David Cameron and Ed Miliband Live Q&A Watch

cole-slaw
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#141
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#141
(Original post by billyfisher100)
I wasn't referring to the current Chancellor's economic policy. I was referring to the previous Government's economic policy and you quote a completely irrelevant source.

Learn to read!

That post is about the previous Government's economic policy as well, demonstrating that they weren't running anything approaching an excessive budget deficit.


You didn't actually read the post, did you? You don't actually really know anything about economics, do you?
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whorace
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#142
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#142
(Original post by young_guns)
Farage has made a statement that he believes Ed Miliband did better;



I think tonight has put to bed the relentless months long campaign against Ed in the right-wing papers, about him being "weird" and "weak" and lacking in any sort of charm or charisma. This is what you get when the format (television, as opposed to the press) is definitionally impartial.

As a Labour supporter, I have to say that I've always had faith that Ed would come good on television because I've seen him before in person, unmediated by newspaper editors telling me what to think.

And I'm pleased that even hardened right-wing TSRians seem to be being quite impartial in their judgment of tonight's outcome. Perhaps now we can proceed onto a serious election campaign on matters of substance?
I'm moderate left but do admire Farages honesty, he may have some vile people in his party but I have always thought him a man of principle who has praised his opponents when they have given him reason to.
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DavidSilvaMCFC
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#143
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Ed Miliband did the smart thing by not answering that immigration question, if he had then the tabloid headlines tomorrow would be 'MILIBAND WANTS X NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS IN BRITAIN'
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whorace
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#144
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(Original post by DavidSilvaMCFC)
Ed Miliband did the smart thing by not answering that immigration question, if he had then the tabloid headlines tomorrow would be 'MILIBAND WANTS X NUMBER OF IMMIGRANTS IN BRITAIN'
I thought it the only question he avoided that was quite serious. As he pointed out, England has quite a high population density, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with being concerned with the numbers of migration, particularly when the government has an awful record on housing.
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whorace
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#145
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(Original post by Aj12)
It really irritated me how much that came up. Whatever the case may be Ed is the Labour Leader, his party clearly wants him there or there would have been a leadership challenge by now.

You would of thought that with all the challenges the country faces more substantial issues could have been raised. I don't have much time for Labour, but calling Miliband a geek in an interview and asking why aren't you David is just pathetic. No wonder people are so switched off to politics in this country.
It is actually in contradiction with later statements that Ed is perceived as weak leader. If Ed really does have so much opposition from his own party and the public, then the fact he has remained in power demonstrates his competence.
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Chief Wiggum
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#146
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(Original post by KingStannis)
He has to criticise the Blair government, while at the same time defending labour as a credible economic party. Doing that requires breathing time Paxman simply didn't give him. Cameron had easy questions to answer, and had more time to answer them in.
He doesn't have to criticise the Blair government, does he? He can choose to if he wants to. I guess in terms of saying stuff that will help his popularity, then yeah, he should criticise it. But if anything, that just supports my point that being outside of being in charge, and criticising anyone who was previously in charge, regardless of party affiliation, gets you support. The general public just tends to dislike the current ruling party, whoever it is.

Why doesn't Miliband stand up for his predecessors in the Labour party? Because he knows it would be an unpopular line with the general public. Being "on the outside of power", criticising the decisions that those in power are making, is a cheap and easy way to get popular support. Everyone does it. That's why Cameron was so keen to debate in 2010 but not now, and why Miliband is so keen to debate Cameron now.
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billyfisher100
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#147
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#147
(Original post by cole-slaw)
That post is about the previous Government's economic policy as well, demonstrating that they weren't running anything approaching an excessive budget deficit.


You didn't actually read the post, did you? You don't actually really know anything about economics, do you?
Probably more than you do. All you have demonstrated is that you can cite an irrelevant article without even quoting directly from it to support your argument.
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Rakas21
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#148
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#148
So VI before the debate (not properly weighted of course)
Cons 28
Lab 38
LD 6
UKIP 14
Green 6
SNP 5
VI after the debate
Cons 29 (+1)
Lab 40 (+2)
LD 5 (-1)
UKIP 13 (-1)
Green 6
SNP 5
That's the important bit. Small parties squeezed, Labour gain most.

As expected..

Lib Dem supporters broke for Miliband 52% to 48%. Ukip voters for Cameron 70% to 30%.
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whorace
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#149
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#149
(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
:rofl:





Go Ed. He fought back against Paxman very well. The Syria thing was a good response I think. Plus it very nearly seemed like Ed believed in something. Which is unusual for most politicians :indiff:

Having principles is not always a strength, I am more concerned whether those principles are practical and in the interests of the country, speaking about his beliefs was perfectly acceptable, so long as it is balanced with sound policy.
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whorace
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#150
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
He doesn't have to criticise the Blair government, does he? He can choose to if he wants to. I guess in terms of saying stuff that will help his popularity, then yeah, he should criticise it. But if anything, that just supports my point that being outside of being in charge, and criticising anyone who was previously in charge, regardless of party affiliation, gets you support. The general public just tends to dislike the current ruling party, whoever it is.

