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    (Original post by Mrs House)
    Because it's not hard to get into
    I agree the degree programme is not hard to get into for NON- russel group universities.

    No way is it easy to get into law at the likes of Oxbridge, UCL, LSE, KCL, Warwick and Bristol who will produce lawyers earning 42k (if a TC is secured ovcourse) as their starting salary.
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    underrated eng lit?
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    (Original post by sqwertylol)
    still a naff degree. some people are fluent in a language and have a degree in something as well. learning about a countries history isn't massively important.
    if you take away the language element..a degree in something specific is better than knowing history and politics of a country
    Can you speak multiple languages fluently?

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    Underrated: Old Norse Studies.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yes, it's Oxbridge.
    Thanks for answering again, you seem very knowledgeable about IB and target unis
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    (Original post by sqwertylol)
    still a naff degree. some people are fluent in a language and have a degree in something as well. learning about a countries history isn't massively important.
    if you take away the language element..a degree in something specific is better than knowing history and politics of a country
    Funny thing that there's a growing demand for languages then isn't it. More than a third of British businesses say they suffer from a shortage of linguists.
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    (Original post by justag)
    Can you speak multiple languages fluently?

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    nope. irrelevant to the point though. there are people out there who can speak the language you could potentially learn at uni and they also do a degree in something else. they're gonna be more competitive
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    (Original post by Fleming1928)
    Funny thing that there's a growing demand for languages then isn't it. More than a third of British businesses say they suffer from a shortage of linguists.
    yeah among professionals who already have degrees. think about it - you're a british business. you have one guy who has a degree in economics but can only speak english and you have a guy who has a degree in french and can speak english too. you will take the economics guy because he is more helpful to the company in his skills.
    businesses want people with skills and language. not just one or other. but if you have to choose between one and the other they will choose skills because its more useful.
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    Over-rated: pink, fluffy subjects, under-rated: everything else
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    (Original post by sqwertylol)
    yeah among professionals who already have degrees. think about it - you're a british business. you have one guy who has a degree in economics but can only speak english and you have a guy who has a degree in french and can speak english too. you will take the economics guy because he is more helpful to the company in his skills.
    businesses want people with skills and language. not just one or other. but if you have to choose between one and the other they will choose skills because its more useful.
    Someone who wants an economics job would obviously at least have some experience. Knowing a second language would make them stand out. Learning a language which is very different from English will put the person at an even bigger advantage as it shows that they're hard working. Since you can't speak a second language, you obviously don't know how hard it is to be able to learn a second language fluently.
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    (Original post by sqwertylol)
    nope. irrelevant to the point though. there are people out there who can speak the language you could potentially learn at uni and they also do a degree in something else. they're gonna be more competitive
    There aren't in this country. Most Brits only speak English. If you speak another useful language (Punjabi or whatever doesn't count), that's an advantage and it's less competition for jobs.

    The vast majority of graduate roles don't require a specific subject anyway

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    (Original post by sqwertylol)
    yeah among professionals who already have degrees. think about it - you're a british business. you have one guy who has a degree in economics but can only speak english and you have a guy who has a degree in french and can speak english too. you will take the economics guy because he is more helpful to the company in his skills.
    businesses want people with skills and language. not just one or other. but if you have to choose between one and the other they will choose skills because its more useful.
    If the business is international that needs linguists, they'll hire a French graduate and train him up over a monolingual Economics graduate. Depends on the job.

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    (Original post by Fleming1928)
    Someone who wants an economics job would obviously at least have some experience. Knowing a second language would make them stand out. Learning a language which is very different from English will put the person at an even bigger advantage as it shows that they're hard working. Since you can't speak a second language, you obviously don't know how hard it is to be able to learn a second language fluently.
    your dismissing my example which I think is a very good example because its an economics degree and job. Take any degree, it doesnt matter. science subjects, maths, economics, history, english, psychology, law, etc etc. i can only think of a business degree being less useful than a language one because you don't need it to go into business.
    learning a language isn't that hard. requires time and effort like everything else. I intend to teach myself a language at university.
    you havent really made a counter argument to be honest. I know a 2nd language would make them stand out but in my scenario it was key to compare someone without a language and someone with. Be more open minded.
    theres 3 people in the scenario. one with a useful degree and a bilingual. one with degree and not bilingual. one with degree in language making them bilingual. if a business wants someone to enhance their business they will choose the first guy (obviously). if he hadn;t applied it would be the 2nd guy because he brings skills to the table. the 3rd person has the language and has a degree to show for it which is admirable but it's not what a business wants as a priority above all else.
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    From my experience medicine is pretty over-rated and both biology and biomed are under-rated.
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    I think one of the most over-rated degrees has to be computer science. There's alot of people who are less qualified, degrees in computing and such, getting the same jobs these people are applying for, without the added effort of a more difficult degree.

