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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    Hijab (headscarf) = fine
    Abaya (that long dress thing) = fine
    Niqab = wouldn't hire

    As an employer, I couldn't have my employee not showing their faces as they interact with others, especially if that involves customers. It looks intimidating and poses a huge safety risk.
    I would tend to agree with this as indicated in my OP. Are you an employer then? If so, what sort of work? Are there any wearing the hijab in your current workplace?

    (Original post by AccountingBabe)
    I think it would further worry employers on the employees likeliness to stay in the role over a long period of time.
    Women already have this problem where employers fear maternity leave but a woman wearing a burka etc would likely to be seen as under the authority of a man and probably would be unable to work due to having to stay at home and look after children due to cultural pressures.

    That's what I think anyways.


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    Do you mean to say they would clash with the team they're to be working in? I.e. 'cultural fit' as employers like to use the term to assess how a potential candidate would fit in with the rest of the team. I think the burka would present other issues than the ones you've outlined considering it covers pretty much everything from head to toe.

    (Original post by TeeEm)
    Isn't a burka the one that you do not even see the eyes?
    Yep, that's the one. Covers everything.

    (Original post by Leukocyte)
    Never had any problems and I wear the hijab and abaya. :erm:
    That's good to know. Are you currently in your studies then? If so, is that at university?
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    I would hire someone in a hijab but not niqab. I wouldn't know what they look like.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    That's good to know. Are you currently in your studies then? If so, is that at university?
    Yes (first year).
    Yes studying Biomedical Science at a university.
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    (Original post by Leukocyte)
    Yes (first year).
    Yes studying Biomedical Science at a university.
    Nice one - just a quick off-topic: are you continuing biomed or changing to another course after the first year?
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Nice one - just a quick off-topic: are continuing biomed or changing to another course after the first year?
    I'm continuing.
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    (Original post by IYGB)
    Final Fantasy started the thread and she is now gone!
    Relax, I'm still here and I have read every post now. Also, I'm a male.

    I'm just replying to some right now.

    Do you have anything relevant to say regarding the OP?
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    Seen many medical students who were the hijab and constantly work with the public in a very trust based field - never had problems.

    Also a few who wear the niqab - who manage to get in through medical school interviews, so can't give across bad vibes as they are some of the hardest interviews?
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    (Original post by kieran12321LFC)
    I think Muslims should criticise the people who insult Muslims before criticising the people who disagree with Islam and get on with the fact that sometime people will have views that differ to their own
    I agree that personal insults should not be acceptable and constructive criticism encouraged, for the sake of knowledge, acceptance and understanding.

    Do you have any input more relevant to the OP?
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    (Original post by Reformed)
    incorrect, the arabic for 'head ' is "raas" and is a very specific word as its used in many contexts in reference to head ie in beheading or shaving of head at hajj. This term or nothing like it is used in the verse he quotes 24:31.

    and your understanding of ' Juyoobihinna ' is simplistic. it is the plural of
    jaiyb (itself a derivative of the word jawb ie cutting/slit) which refers to the opening of the neckline of the old arabic dress - ie the low cut neck dow to bosom. so the commandment was to pull thier shawls (covers) across their necklines . again at no point is there further commandments to cover the heads or indeed the hair. These are later additions to islamic thought by your so called 'scholars' who wanted women to appear a certain way in public

    assumption can lead you to errors.



    we can show quite categorically they are not forced by the quran at all. they are compelled by islamic traditon however, becuase many hundreds of generations of ruling muslim males have imposed the idea that women should be fully covered ( sometimes head to toe) i guess to avoid tempting men, or certainly to reduce the greed of jealousy of one man coveting antoher mans wife ( property)


    as i already stated above. however khimar in classical arabic doesnt mean anything to do with the head - it simply means 'cover' and has been used to mean cover for anything and everything - from tables to windows.
    I'm not going to argue with you, but what you're saying is wrong. If you want to continue believing it then okay. I don't see why you need to argue against the hijab. The Qur'an commands women to cover up. The Prophet (saw) explained it further: women should only show their hands and faces in front of non-mahram men, and Allah (swt) commands us to listen to the teachings of the Prophet. Therefore, going by his teachings and Allah's (swt) commands, Muslim women are supposed to cover their hair, and everything else other than the hands and face.
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    (Original post by _icecream)
    No problem at all
    None whatsoever in any capacity?

    Are you currently in your studies (if so, is that at university?) or work?

    (Original post by bassbabe)
    No one should be allowed to be interviewed whilst wearing a burka, how do you know it's not some crazy killer underneath that thing?!
    That's quite an example. But essentially, I agree that there would definitely be issues at the interview stage with someone wearing a burka.
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    (Original post by yasminkattan)
    I'm not going to argue with you, but what you're saying is wrong. If you want to continue believing it then okay. I don't see why you need to argue against the hijab. The Qur'an commands women to cover up. The Prophet (saw) explained it further: women should only show their hands and faces in front of non-mahram men, and Allah (swt) commands us to listen to the teachings of the Prophet. Therefore, going by his teachings and Allah's (swt) commands, Muslim women are supposed to cover their hair, and everything else other than the hands and face.
    you are paraphrasing / innovating on what was originally written - and this is how edicts go from one thing to another - ie orders to cover womens chest go to orders to cover womens head, hair & chest, to orders to cover womens head hair chest feet face hands etc till eventually you have women walking around with a sack over them. By that stage it would be easier simply to keep them indoors if its so important to keep their body parts out of public view,

    you forget that after the quran islamic society has operated for over 1300 years and the hundreds of islamic leaders ( all men btw) have each had their inputs and re-interpretations added into the mix.