Why doesn't Miliband stand up for his predecessors in the Labour party? Because he knows it would be an unpopular line with the general public.
I never understood why he had to criticize the Blair government. He is not campaigning under the banner of New Labour, his ministers and policies are not the same. Should we question Cameron about the policies of John Major?
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KingStannis
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#151
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
He doesn't have to criticise the Blair government, does he? He can choose to if he wants to. I guess in terms of saying stuff that will help his popularity, then yeah, he should criticise it. But if anything, that just supports my point that being outside of being in charge, and criticising anyone who was previously in charge, regardless of party affiliation, gets you support. The general public just tends to dislike the current ruling party, whoever it is.

Why doesn't Miliband stand up for his predecessors in the Labour party? Because he knows it would be an unpopular line with the general public. Being "on the outside of power", criticising the decisions that those in power are making, is a cheap and easy way to get popular support. Everyone does it. That's why Cameron was so keen to debate in 2010 but not now, and why Miliband is so keen to debate Cameron now.
If he defends Blair government, he lose popularity. If he doesn't, labour loses credibility. If you're going to ask a question like that, at least make it open ended and give him a few minutes to respond.
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ChoccyPhilly
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#152
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#152
too much Ad Hominem against Milliband
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Chief Wiggum
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#153
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(Original post by whorace)
I never understood why he had to criticize the Blair government. He is not campaigning under the banner of New Labour, his ministers and policies are not the same. Should we question Cameron about the policies of John Major?
Well, I think it's a way to try to get Miliband to defend his party's previous record.

I agree that his policies are not the same. But it's to give some consistency to the questions - Cameron will obviously be asked to defend his record, so Miliband needs some similar questions. Although, because Miliband wasn't in charge with Blair, it means he doesn't actually have to defend it, and can just criticise it if he wants.

I would agree of course that Miliband should not be somehow held responsible for Blair's decisions. He has his own policies.
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DavidSilvaMCFC
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#154
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(Original post by whorace)
It is actually in contradiction with later statements that Ed is perceived as weak leader. If Ed really does have so much opposition from his own party and the public, then the fact he has remained in power demonstrates his competence.
What I'm saying is that he could not win by answering that question, there would be no correct answer, he would be torn apart by one faction or another
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k9markiii
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#155
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Cameron was so much more slick and rehearsed but I get the sense that Miliband has poor presentation but better policies. Cameron's continual talk about jobs reminded me of Frank Underwood's "America Works" scheme from House of Cards.
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quentinhamilton
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#156
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#156
Miliband is an utter idiot
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DavidSilvaMCFC
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#157
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#157
Furthermore that woman who shouted "Your poor mother" deserves a slap
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Eboracum
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#158
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#158
Miliband won tonight, no question for me. I say this as a Tory 2010 voter.

You'd expect Cameron to be showing as winner in the poll. Shows him at 54 to 46. He's always been ahead of Miliband in terms of personal ratings. And as Prime Minister you have the advantage of being able to look Prime Ministerial and good on the world stage. You get to look tough. You don't get that chance as Leader of the Opposition. Yeah but would Miliband look good on the World Stage? That's what you'd have said about Blair in 1997 and Cameron in 2010.

I loved the more sort of human and emotional side of Miliband. And I loved how he took Paxman on. Some cracking one liners. Miliband had tougher questions as well, some things that were really really personal and I felt he dealt with it well. I liked how he acknowledged some of Labour's mistakes. Not that it matters. Completely irrelevant what Labour did betwen 1997-2010, I'm sick of hearing about it. This is about what the next government will do. He looked good tonight and the poll about who would you be more likely to change your mind on is in Miliband's favour, which I think is perhaps more telling.

Cameron was poor tonight. He made the same mistake Obama made in 2012 in the first debate with Romney in terms of turning up and expecting it to be a coronation. Tonight was about expectation. For Cameron it was average to high, and he was below that for me, he looked very rattled at the start. For Miliband expectation was low, and he exceeded it.

Good job Ed.
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k4l397
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#159
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I didn't expect much to come out of tonight's Q and A - and as I expected not much seemed to. I think for those who think there should be a 'strong leader', today played a lot more in favour of Cameron. I think David Cameron (as much as I dislike his party and policies) is actually very good at taking questions and twisting them in his favour. Ed Miliband however is not so good at this, I think he has a problem at quickly turning questions in his favour and takes too long to think of what to say - he's not very good unscripted. The problem with this is he gives unclear answers and indefinite ones which puts people off - regardless of what his policies are.

The problem is a lot of people vote for the person not the party. Speaking to my Dad, he seemed pretty convinced by David Cameron but didn't seem to recognise how he dodged most questions and turned every question into one about the economy. A lot of people don't focus on the policies and are more bothered about how the parties come across through these sort of events.

Personally I'd vote for neither of them, conservatives have no recognition that you can't keep cutting public service spending and expect them to run smoothly (or they do but clearly don't have an issue with public services failing) and labour are too central and seemed to have abandoned their ideologies in hope they can appeal to more people. I personally would be more likely to vote for Greens or Lib Dems.
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young_guns
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Something really shifty that Cameron did was throughout his interview he never once mentioned Miliband or the Labour Party by name. He always called them "my opponent" or "my principle opponent".

I understand that PR pop psychology says that in doing so he is ensuring he does not give any stature whatsoever to Miliband, but it's also cheap and takes the electorate for fools. It's too calculating.
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