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Did you go to private school? watch

  • View Poll Results: Did you go to private school?
    Yes I went to private school
    118
    39.07%
    No I went to a state school
    184
    60.93%

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    Is it only me who switched to a private school which has a worse building than the brand new, modern comp school building I was at?

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    State schooled for all my life, up until Year 11. Currently in year 12 of a mixed private school.
    The best bit is that I pay nothing- 100% off fees dues to a combination of my scholarship and a bursary. So it's great.
    My last school was a state grammar, and I can't say I see all that much difference between it and the private school. However, there are some (a lot of) things that do stand out:
    1) Private school teaches things beyond the syllabus, whereas state school just stuck to the syllabus
    2) Private school gives us really hard homework and classwork, making the exam papers seem like a pisstake in comparison- in the state school, all the work was relatively simple.
    3) More opportunities, in that I've got involved with more sport, drama and clubs than I had exposure to in my last school.

    I definitely don't regret joining this school. It's an amazing school and they work us hard. Last year, 42 students out of 140 got into Oxbridge, and even more got offers. It's insane how many people they got in
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    No, I went to a state school in the bottom thirty in the UK and about five to ten people from my year of 200 students went onto university :lol:

    I don't quite know if I'd want to exchange my crappy state education for a decent private one. While my education was pretty abhorrent until about 16, you certainly learn some useful lessons going to a school where people are more interested in fighting and getting pregnant.
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    I entered state high school as a quiet but enthusiastic student with a drive to learn and do well. I'd even go as far as to say I had a little energy to spare. I left state high school physically sick, mentally shaken and with an irrational fear of any kind of place of learning. I couldn't even set foot into a university grounds because I thought it would be exactly the same as high school, I had either forgotten or lost faith in there being any other attitudes besides the apathetic, brutal and hateful attitudes displayed by students and teachers alike at the school I went to. I had grown up thinking that's just how people are, not realizing that the high school I went to was a cesspool for the worst types of people living in a particularly bad area and not the norm.

    I haven never had any experience of a private/public school (I get confused which is which), but university had a much more tolerable atmosphere, lecturers who had passion and a drive to teach and students who had a drive to learn!
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    (Original post by Powpowpowpowpow)
    I entered state high school as a quiet but enthusiastic student with a drive to learn and do well. I'd even go as far as to say I had a little energy to spare. I left state high school physically sick, mentally shaken and with an irrational fear of any kind of place of learning. I couldn't even set foot into a university grounds because I thought it would be exactly the same as high school, I had either forgotten or lost faith in there being any other attitudes besides the apathetic, brutal and hateful attitudes displayed by students and teachers alike at the school I went to. I had grown up thinking that's just how people are, not realizing that the high school I went to was a cesspool for the worst types of people living in a particularly bad area and not the norm.

    I haven never had any experience of a private/public school (I get confused which is which), but university had a much more tolerable atmosphere, lecturers who had passion and a drive to teach and students who had a drive to learn!
    Do you have any suggestions for improving state schools?
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    I went state but because of my uni and job I know a lot of private schoolers.

    We do a lot of work with Harrow (loads of partners are OHs) and most of the boys are lovely, but I fear an already confident child, as I was, would just have become very arrogant. A few patronise me a bit, I have to gently remind them I have already achieved that which they seek to.
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    (Original post by Birkenhead)
    Do you have any suggestions for improving state schools?
    I don't know what the norm is for state schools TBH, I know they can differ a lot there are some good ones and some awful ones.

    The one I went to I suspect there were outside of school factors contributing to the toxic atmosphere and lack of teaching or learning going on. A lot of the students lived in poverty, some had inattentive parents with their own problems such as drug addiction, and there's a culture around here where some people are very hard and rough with families going to war with each other and seeing toughness as everything and intelligence as something to be mocked or even beaten out of someone.

    This was coupled with teachers who a) had a desire to teach, but were broken after years of teaching there or b) cared only about getting paid (they were vocal about that one) or c) had a snobby attitude towards the less fortunate and had no expectations for their students beyond menial no-skill work.

    I have no ideas how to fix this kind of thing. It's so deeply rooted in culture I wouldn't even know where to begin. What has crossed my mind is that the school environment as it was wasn't suited for everybody. A lot of the disruptive kids, even the very dangerous and violent ones, were just very high energy who could have achieved great things if that energy had just been channelled in the right way. As far as energy goes, that school was stagnating. It was like living in the cloud of a very old fart with bits of jaggy poo floating around. What these kids needed was fresh air, lots of exercise and someone to actually have a bit of ****ing faith in them.

    I was one of the lower energy kids, actually I tended to get bullied almost non-stop by these "disruptive" types. It was just the passing down the chain of negative energy. Frustration and anger spread like a bad cold. If these kids were more happy and fulfilled, I and my peers would have done better also.

    I feel like I've only listed more problems than offered any suggestions so I'll just stop there before this post becomes even more filled with ranting.
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    Both.
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    Neither. I have been entirely home-educated throughout my studies from age 5, and I'm now 18.

