and playing with the emotions of those with weak intellect and hearts.
    ‘’Say, ‘Have you seen what Allāh has sent down to you of provision of which you have made [some] unlawful and [some] lawful?’ Say, ‘Has Allāh permitted you [to do so], or do you invent [something] about Allāh?’’[8]
    Conclusion
    I have known Shaykh Haitham to be careful in his rulings, especially when it comes to riba. Despite this, I heard him say: ‘I have absolutely no doubt that there is no riba involved in the student loan’. Several experts in Islamic finance were consulted, and they concurred with his judgment, and some of the scholars even explicitly stated that this is the position of the majority of schools. This should, by the will of Allāh, put some tranquillity in the hearts of those who are so worried about the student loan.’
    Below are further answers to queries that people often have relating to this topic. See them for further information as they will give a better understanding of the topic. I did not want to include it in the main article for the sake of conciseness.
    And Allāh knows best, and success is from Him alone
    Some common questions that relate to this topic
    Q1: This is a big topic. Is it enough to rely only on the fatwa of one scholar?
    A1: Many brothers and sisters are famous for giving dawah and reminders (may Allāh accept their work), but they are not qualified to give rulings on Islamic topics, especially those topics that are of concern to the wider Muslim community. So we must understand that we can benefit from such speakers only in their fields of giving reminders. If we seek Islamic verdicts, then we must look to those who have many years of experience in the field of fatwa and fiqh.
    This article has mainly relied upon the scholars of Europe and the UK. This is based upon the well-known principle that the scholars have mentioned: ‘’a ruling is a branch of understanding the reality of the matter at hand.’’ This means that one cannot give a ruling on something unless he has full understanding of what that thing is. If a scholar wants to give a ruling regarding a certain business transaction, then he must first fully comprehend the nature and reality of that business transaction, so that he may give a correct ruling. It is therefore well known that the scholars of the past used to command people to ask the scholars of their country when it came to issues that may be specific to the people of that country. Allāh states: ‘’But if they had referred it back to the Messenger or to those of authority among them, then the ones who [can] draw correct deductions from it would have known about it.’’[9] The words ‘among them’ is a clear indicator that those most worthy of being asked are those scholars who are from amongst the people. Shaykh ʿAbdul Raḥman al-Sa’di (r) said: ‘’the lay people should not follow scholars from outside their country, because this leads to chaos and dispute.’’[10] This refers to issues that require one to live in that particular country or at least be fully aware of the circumstances surrounding the issue, as is the case with the UK student loan.
    We have seen the importance of the above ruling manifested in the student loans problem. Some of the scholars outside the UK were asked about ‘taking an interest-based student loan for studies.’ The obvious reply was that this is prohibited, because the questioner has given the mufti no other choice when he used the words ‘interest-based’. This is a big mistake. Rather, the questioner should have explained the transaction at hand and its nature in full detail. Only then can the mufti give a valid answer.
    The scholar who lives here in the UK and understands the circumstances of the country will also be more aware of the consequences of his fatwa, which is another essential principle in the science of fatwa. This is why the great companion, ʿAbdullāh b. ʿAbbās gave two different answers to the same question from two different people.[11] Because he realised that the mufti must understand the consequences of that ruling. Someone living thousands of miles away from the UK will unlikely appreciate the effect his ruling can have on the people of the UK. It is therefore a priority that one asks those people of knowledge in his country.
    If the fatwa of one scholar from the UK who specialises in this field is sufficient for us as Muslims to follow, then this is even more so the case if so many other scholars have also given the same ruling (see footnote 2). There is no doubt that this is an opinion supported by many scholars, and one that is sound and valid for every Muslim to follow by the will of Allāh.
    Q2: Shouldn’t we laymen do our own research to see what the ‘correct opinion’ is and then follow that, rather than simply trusting the opinion of some scholars?
    A2: The concept of the ‘correct opinion’ is subjective. Ask one scholar and he will tell you the correct opinion is this, and another scholar will tell you the correct opinion is that. On top of this, it is unimaginable that a layman who has little or no knowledge of the fiqh of business transactions can come to a conclusion on such a difficult topic. If it took as long as it did for jurists to come to a conclusion, then the layman will not benefit much in trying to come to their own conclusion. Further, the layman will hardly be able to appreciate the evidences and reasoning used by the scholars; and if he manages to understand, then he will not comprehend the significance of each proof. This is why Allāh commanded us to ask the people of knowledge, and He did not ask us to spend a long time doing research to find the opinion that we believe to be stronger, because most people cannot do that. Huge volumes have been written on these topics, so it is unreasonable for us to expect people to read through all this and try to come to a conclusion.
    Your duty is find a scholar who you trust (preferably from your country as mentioned above) and who you believe to be qualified in knowledge, and ask them. The answer they give you is what you should then go with, even if you did not do your own research on the topic. This is an agreed upon matter by the scholars of Ahlul Sunnah. As Imam ibn Qudamah (r) stated in Al-Rawdhah, and Imam ibn Taymiyyah (r) in Al-Musawwadah, and Imam al-Ghazzali (r) in Al-Mustasfa; the layman must ask the scholars for rulings relating to their religion, and they are not required to ask for the proofs of the scholar, nor his reasoning. It is enough to follow their fatwa as explicitly stated in the Sunnah. This was something agreed upon by the early scholars, and as ibn Qudamah (r) said, only the Mu’tazilah and other sects disagreed on this issue and said that the layman must also look into the proofs and come to how own conclusion. But this is against the ijma’ of Ahlul Sunnah. No doubt, it is good for the advanced student of knowledge who has studied for many years and perfected the Arabic language and the Islamic sciences to look into the proofs and differences of opinion, but this is not obligatory. It is enough for the layman to follow the ruling of a qualified scholar they trust.
