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    Benefits should be scrapped and the unemployed shipped to work houses.
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    (Original post by sw651)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    We are, my sister dropped out of school and left home at 18 thinking the benefits life would be all luxury, clearly she saw the misreprasentation
    Well it sounds as if you've swallowed the line about benefits being 'all luxury', too.

    But since when did a disposable income of £73 per week maximum, start being considered 'luxurious'?
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    (Original post by sw651)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    £72 Is the bare minimum, they dont pay housing or bills either, £72 is enough to live on, they wouldnt make it that small otherwise. Why do so many have huge tvs and the latest tech, they get additional things too
    Well, I can't imagine 10 quid a day providing a life on luxury. Maybe it's "enough" if you want to live on egg and chips and boxes of broken biscuits.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    My fields pretty basic but it fills a huge demand. I've made enough now tbh but i'll keep going.
    If you have the free time then I would devote some of it to prepping. There are some genuine reasons to do so. Its not all conspiracy theory and crazy talk.

    In the next 15 years there are some realistic threats to prep for which will happen.

    1. The result of climate change whether it is a mini ice age or higher sea levels.
    2. A Economic depression in the western world due to nations abandoning the dollar as the reserve currency.
    3. A War between the worlds super powers which will effects everyone on Earth.
    4. A Asteroid finding its way being pulled into our gravitational field.

    I've listed them from 1 to 4 out of what is likely to happen.

    NASA have stated that there is a high possibility that the global warming scientists are wrong and we are instead moving towards a mini ice age.

    You already know enough about my view on the US economy because I relate it to the wars across the world where they have attacked nations which where on the verge of dumping the petro dollar.

    There are a couple of things which could start a World War at the moment. Claims to the oil in the arctic circle, Taiwan & South Korea being invaded and the Brics nations doing the switch over to a new reserve currency.

    As for the Asteroid theory it could become a danger as of 2030 because we are entering unknown space as we move around around our Galaxy's black hole.

    These are real dangers anyway. You can debate them but they are hardly conspiracy theories.

    I think its also very important for people on welfare to prep too. Turn the back garden into a allotment space or stock pile enough staple food which can last a long time.
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    Well, at least that's something.


    I also think you need to be aware of the fact that some of the information you have gleaned from family members about the amount of money they receive in benefits is highly suspect, and quite possibly false. Perhaps they know you are anti-welfare, so tell you incorrect things to deliberately wind you up. In truth the vast majority of people struggle on benefits and do not live 'the life of Riley'.
    This is true. A lot of people just receive (as cash) job seekers allowance and nothing more. I receive more due to being disabled. But that's because the system recongises that as a disabled person, I have higher costs. JSA is intended as a short term term benefit. Whereas ESA (the benefit I claim) is generally intended as long term, hence it being more.

    The people you see on TV tend to have several children which also brings in a lot of money. You're never going to see someone just on job seekers allowance on TV struggling. They're always going to have several children by different fathers, etc. (a minority of people IRL)

    It's also worth noting that there are various schemes the unemployed can be mandated to attend, such as the Mandatory Work Programme or the Community Work Programme where claimants must work full time hours for certain organisations, or lose their benefits. The idea that all of the unemployed are simply lounging around at home, or down at Wetherspoons getting drunk is simply a myth.
    I've been on the work programme and it simply was hell Despite laws being place to protect me, (in short, the Equalities Act states you must make reasonable adjustments) they "forgot" to do a lot of things to enable me to take part in activities. They wondered why I'd then whinge. :rolleyes: I then went on to ESA because I was becoming extremely stressed, which makes my disabilities worse. I'm now in the situation where my disabilities are becoming much worse and I wouldn't be able to work. I complained to the job centre at least once who weren't impressed in the slightest.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    This is true. A lot of people just receive (as cash) job seekers allowance and nothing more. I receive more due to being disabled. But that's because the system recongises that as a disabled person, I have higher costs. JSA is intended as a short term term benefit. Whereas ESA (the benefit I claim) is generally intended as long term, hence it being more.