    im not against the hijab at all, im simply of the view that it is not ordained in the quran andso its not an islamic requirement. you also dont seem to relaise that the theres no specific islamic argument for a muslim to make to wear one. 'hijab' or scarf, veils, even bukhas were all worn for hundreds of years before the quran in arabic society - headscarves even were worn by the ancient romans. none were islamic , they were culturally what women wore day to day , for various reasons - ie it was the fashion


    im simply trying to explain to you what the verse actually said,the word used and their meaning, rather than simply regurgitating the justifcation to cover women up used by muslim males for the last few centuries
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    (Original post by Hirsty97)
    Hijab is fine I have no problem with, wear wtf you want. There are Jews and sects of Christians that wear headscrarves and don't get chastised by certain conservatives in society for it

    but the niqab or burqa has no place in the west and never will. It represents the worst part of Islam, wahabism, which should be banned in all countries that aren't saudi. I also don't think extremist jewish sects like the haredis, who also wear burqas should be allowed
    I also have no issue with people wearing a hijab/headscarf. I have also worked at a company where some colleagues wore a niqab - though I am not aware of the recruitment process they went through.

    I agree about the burka and would personally want to see someone's face and expressions when interacting with them, engaging in conversation, meetings, interviews etc.

    (Original post by al_94)
    What's wrong with you people? You have to turn everything onto a religious debate. At 2AM in the morning smh
    It's been really interesting to see views held on different sides. I'm more interested in personal experiences - which is mainly what I'm replying to, but I have left this thread in the D&CA section in the case of debates and constructive criticism.
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    Noone should be restricted from expressing their culture if it isnt an impediment to anything,.

    But Practical point here- specifically on the niqab and full burkha -say interviewed Ayeesha and she knew her onions and therefore gave her the job. but one day she doesnt feel like going into work and sends her mate Fatima in her burkha instead- this is fraud. and how would anyone know?

    its a slippery slope
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    (Original post by Aceadria)
    I've taken part in hiring two women in my last job who wore the hijab during their interviews. Not once was this brought up during the assessment process and they were both superior applicants.

    Experiences were very neutral.
    That's good to hear. What sort of company or department is this and the type of role? Are you still working there? Have the two women fit it well with the rest of the team and are they still employed?

    To the best of your knowledge, have they faced any difficulties, raised concerns etc.?

    I personally don't agree with a lot of Islam's teachings but that does not mean I discriminate against people for it. I can see why wearing the hijab may make a candidate feel discriminated against. But I think it's important for them to know that not everyone who interviews is a bigot.
    I am very glad that you don't. Thank you for your input, Aceadria, this the first most relevant response to the OP that I've had the pleasure to read.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    I would tend to agree with this as indicated in my OP. Are you an employer then? If so, what sort of work? Are there any wearing the hijab in your current workplace?
    Nah, I've not even finished my A Levels, just speaking hypothetically

    But I have plenty of friends and relatives who wear hijab and abaya to work and they face no problems at all
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    I agree that personal insults should not be acceptable and constructive criticism encouraged, for the sake of knowledge, acceptance and understanding.

    Do you have any input more relevant to the OP?
    I think it makes sense that employers would view those that turn up to an interview in a Niqab or Burka as less employable because they aren't showing their face. Don't see why they should have a problem with Hijabs though
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    Nah, I've not even finished my A Levels, just speaking hypothetically

    But I have plenty of friends and relatives who wear hijab and abaya to work and they face no problems at all
    Thank you, Serine Soul. I hope this reassures you somewhat then and wish you the very best in your studies.

    Keep placing yourself in hypothetical situations and in other people's shoes so-to-speak. You never know what fate has in store for you.
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    (Original post by hudamh)
    Hijab wearing barristers are practically non existent, and I fear that the reason is because they are immediatley written off if they wear the hijab. In 21st century Britain, surely we can accept brilliantly intelligent and academic hijab wearers?
    When I apply to become a barrister in the near future, I'd want to be judged based on my ability to reason and to put forward an arguement, and not based on my appearence.
    you cant write this all off to prejudice of the hijab - that would be lazy, you should know this being a law student

    there is also the issue that the islamic community in the uk has traditionally underperformed in producing numbers of top edicational candidates ( compared to perhaps others)

    and perhaps the bigger issue in terms fo female muslim- is that islamic tradition and culture does nothing to encourage girls to acheive levels of higher education and aim for high profile and high earning jobs. often high performing muslims have had to by-pass islamic tradition, and perhaps adopt more western style modernist approach to education to acheive above male contemporaries
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    Hijab is fine. I guess it'd depend on the type of job for the niqab or burka
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    That's good to hear. What sort of company or department is this and the type of role?
    I hope you don't mind if I don't give too many details as I'd like to maintain as much anonymity as possible. But it was in front office financial services for an international bank. The position was entry-level, research work (mostly working with senior analysts and associate to do financial models and to plug into reports). I never worked directly with them, but was asked to interview them to give a different opinion.

    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Are you still working there? Have the two women fit it well with the rest of the team and are they still employed?
    I left the company a little while back to take on another role. I am still in touch with their boss (odd e-mail and messages here and there). They are indeed still there, but I don't know if they've been promoted. They were talented so I would be surprised if they weren't.

    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    To the best of your knowledge, have they faced any difficulties, raised concerns etc.?
    I'm sorry, I don't know the answer to this. I'll ask next time I speak to their boss

    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    I am very glad that you don't. Thank you for your input, Aceadria, this the first most relevant response to the OP that I've had the pleasure to read.
    You're welcome. I just want to say that discrimination will happen but more than anything they should focus on trying to be the best person they can be and to keep trying. Disagreement is part and parcel of being a diverse community but as long as both parties can work well together and add value, then faith and personal choices should not come in the way. Whether this actually happens or not is an entirely different debate .
 
 
 
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