    Q3: Neither Student Finance nor the student have an intention that this is an investment, so how can this be an investment. Surely intention matters?
    A3: Intention is not always considered, especially when the conditions of the Shari’ah are not fulfilled. For example, if person A tells person B that he wishes to give him a BMW as a gift, but person B needs to give him £1 at least in return. That one pound is so insignificant that both person A and person B consider this transaction a gift, because such an expensive car is worth thousands more, and even though person B gives him £1, that pound is nothing and therefore this surely is a gift. That is what the intention of both parties is. And if person B was to later remind person A of him selling the car, person A would probably laugh at him. As far as he is concerned, he gave him a gift and it was not a sale. Despite all this, they would both be wrong. The Shari’ah actually considers this a sale. There is no doubt amongst the scholars that this is a sale, because the pound was a requirement in the contract. So it is a mistake to say that intention always matters.
    Similarly, even though both parties in the student finance ‘loan’ think that a loan is being taken, they are mistaken as per the Shari’ah. They may well be right according to Student Finance regulations, but according to Islamic Law they are not correct. Rather, the conditions of a loan have not been fulfilled in the Shari’ah and so it is not a loan, even if their intention was otherwise.
    Q4: Some people say the loans are haram, and now I have read this. What do I do?
    A4: I explained above why the UK scholars are more worthy of being followed on matters that pertain to the UK Muslim community. Similarly, the European Council for Fatwa and Research is one of the more worthy fatwa councils of being followed than others in this case for the following reasons:
    Its members are from the great jurists of the world, such as Shaykh Yusuf al-Qardhawi
    Many of its members are from the UK or have lived here for a long time, all of whom have vast experience in Islamic Law.
    It is a large body with many members, and whenever more scholars agree on a particular matter, it is more likely to be correct.
    They work very hard in studying the circumstances of the Muslims in the UK, and understanding the reality of what the Muslim community goes through.
    It is natural that some people say it is harām to take this loan. Opinions will always vary, and people tend to be extra cautious when it comes to transactions they are not so familiar with. However, we have a great number of scholars who have looked into the matter in depth, and have ruled that it is permissible for a Muslim to do so.
    I end with another important point to keep in mind: there should not exist the glorification of harām which is common amongst young Muslims. They think that the more you believe something to be harām, the more pious you are. This is a grave error. As the great Imām Sufyan al-Thawri said: ‘true knowledge is a concession given by a trustworthy scholar. As for strictness, then that is something everyone can do.’[12] Making the permissible harām is just as grave as making the prohibited ḥalāl. The truth is that which was revealed by Allāh Almighty. If it is permissible, then that is the truth, and if it is impermissible, then that is the truth.
    Q5: But this is such a big harm to the Muslim community. Students leave university with so much debt. So how can it be made permissible?
    A5: That is where you are indeed incorrect. The exact opposite is true. The whole reason this fatwa is being pushed and spread is exactly because of its great benefit to the Muslims. If it was a harm, then even those who believed it to be permissible would remain silent. The student loan is a great benefit to the UK Muslim community, because students are not falling into riba as we stated above, and very rarely do they pay back the full amount unless they earn very large amounts of money. Those who do not earn £21,000 are immediately out of the question. They will not pay back a penny. Those who earn this amount, will pay some money, but will never pay back the full amount, because by the time they get anywhere near the £40k or sometimes £80k that they ‘owe’, the 25 or 30 years will have passed and anything remaining will be waived. Even the high earning jobs are unlikely to pay back the full amount, because graduates usually start off on £16k or maybe £20k if they are fortunate, and this only gradually goes up, and once again by the time they come close to paying it all off, the ‘loan’ will be written off by that time. This can often be the case, even for doctors who earn £50k or £60k, because medical students usually will have taken out a ‘loan’ of £70,000 altogether, which then rises quickly and may reach as high as £100,000. Once again, by the time they reach the £70k of ‘re-payment’, the 30 years will likely be up. Most graduates have not even thought about this ‘dept’ that they are in because they are not affected by it. So there certainly is no harm to the Muslim community at all.
    The student finance loan also has made life so much easier for Muslim students because they have not had to worry about working while studying or borrowing huge amounts of money. All this is assuming that the student only takes out a loan for his undergraduate studies. If he was to take further loans for an MA and a PhD, then this is even more clearly distant from paying back anything. If we assumed this to be an interest loan, then a tiny minority of students will pay back the full loan, which means that there is still a huge benefit for the community. So the fact that we have shown that this does not qualify as a loan at all means that this indeed is a major benefit for us.
    Qadi Abu Ya’la al-Hanbali (r) related in his book ‘Al-Uddah’ that Imam Ahmad (may Allah be pleased with him) was asked a question about something he considered prohibited. Rather than answering the questioner with his own opinion, he directed him to another scholar who considered it permissible. Imam Ahmad (r) wanted ease for the questioner even though he himself believed the action to be prohibited, and this was the practice of many of the pious salaf. So it is not from the practice of the salaf to want to make things haram unless they really had to; not to rush into making things prohibited, which unfortunately is the practice of some unqualified youth today. It does not mean that we follow our desires in making the haram halal, but at the same time, we should want ease for the people and follow in the footsteps of the righteous scholars.
    And Alhamdulillah firstly and lastly
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    (Original post by riz92)
    In an earlier message in this thread, someone said that interest rates on student loans are at inflation only. That used to be the case up to 2012, but not any more. Interest on student loans now is at inflation plus 3% while you are studying, and inflation plus between 0% and 3% while you are earning, depending on income.
    That's true
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    [QUOTE=absbse;70381006]The Islamic ruling on the UK Student Finance loan