    The people you see on TV tend to have several children which also brings in a lot of money. You're never going to see someone just on job seekers allowance on TV struggling. They're always going to have several children by different fathers, etc. (a minority of people IRL)



    I've been on the work programme and it simply was hell Despite laws being place to protect me, (in short, the Equalities Act states you must make reasonable adjustments) they "forgot" to do a lot of things to enable me to take part in activities. They wondered why I'd then whinge. :rolleyes: I then went on to ESA because I was becoming extremely stressed, which makes my disabilities worse. I'm now in the situation where my disabilities are becoming much worse and I wouldn't be able to work. I complained to the job centre at least once who weren't impressed in the slightest.
    I was on the work programme for a couple of months. I just had to go to this place once a week to look for work on the internet. That's all it was. In fact, it was better to be on the work programme than not cos i only had to go the jocentre once in 2 weeks. If i wasnt on the work programme, i woukd have had to go to the jobcentre once a week

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    (Original post by Ebony & Ivory)
    I was on the work programme for a couple of months. I just had to go to this place once a week to look for work on the internet. That's all it was. In fact, it was better to be on the work programme than not cos i only had to go the jocentre once in 2 weeks. If i wasnt on the work programme, i woukd have had to go to the jobcentre once a week

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    You were lucky then. I had to be job searching on their computers 3 times a week. A task I was capable of doing at home. :rolleyes: I was also put on courses I couldn't do, constantly.
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    (Original post by Ebony & Ivory)
    I was on the work programme for a couple of months. I just had to go to this place once a week to look for work on the internet. That's all it was. In fact, it was better to be on the work programme than not cos i only had to go the jocentre once in 2 weeks. If i wasnt on the work programme, i woukd have had to go to the jobcentre once a week

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    How the Work Programme operates depends on the company provider, of which there are several, so customer experience of it across the country, varies greatly. Unless a customer secures a job, they are supposed to be on the Programme for two years.
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    (Original post by Lolala1234)
    Because not everyone wants to be sat at home every day being a lazy ****?! Some people take pride in their lives and work for their money instead of sponging off the state because they are too lazy to get up every morning and work
    That's an interesting kind of morality you've got there. Someone claiming a small amount of money that they are entitled to so that they can eat and have housing and heating etc. (you know, the necessities) is awful and disgusting but you stereotyping and demonising that person is perfectly acceptable behaviour.

    You are no better than me because you have a job. The (probably many small) things that interconnect in your life that mean you are working do not make you superior to me.
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    Your sister is on benefits and yet you describe yourself as 'upper class'? That sounds like a very unusual family you come from.

    People on welfare are grossly misrepresented in the media so it's no surprised that the public has a very distorted view of what the difficult reality is actually like. Most people would struggle to to live on JSA of £73 per week - indeed, many people incorrectly believe it's much higher than that.
    I think OP's made up his sister as an example TBH. I've never been on JSA and worked since A levels but she sounds like something from the Mirror.

    He was posting in another thread about how his family were all very well off :rolleyes:

    He's also only 18, finding a part time job through college is very different to finding a full time one which can support you when you aren't living with your parents. Not to mention people with degrees are often seen as overqualified
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    (Original post by illegaltobepoor)
    If you have the free time then I would devote some of it to prepping. There are some genuine reasons to do so. Its not all conspiracy theory and crazy talk.

    In the next 15 years there are some realistic threats to prep for which will happen.

    1. The result of climate change whether it is a mini ice age or higher sea levels.
    2. A Economic depression in the western world due to nations abandoning the dollar as the reserve currency.
    3. A War between the worlds super powers which will effects everyone on Earth.
    4. A Asteroid finding its way being pulled into our gravitational field.

    I've listed them from 1 to 4 out of what is likely to happen.

    NASA have stated that there is a high possibility that the global warming scientists are wrong and we are instead moving towards a mini ice age.

    You already know enough about my view on the US economy because I relate it to the wars across the world where they have attacked nations which where on the verge of dumping the petro dollar.

    There are a couple of things which could start a World War at the moment. Claims to the oil in the arctic circle, Taiwan & South Korea being invaded and the Brics nations doing the switch over to a new reserve currency.

    As for the Asteroid theory it could become a danger as of 2030 because we are entering unknown space as we move around around our Galaxy's black hole.

    These are real dangers anyway. You can debate them but they are hardly conspiracy theories.

    I think its also very important for people on welfare to prep too. Turn the back garden into a allotment space or stock pile enough staple food which can last a long time.
    1. The result of climate change whether it is a mini ice age or higher sea levels.
    2. A Economic depression in the western world due to nations abandoning the dollar as the reserve currency.
    3. A War between the worlds super powers which will effects everyone on Earth.
    4. A Asteroid finding its way being pulled into our gravitational field.

