Plane crash: Germanwings A320 crashes in French Alps Watch

the bear
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#141
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#141
in a dreadful piece of scheduling Film4 are screening Airplane! tonight
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davidguettafan
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#142
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The Germanwings co-pilot apparently locked the pilot out of the cockpit and deliberately crashed the plane

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32063587
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JVD
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#143
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Just saw this on sky news as I got in from school. Truly shocking, slightly confused as to their motive, though I'm sure all will become apparent in time.
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esbo
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#144
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(Original post by jneill)
No. It was a German national, male

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Yes I think that site was a simulator site and maybe the pilot decide to simulate the same route, but I didn't really understand what everything meant.
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esbo
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#145
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A rarther clever pilot on the pilot site had deduced the plane was flown down before the investigators.

http://www.pprune.org/rumours-news/5...ml#post8917244
Travelling in excess of VMO in a A320 disconnects the AP and triggers the high speed protections which pitch the aircraft up. This aircraft did not pitch up. Which probably means it was being over-ridden by whomever was flying it.
Bit technical but he knew it required the pilot to over ride the flight computer to fly down at such a speed.
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hskjlclcn
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#146
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Sounds like the Egypt 990 thing all over again, only with less of a struggle between pilots by the sound of it.

Imagine being the Pilot trying to get back into the cockpit, helplessly unable to do his job. Horrific.
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young_guns
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#147
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It seems quite extraordinary that this Lubitz fellow was put in charge of a civilian airliner with only 600 total flying hours under his belt. Along with the fact he was already known to be mentally ill

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3012053/Andreas-Lubitz-Germanwings-flight-9525-French-alps-crash-French-alps-Germanwings-plane-crash-Airbus-A320-Barcelonnette.html

This along with Egyptair in the late 90s would indicate they really do need to get on top of mental suitability of pilots.
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Doones
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#148
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(Original post by young_guns)
It seems quite extraordinary that this Lubitz fellow was put in charge of a civilian airliner with only 600 total flying hours under his belt. Along with the fact he was already known to be mentally ill

http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...4u9525-profile

This along with Egyptair in the late 90s would indicate they really do need to get on top of mental suitability of pilots.
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"The Lufthansa chief executive, Carsten Spohr, said Lubitz had passed all the psychological tests required for training and undergone regular physical examinations."
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young_guns
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(Original post by jneill)
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"The Lufthansa chief executive, Carsten Spohr, said Lubitz had passed all the psychological tests required for training and undergone regular physical examinations."
Sorry, I meant to link to this article

Killer co-pilot had to STOP his training because he was depressed and suffering 'burnout'

Obviously Lufhtansa's psychological tests are ****e given he had taken months off work with depression and a nervous breakdown. That is not normal.
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potatomaker
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(Original post by young_guns)
Sorry, I meant to link to this articleKiller co-pilot had to STOP his training because he was depressed and suffering 'burnout'Obviously Lufhtansa's psychological tests are ****e given he had taken months off work with depression and a nervous breakdown. That is not normal.
ithas nothing to do with that, it's because this airline doesn't have a two in the cockpit at all times system like most airlines do
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Adam171014
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#151
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Maybe Airplanes need to be remodelled slightly, atleast the cockpit door entrance to the main computing area of the plane anyway. The Captain and 3 pilots should all have the a wireless communication device on at all times and whenever going in-and-out of the cockpit for breaks, the cockpit entrance door mechanisms would be opened by the Airplane company at the base after communication from the wireless device as opposed to having to rely on someone inside the main compartment of the cockpit to open the door. Hopefully something like this never happens again but will help greatly in the future. Cannot imagine what the Captain who was locked out by his co-pilot was going through over the last 10 minutes trying to break through an impossible barrier. Damn.
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Good bloke
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#152
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(Original post by Adam171014)
The Captain and 3 pilots should all have the a wireless communication device on at all times and whenever going in-and-out of the cockpit for breaks, the cockpit entrance door mechanisms would be opened by the Airplane company at the base after communication from the wireless device as opposed to having to rely on someone inside the main compartment of the cockpit to open the door.
First, four pilots on one aircraft? :eek:

Second, ultimate control of the cockpit door is from within the cockpit, not the main compartment.

Third, the signal from base to open and close the door would never be susceptible to interference, jamming or other problems would it? :rolleyes:
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StrangerthanEleven
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#153
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Hope this guy burns in hell.

Sick *******. Wouldn't wish depression or anything like that on anyone. Awful thing to experience. But there is a million ways to kill yourself (if you feel you have to and can't be stopped) without harming others, let alone 150 innocent people.

It's not suicide, it's murder. Simple as. And I don't know how anyone can defend it or feel sorry for him.

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Good bloke
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(Original post by Dodgypirate)
. There was NOTHING found beside the Pentagon.
Apart from large bits of aeroplane, of course.
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Fullofsurprises
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#155
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I wonder if some of this is down to the low cost model of running airlines? Pilots over-strained, not enough pay and pressurised working conditions? These issues in the aviation industry have been raised before.

It will be terrible if this remains inexplicable, but presumably the police and media will now turn over every aspect of this guy, to see if they can find any factors.

Striking similarity with the Malaysian loss, which suggests that the systems for ensuring that pilots of big civil airliners remain stable and trustworthy are in trouble.
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x-pixie-x
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#156
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(Original post by neal95)
I am leaning more towards a suicide because if he wanted to cause maximum damage he wouldn't have started the descent in a remote area.
Only so many times the captain would've needed the toilet on a short flight so I reckon he would've still crashed it even if they were over a city.
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Drewski
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
I wonder if some of this is down to the low cost model of running airlines? Pilots over-strained, not enough pay and pressurised working conditions? These issues in the aviation industry have been raised before.
The guy only had 630hrs, not really enough for those kind of issues to kick in.
The low cost model does, however, mean the plane doesn't have the spare crew to ensure there are always two people on the flight deck. That's the bigger area of concern for me.
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Good bloke
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#158
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(Original post by Drewski)
The guy only had 630hrs, not really enough for those kind of issues to kick in.
However, it has, apparently, emerged that his training was interrupted at one stage by a bout of depression.
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Drewski
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(Original post by Good bloke)
However, it has, apparently, emerged that his training was interrupted at one stage by a bout of depression.
Training, though, is different to the real work. The training is genuinely much more stressful, each day could be your last, you're only ever one flight away from being culled, you have so many exams and different levels to go through... I'm not surprised that that took it out of him, I've known several close friends go through the ATPL and they all get stressed.
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Good bloke
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(Original post by Drewski)
Training, though, is different to the real work. The training is genuinely much more stressful, each day could be your last, you're only ever one flight away from being culled, you have so many exams and different levels to go through... I'm not surprised that that took it out of him, I've known several close friends go through the ATPL and they all get stressed.
Yes but being prone to depression doesn't sound a good trait for a pilot, does it?
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