    I have a question to ask, I’ll be very grateful if you could reply back


    Quote from you: ‘’ The loan is not actually paid to the student, so you never get hold of the money in the first place, nor do you have the choice to do with it as you wish''.

    Although the tuition fee is not paid to the students, the maintenance loan is paid directly to the student bank account and that also has an interest rate of inflation plus 3%, whilst studying. So for this particular ‘loan’, we as students do get the choice to do whatever we want with that maintenance loan.

    So will that still be considered haram as it’s riba?

    Quote from you: ''Shaykh Haitham al-Haddad as well as a number of other scholars and fatwa organisations of the UK and Europe (including the European Council for Fatwa and Research[2]) gave the ruling that it is permissible for Muslim students to take the Student Finance university fee loan, and that there is no interest involved when one does so. This also applies to taking the maintenance loan. This ruling applies regardless of whether one pays back the ‘loan’ later on or not. In neither case is interest involved, and it is therefore permissible for everyone to take the loan, even if they have plenty of money to cover their studies''.

    However, interest is applied to the tuition fee as well as the maintenance loan, which is 3% (while studying)
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    astagfirullah.
    you would put you iman aside for education
    you know that all the moeny you ear from the job you recieved from doing the college course will be haram.
    thus making the food you eat haram and so on...

    Saaiduna Abu Bakr Radiallahu Anhu narrated that the Prophet of Allah Sallallahu Alahi Wasalam said “That body will not enter Paradise which has been nourished with Haram” (Sunan Baihaqi)

    Saaiduna Jabir Bin Abdullah Radiallahu Anhu narrates that the Prophet of Allah Sallallahu Alahi Wasalam said, “That flesh will not enter Paradise which has grown from Haram, and all that flesh which has grown from Haram, the fire (of hell) is more worthy of it.” (Musnad Ahmad, Sunan Darimi & Sunan Baihaqi)
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    (Original post by MaidenFan96)
    Isn't educating yourself at all against Muslim? Lol
    why would education go against islam?
 
 
 
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