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    (Original post by william walker)
    You do know what nationalism is and where it comes from? One institution becoming dominant within a nation. Like Puritanism, NAZI's, Fascism and Communism. It happens when the government destroys all the other institutions or takes them over. It doesn't come from what I want. Or anything I said. Also I put forward a view in support of institutions. No opposing anyone for anything else other than their political views. The fact is they want to destroy me and I simply want to constrain them and stop them creating a tyranny as the Puritans did.
    I feel asleep reading that.
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    (Original post by MrKmas508)
    I feel asleep reading that.
    I am not surprised that YOU did.
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    (Original post by william walker)
    I am not surprised that YOU did.
    I'll be in the hospital burn ward if you need me.
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    In reply to my last comment; I'd also like modular exams back. No matter what Michael Gove says, it's definitely better for students.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    I'm probably forgetting a few but, briefly, the following would be a good start:

    1. Produce a written, secular constitution which, for the time being, retains the monarch as head of state. Rescind Anglicanism's status as state religion.

    2. Replace the House of Lords with an elected upper house. Introduce a single transferable vote (STV) system for elections to both the House of Commons and the new upper house. Constitutional amendments can only be made with the approval of two-thirds majorities in both houses.

    (2a. Investigate the viability of a unicameral parliament because there's a good chance that this bicameral system might descend into the sort of gridlock seen in the U.S. Congress.)

    3. Negotiate with the monarch at the start of the fiscal year how many public engagements she and her family tend to undertake in that year and compensate them appropriately. This should mitigate the enormous waste of public money subsidising the lavish lifestyles of the monarchy. Beyond a base level of income for their everyday needs, they should work if they want more money, just like the rest of us.

    4. Scale back the NHS dramatically and turn it into a healthcare service for those who cannot afford healthcare, as assessed on a case-by-case basis. Everyone else must be required to purchase health insurance. This has the benefit of individualising the per capita costs of healthcare somewhat -- aside from the small(er) contribution to the reduced NHS, people only pay for their own healthcare costs, which may be lower than the amount that they currently pay. It makes no sense to make people who never get ill pay a lot of money into a healthcare service that they don't use. All this must be accompanied by appropriate anti-discrimination legislation so that people aren't left without insurance.

    5. Abolish child benefit. While the recent move to limit this to the first two children is a step in the right direction, it doesn't go far enough. People shouldn't be paid to have children in a country that isn't experiencing declining fertility rates. If people have children that they cannot afford, then they will be moved to foster homes with families that can afford to keep them.

    6. Get rid of tax breaks for married couples. It's not the state's job to tell people that getting married is a good idea by providing financial incentives to do so.

    7. Produce a list of companies that do not pay their workers a livable wage and subject these to additional taxes to compensate the state for the welfare payments that it has to make to their workers. It's not the state's job to subsidise cheap labour for these companies.

    8. Corporation tax to be charged on worldwide income, not what corporations claim their UK income is.

    9. Invest in building social housing to replace houses lost through Right to Buy (and get rid of that, while we're on the subject). These houses should benefit from the current designs (such as this one), which focus on reducing the carbon footprints and increasing energy efficiency and independence.

    10. Encourage a gradual move away from cars for short journeys. I'm not too sure about how this could be done, but I suppose the construction of dedicated cycle routes might be an idea, in addition to adopting the sort of bike hire scheme that they operate in London (which removes the cost barrier of actually purchasing and maintaining a bike).

    11. Maintain tax levels until the Treasury is in surplus and then start reducing taxes, starting from the lowest earners and working upwards as the numbers allow.

    12. Once a stable surplus has been achieved, experiment with a degree of choice in taxation. This would be more or less impossible to fit with PAYE because it would allow people to allocate a small proportion of their taxes, say 10 percent, to areas that they particularly feel should receive a greater share of public spending. If successful, cautiously increase the proportion that they can allocate.

    13. Introduce limits on what parties can spend on election campaigns. It should not be the case that people can win simply by having more money.

    14. Maintain the current regime on student loans with one exception: abolish the 3 percent rate of interest on top of inflation. There's no point charging interest on top of inflation on these loans. Increasing the amount owed is hardly going to translate to more revenue with the 30-year limit on repayments in place.

    15. Leave the EU and replace that relationship with a simple free trade deal. The pros and cons of this have been debated to death on other threads so I'll refrain from writing an essay about that over here. :3

    Edit: I'll add more if I can remember any.
    I don't agree with all of these, not by a long shot but repped you anyway for a clearly well-thought-out post with some interesting points.
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    (Original post by KimKallstrom)
    I don't agree with all of these, not by a long shot but repped you anyway for a clearly well-thought-out post with some interesting points.
    Haha, thanks. I don't consider it too radical but others seem to think it is (not you though -- just others I've spoken to about these things). This is actually my 'compromise manifesto.' I couldn't get away with anything if I took out the more agreeable ones. I've learned to accept that most of my views won't be accepted because I tend to hold views on principle rather than pragmatism -- my proposal is a good mix of both, I hope.
 
 
 
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