    accounting is certainly is one which is under-rated (I don't study it) , alot of money can be made in that industry and its academic grades are not practically high.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    You need the a slash in the second quote box, like this , or it won't work. Whilst your knowledge of a widely known legal case is impressive, law has the lowest rate of firsts at 10% of any subject. It is challenging. Now you're going to say Aha! But I was a law student and I studied at Essex!—without sounding rude, a lot of subjects will be easier at Essex than at a reputable university. It's not a solid foundation off which to make claims about the wider scholarship of law..
    Are you saying that one must attend a top 20/russell group to have a valid opinion of law?

    Such elitists views must surely enforce the view that law is a overrated subject?

    In any case, outside the legal field, i see it being of very little use. it truly is an un-enlightening subject
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Banks don't give a **** what you studied mate, as long as it's an actual subject.

    Obviously, this won't apply to the quant roles, that predominantly hire Maths/CS/Physics PhDs. But they represent a tiny proportion of a bank.

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    give me some roles a law student could apply to and get( that are not law specific) in a bank
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    (Original post by DIN-NARYU-FARORE)
    Are you saying that one must attend a top 20/russell group to have a valid opinion of law?

    Such elitists views must surely enforce the view that law is a overrated subject?
    Yes.

    And it's overrated for people who study it at Essex and think they are gonna become big-shot lawyers with it—it's gonna be incredibly difficult for them. The same can be said of any non-STEM subject outside the top RG/top 20~.
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    (Original post by callum_law)
    Yes.

    And it's overrated for people who study it at Essex and think they are gonna become big-shot lawyers with it—it's gonna be incredibly difficult for them. The same can be said of any non-STEM subject outside the top RG/top 20~.
    Bit presumptuous to think i want to be a lawyer. Never stated such an intention. i merely look at the field and make observations. even those going to top 10 unis are finding major difficulty landing training contracts, its a saturated field and even if you land one, the firm will take advantage during your training knowing how good you got it by winning that TC.

    What makes becoming a lawyer even worse is the complete lack of meritocracy and complete reliance on networking to get in. I dunno if this done to the same extent in other fields, but at least if you chose a stem subject your skills can be measured. law is ridiculously overrated

    However, in the times where i have attended law fairs and the like, what i gauge from recruitment HR teams and lawyers themselves is that the real issue lies in A-levels and experience, not where you went. Sure prestige will probably matter once you get through the A level barrier, but even then it becomes more a battle of experience than it is of where you went for university.


    Law is a terrible subject when it comes to mental challenging. It stimulates my arse. sure you may have better job opportunities than me due to where you went, but your opinion is no less valid than mine simply because of where you went.
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    (Original post by DIN-NARYU-FARORE)
    .
    I never said you wanted to be a lawyer. There was no presumption there.

    The point I was making was not simply one of prestige. I was talking about the relationship between the tier of university and course difficulty. For example, at your university 47% of work is assessed by coursework—this makes it a lot easier than the top 20 universities. The lower the tier, the easier the course. Another example, the people entering your course are BBB A-Level students; the people at mine are AAA. Yet, the rate of firsts across your uni and mine are around the same. Are we assume that from each student body, the top 7-10% have the same ability and that's why they get 70%+. That's not particularly parsimonious.

    There is nothing more meritocratic than exam performance. Don't try to delude yourself with the belief that people are more successful than you merely because they have good connections, and life is unfair. You had your chance and you blew it.

    Thank you, have a nice day. Next customer please.
 
 
 
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