    1. I live in Birmingham not London - literally middle earth!
    2. I'm prepared for that - have everything in order and a year's supply of food at my disposal
    3. Would depend who is going for it but i have a plan
    4. Highly unlikely but we will have more than enough time to prepare just encase
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    Normally I'd make the argument against handing out public money en-mass without ensuring the country gets something back out of it. However given our pitifully low birthrates in the native population I think we need as much incentive's for people to have kids as possible, so I would be okay with child benefit. As for out of work handouts, yes but after a set amount of time getting them without work when you're fully work capable (Maybe Six months) I think a level of community service should be required so you're not just cheating the system and even if you're struggling to find a job it would keep you motivated to get out of bed in the morning.
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    (Original post by Xelfrost)
    Normally I'd make the argument against handing out public money en-mass without ensuring the country gets something back out of it. However given our pitifully low birthrates in the native population I think we need as much incentive's for people to have kids as possible, so I would be okay with child benefit. As for out of work handouts, yes but after a set amount of time getting them without work when you're fully work capable (Maybe Six months) I think a level of community service should be required so you're not just cheating the system and even if you're struggling to find a job it would keep you motivated to get out of bed in the morning.
    They're not 'handouts'. Many people who claim benefits have paid into the system - a system that's designed for everyone in the eventuality of them being unable to find work.

    As I've already stated, there are schemes in place whereby claimants must do community work or lose their benefits. They have however been heavily criticised since the number of people who are helped by such schemes is minuscule, with some research showing they actually hinder people from getting back into paid work.

    The schemes are also expensive and cost the 'hardworking taxayer' far more than if the unemployed were simply left to their own devices.
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    (Original post by Fat Rudeboi)
    I think OP's made up his sister as an example TBH. I've never been on JSA and worked since A levels but she sounds like something from the Mirror.

    He was posting in another thread about how his family were all very well off :rolleyes:

    He's also only 18, finding a part time job through college is very different to finding a full time one which can support you when you aren't living with your parents. Not to mention people with degrees are often seen as overqualified


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Just because my family is well of doesn't mean we all have unlimited money, she left home at 18 after an argument and dropped out of school. Check your facts first. And finding a job part time is not easy, I work for Next, a huge multinational, it took me over a year of looking to get that job, and the application isn't for idiots
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    (Original post by sw651)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    My sister is very real you idiot. Just because my family is well of doesn't mean we all have unlimited money, she left home at 18 after an argument and dropped out of school. Check your facts first. And finding a job part time is not easy, I work for Next, a huge multinational, it took me over a year of looking to get that job, and the application isn't for idiots
    Do 'upper class' kids work in chain stores these days? At 18, it always used to be about the gap year, traveling around SE Asia/South America on a trust fund.
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    Do 'upper class' kids work in chain stores these days? At 18, it always used to be about the gap year, traveling around SE Asia/South America on a trust fund.


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    I am still at school doing my a-levels and my parents shouldn't have to support me at uni, I want to support myself, but all employers want experience nowadays, so I need work now to get jobs at uni
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    Do 'upper class' kids work in chain stores these days? At 18, it always used to be about the gap year, traveling around SE Asia/South America on a trust fund.


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    Sorry your leftist views make you think that we aren't normal people that lead normal lives
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    (Original post by slam3000)
    Do 'upper class' kids work in chain stores these days? At 18, it always used to be about the gap year, traveling around SE Asia/South America on a trust fund.


    Posted from TSR Mobile

    And on a note, I don't have a trust fund, my parents know the value of hard work, they were born working/lower middle class and rose in the social standings and career ladders through their own hard work, they want me to be the one who is motivated to do that myself, to stop me taking my life for granted
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    (Original post by SmallTownGirl)
    That's an interesting kind of morality you've got there. Someone claiming a small amount of money that they are entitled to so that they can eat and have housing and heating etc. (you know, the necessities) is awful and disgusting but you stereotyping and demonising that person is perfectly acceptable behaviour.

    You are no better than me because you have a job. The (probably many small) things that interconnect in your life that mean you are working do not make you superior to me.
    Spot on +rep
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    (Original post by sw651)
    Posted from TSR Mobile

    And on a note, I don't have a trust fund, my parents know the value of hard work, they were born working/lower middle class and rose in the social standings and career ladders through their own hard work, they want me to be the one who is motivated to do that myself, to stop me taking my life for granted
    No, I didn't think you did have a trust fund since, as I suspected, your family is not 'upper class'.
 
 
 
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