    Not sure where that places me in the not-so-subtle snobbery and class divisions that saturate this thread, though; hopefully, it places me outside of them .
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    I think voluntary aided religious schools are still funded by the state and thus technically are state schools? In which case I went to a state school.
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    I went to one from the age of 9 onwards and have found unjustified stereotypes about it ever since.
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    State primary, secondary and now state sixth form college. Hasn't done me any harm so far...
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    I don't go to one, and I'm so glad. I've grown up in the real world, with underage pregnancies, drug dealers, people who have parents in prison, etc. And I'm glad, because I toughens you up, and prepares you for real life
    • Community Assistant
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    (Original post by ZSHNZ)
    Oh, whys that?

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    Basically because i still did well at a normal school. My cousin went to a private school and isnt doing any better by going there. So it hasnt proved to be worth all that money.
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    (Original post by Robertus)
    The other, and most pressing, issue is that the comprehensive school system is completely regressive. I would propose a return to a similar system as what was maintained in the 1970s and earlier, where the 11+ exam was taken by all students at the end of primary school to determine whether they would enter a regular secondary school or a grammar school - both being entirely free and state-funded. The removal of this system has meant that many lower/working class or otherwise disadvantaged children have no access to schools other than comprehensives, and in the few places where grammar schools are still maintained, the vast majority of kids sent there already come from well-off backgrounds. There needs to be a fully concentrated effort at getting the brightest children into the best possible schools at a young age, regardless of their family background; as well as an equally strong effort towards making sure regular secondary schools are of a high academic standard as well.
    I agree that the removal of the 11+ was probably a bad idea.

    But the problem with making only bright kids (or those considered bright) go to great schools and everyone else going to crap schools is that there will be people at the crap schools who don't deserve to be there, who might be late developers. I think the state comprehensive system we have now is overall slightly less unfair, heck even I fared pretty well from one in the end.

    It depends on whether you want brilliant for some, crap for everyone else, or a bit better than crap for everyone.
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    I go to state school and my boyfriend goes to a private school, however people seem to assume that all privately educated people are more intelligent which generally isn't the case. I did much better in both GCSE and AS than my boyfriend did at private school. Just because their parents have money doesn't make their children any smarter.
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    I went to a private school for Primary but actually changed to a state school in year 7.
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    Well maybe proud isnt the right word, but im sort of glad i went to a normal school rather than a private school.
    As a person that went to a private school, it doesn't half irk me when people say 'normal school'. What do you think that does on in a school that is fee paying, as opposed to a state-funded one, that makes it any less 'normal'?

    The stigma that follows me wherever I go now, especially when people I know at university find out about my schooling if they went to a state school, is something that pisses me off to no end. And people wonder why us private school people think that everyone is bitter towards us -- one only has to look at the reaction our education receives.

    Reverse snobbery is the worst form of snobbery.
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    I go to a state school, though in a very middle class, white area. I've had a few people assume that it's a private school before, though that was usually because it's Catholic and gets good results as far as I can tell. Had I lived in one of the neighbouring counties that offers the 11+, I would have taken it to try and get into a grammar school. We looked at private schools for sixth form (I was amazed, my dad opposes purely because he comes from a very poor background and seems to hold a grudge against the idea of being able to buy a 'better' education, which I suppose I can understand) but, in the end, the scholarships offered weren't enough to make it affordable and the results weren't so much better that it was worth the extra money anyway. It would have had to come out of my university savings and even that would have covered next to none of the fees. I'm pleased I stayed at my school anyway. I think, for both state and private schools, it depends on individual classmates, teachers and schools as to whether or not it's a good experience.
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    (Original post by PimpsNChuds)
    I agree that the removal of the 11+ was probably a bad idea.

    But the problem with making only bright kids (or those considered bright) go to great schools and everyone else going to crap schools is that there will be people at the crap schools who don't deserve to be there, who might be late developers. I think the state comprehensive system we have now is overall slightly less unfair, heck even I fared pretty well from one in the end.

    It depends on whether you want brilliant for some, crap for everyone else, or a bit better than crap for everyone.
    Which is why I would very strongly encourage the idea of having multiple entry points from secondary schools to grammar schools. Someone who fails to perform sufficiently well in an entrance exam at 11, for instance, may be able to take a similar - but higher level of course - exam at 13. Or you could simply allow the exam to be taken at any point, at a level equivalent to the year of school they are currently in. Then, of course, allow admission at 16 into the Sixth Form based off of GCSE results.

    Equally, I think those who fail to perform well enough at grammar schools should be threatened with losing their place and being forced to move to a regular secondary school, so room can be made for those late bloomers who didn't initially gain entry at 11.

    The major problem with the current system is that it assumes that every child needs to be educated in the same way. Bright children who can neither afford private school fees nor access any grammar schools have no choice but to attend mixed ability comprehensives. This puts them in oversized classes with a lot of kids who simply do not have the same drive or ability as they do. And no, having multiple "sets" for different abilities does not solve this problem in the long run.

    By having several different kinds of school, there is an admission that every child must have an education that pertains to their specific needs and abilities. A beneficial system may be to have grammar schools for the top achievers, academically-based secondary schools for middle achievers, and vocationally-based colleges and schools for those who benefit more from a non-academic structure. Alongside that I think the private/public schools should be allowed to exist, as an alternative option. Though I would expect less parents would be inclined to choose that option if we a had a more diverse state sector that accommodated for the varying needs of our youth.
 
 
 
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