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Why do some English people still look down on Ireland? watch

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    (Original post by otester)
    England managed to subdue Ireland so ever since they've been considered inferior, apart from most of Northern Ireland because they were protestant settlers (ours).
    They look down on us too. Having lived in England for quite a while, I have come to the conclusion that they don't care about the union or the rest of the countries in it.

    Also please do realise that most people in England don't care about religion nor attend church services.
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    I never noticed anything like this. Maybe it's just people from London who have never been anywhere else in the UK and quarrel with each other over whose postcode is more central?
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    (Original post by Frostyjoe)
    They look down on us too. Having lived in England for quite a while, I have come to the conclusion that they don't care about the union or the rest of the countries in it.

    Also please do realise that most people in England don't care about religion nor attend church services.
    You're definitely higher up the "pecking order" though, what you need to remember is Britain is very classist, and anyone seen as an inferior "class" will get "pecked on", like people in Essex or "northerners" etc.

    But even those above are ridiculed by those bellow them.
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    (Original post by otester)
    England managed to subdue Ireland so ever since they've been considered inferior, apart from most of Northern Ireland because they were protestant settlers (ours).
    Let's not get too ahead of ourselves here. Ireland was "subdued" by Henry II, a king who was born in France, died in France and spoke only French (and a bit of Latin). In reality, England and Ireland were both subdued by the Normans and formed part of a wider European empire of which England emerged as the occupied centre of government.

    People seem to forget that the Norman conquest - couched though it was in the propaganda of legitimacy - was little more than a very successful invasion and annexation that never ended. What's more, it affected every corner of the British Isles - and the interest of the Norman King of England in Ireland was initially to prevent the creation of a rival Norman state.

    (Original post by Frostyjoe)
    They look down on us too. Having lived in England for quite a while, I have come to the conclusion that they don't care about the union or the rest of the countries in it.
    I'm from Scotland. I care about Scotland and the UK, albeit in a fairly abstract sense. Were you to narrow this down and ask if I give a toss about Caithness, or Staffordshire - places I've never so much as bothered to visit - the answer would be a fairly relaxed shrug.

    I'm not remotely surprised that plenty of people in England feel much the same about Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. At least two of these countries have caused a disproportionate amount of bother to the UK.
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    The lack of care in their part is more of an arrogance thing.
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    (Original post by Frostyjoe)
    Hi, I'm from Northern Ireland. I've moved to England (South) for university this year so this post is related to my experiences thus far.

    Anyway, I have come across alot of ignorant people who aren't very aware of cultures outside their own region. In regards to Ireland as a whole, some people that I have met still think that Ireland is a very poor country with no resources.

    For instance, I have met a female who is particularly ignorant and almost always boasts about her town and local area. She thinks that there is nothing as great as England and that Ireland is just a backwater dump. While England does have many, many fantastic places, there are also many, many places that are rife with crime and poverty. The town that I have moved to itself is quite isolated from other regions, I get the impression that it's an area that doesn't get as much funding from Westminster. I have travelled quite moderately, to me the area that I am in now is a typical middle class town, it's not out of this world and it's not cosmopolitian and bussling like London. I have certainly been to far better places in the world.

    Alot of English people seem to think that we in Ireland live very sheltered lives. Alot of people I talk to think that it is a completely foreign land and are surprised when we have motoroways, Tesco etc. TBH, they give me the impression that they think that we live in cottages and use horse and karts.

    It's quite comical actually. Ireland isn't that different to England, I don't know where this view comes from. Do English people in general, just not travel outside their own regions? Do they learn about other countries in School? Why do people in this country still have such ancient views?
    Early modern Ireland (1536–1691)Main article: Ireland 1536–1691Conquest and rebellionMain articles: Tudor conquest of Ireland and Kingdom of Ireland
    From 1536, Henry VIII decided to conquer Ireland and bring it under crown control. The Fitzgerald dynasty of Kildare, who had become the effective rulers of Ireland in the 15th century, had become unreliable allies of the Tudor monarchs. They had invited Burgundian troops into Dublin to crown the Yorkist pretender, Lambert Simnel as King of England in 1487. Again in 1536, Silken Thomas Fitzgerald went into open rebellion against the crown. Having put down this rebellion, Henry resolved to bring Ireland under English government control so the island would not become a base for future rebellions or foreign invasions of England. In 1541 he upgraded Ireland from a lordship to a full Kingdom. Henry was proclaimed King of Ireland at a meeting of the Irish Parliament that year. This was the first meeting of the Irish Parliament to be attended by the Gaelic Irish chieftains as well as the Hiberno-Norman aristocracy. With the institutions of government in place, the next step was to extend the control of the English Kingdom of Ireland over all of its claimed territory. This took nearly a century, with various English administrations either negotiating or fighting with the independent Irish and Old English lords. The Spanish Armada in Ireland suffered heavy losses during an extraordinary season of storms in the autumn of 1588. Among the survivors was Captain Francisco de Cuellar, who gave a remarkable account of his experiences on the run in Ireland.[22]

    The re-conquest was completed during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I, after several brutal conflicts. (See the Desmond Rebellions, 1569–73 and 1579–83, and the Nine Years War, 1594–1603, for details.) After this point, the English authorities in Dublin established real control over Ireland for the first time, bringing a centralised government to the entire island, and successfully disarmed the native lordships. However, the English were not successful in converting the Catholic Irish to the Protestant religion and the brutal methods used by crown authority (including resorting to martial law) to bring the country under English control, heightened resentment of English rule.

    From the mid-16th to the early 17th century, crown governments carried out a policy of land confiscation and colonisation known as Plantations. Scottish and English Protestant colonists were sent to the provinces of Munster, Ulster and the counties of Laois and Offaly. These Protestant settlers replaced the Irish Catholic landowners who were removed from their lands. These settlers formed the ruling class of future British appointed administrations in Ireland. Several Penal Laws, aimed at Catholics, Baptists and Presbyterians, were introduced to encourage conversion to the established (Anglican) Church of Ireland.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Ireland
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    Because they live in Carlisle?
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    (Original post by Frostyjoe)
    The lack of care in their part is more of an arrogance thing.
    Pah, I don't buy it. People generally don't give much of a **** about places, even within their own country, that are outside of their range of experience. That's human nature - and does little more than highlight how silly the idea of huge, encompassing nations of millions of people are.
 
 
 
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