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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    "I just need an explanation for this not the answers thank you xxx "

    Lol X =1.5 Y = 2


    Can you do a few example questions on reciprocal of indices.

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Yasss thank you!

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    Trust me you can do this! With practice you'll be there with maths in no time. Just do plenty of papers now (and throughout Year 11) however the biggest mistake you can make is doing papers without 1) marking them actively and 2) correcting them.

    Read the mark schemes for the questions you get wrong and follow the exam board's line of working understanding as you go along (this is active marking). Then go ahead and cover both the mark scheme and your old working and try doing the question again on a fresh piece of paper and marking.

    Maybe you would want to try re-attempting the question 20-30 minutes after you read the mark scheme and understand it in order to ensure its sunk it and you're not regurgitating from your short term memory!

    Hope I could help!
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Can you do a few example questions on reciprocal of indices.

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    Do you mean the graph of a reciprocal? I'm not too sure what you mean?


    Left is what I think you mean, on the right is a wild guess of what you could mean, considering you were just revising graphs.

    can you just point out which one you mean

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    (Original post by yepthatsme)
    Trust me you can do this! With practice you'll be there with maths in no time. Just do plenty of papers now (and throughout Year 11) however the biggest mistake you can make is doing papers without 1) marking them actively and 2) correcting them.

    Read the mark schemes for the questions you get wrong and follow the exam board's line of working understanding as you go along (this is active marking). Then go ahead and cover both the mark scheme and your old working and try doing the question again on a fresh piece of paper and marking.

    Maybe you would want to try re-attempting the question 20-30 minutes after you read the mark scheme and understand it in order to ensure its sunk it and you're not regurgitating from your short term memory!

    Hope I could help!
    THANK YOU SO MUCH! :yy::yy:

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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    Do you mean the graph of a reciprocal? I'm not too sure what you mean?


    Left is what I think you mean, on the right is a wild guess of what you could mean, considering you were just revising graphs.

    can you just point out which one you mean

    Lol
    You know Indices.

    Like this...
    Could you do a few examples on number 4 and 5 pleasee "



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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Lol
    You know Indices.

    Like this...
    Could you do a few examples on number 4 and 5 pleasee "



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    http://www.mrbartonmaths.com/resourc...ve-indices.pdf

    Have a look through this - it has tons of questions. I don't have time to write up questions (I'm a little busy right now), but I'll be able to help you with them if you get stuck or any answers you want checking.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    http://www.mrbartonmaths.com/resourc...ve-indices.pdf

    Have a look through this - it has tons of questions. I don't have time to write up questions (I'm a little busy right now), but I'll be able to help you with them if you get stuck or any answers you want checking.
    THANK YOU VERY MUCH♥♥

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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    http://www.mrbartonmaths.com/resourc...ve-indices.pdf

    Have a look through this - it has tons of questions. I don't have time to write up questions (I'm a little busy right now), but I'll be able to help you with them if you get stuck or any answers you want checking.
    When you're free and done can explain these please? Or anyone just need at least an example and understanding of the wording.


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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    When you're free and done can explain these please? Or anyone just need at least an example and understanding of the wording.


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    Here's how I would a approach that question.

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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    Here's how I would a approach that question.

    Will do this after indices.
    So I got how to do the others but not the fractional ones.

    I did them like this. The red ones I got wrong. The rest were right.


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    For those that are saying do past papers you have to remember that if you are currently in year 10 like me then we will do the new GCSE's in 2017 which means there are no past papers to do.
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Will do this after indices.
    So I got how to do the others but not the fractional ones.

    I did them like this. The red ones I got wrong. The rest were right.


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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    Hmmm it's the fractional powers.
    Those are the hard ones.

    Where does the 2 and 1 go?

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Hmmm it's the fractional powers.
    Those are the hard ones.

    Where does the 2 and 1 go?

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    A number to the power of 1/2 is the same as that number square rooted

    So if 1/2 = the square root, then 1/3 = cube root, etc...

    Now lets say, a number to the power of 2/3, it would be the cubic root of that number squared.
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    How's this?

    How would I do this?


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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    How's this?

    How would I do this?


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    The first question you wrote, are you sure that's a 7?
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    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    The first question you wrote, are you sure that's a 7?
    I made that question up.

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    How's this?

    How would I do this?


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