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AQA Level 2 Certificate in Further Mathematics UNOFFICIAL MARKSCHEME Paper 2 watch

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    (Original post by GCSESTUDENT5000)
    I found it OK. I reckon A^ will be about 145
    Tbh it was quite a challenging paper overall, so yeah i agree it prob will be 145! Lets hope its reasonable mark to get an A then lol
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    Idek what I've done wrong and what I've done right now OMG LOL.
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    (Original post by iwouldn'tworry)
    Thank you so much! It didn't occur to me to set up a triangle; I was just messing around with triginometric identities!
    You could also do it using the trigonometric identities, in fact:
    1) tany=(p+1)/(p-1);
    2) substitute (siny/cosy) into tany to give:
    (siny/cosy)=(p+1)/(p-1);
    3) square both sides of the equation to give:
    sin^2(y)/cos^2(y)=(p+1)^2/(p-1)^2;
    4) substitute (1-sin^2(y)) into (cos^2(y)) and get:
    sin^2(y)/1-sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2/(p-1)^2;
    5) multiply both sides by (1-sin^2(y)) and then by (p-1)^2 to give:
    (p-1)^2 * sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2 * (1-sin^2(y));
    6) expand both sides to give:
    sin^2(y)p^2 - 2sin^2(y)p + sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2 - [sin^2(y)*p^2 + 2sin^2(y)p + sin^2(y)];
    7) expand that further to give:
    sin^2(y)p^2 - 2sin^2(y)p + sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2 - sin^2(y)p^2 - 2sin^2(y)p - sin^2(y);
    8) eliminate same terms on both sides and get the rest to the other side:
    2sin^2(y)p^2+2sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2;
    9) factorise the right-hand side by taking (2sin^2(y)) out of the bracket:
    2sin^2(y)*[p^2 + 1]=(p+1)^2;
    10) divide both sides by 2(p^2 +1):
    sin^2(y)=[(p+1)^2]/2[p^2 + 1);
    11) square-root both sides of the equation to get the final answer:
    siny=(p+1)/sqrt(2p^2 +2)

    This method is VEEERY long and quite confusing, so I wouldn't go this way in the actual exam if the same sort of question came up again, say, next year in an A-level Maths or Further Maths paper. As mentioned earlier, try to visualise anything you can't directly deal with using algebra.
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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    .
    Do you have the paper?


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    (Original post by Chittesh14)
    Do you have the paper?


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    No. Do you?
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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    You could also do it using the trigonometric identities, in fact:
    1) tany=(p+1)/(p-1);
    2) substitute (siny/cosy) into tany to give:
    (siny/cosy)=(p+1)/(p-1);
    3) square both sides of the equation to give:
    sin^2(y)/cos^2(y)=(p+1)^2/(p-1)^2;
    4) substitute (1-sin^2(y)) into (cos^2(y)) and get:
    sin^2(y)/1-sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2/(p-1)^2;
    5) multiply both sides by (1-sin^2(y)) and then by (p-1)^2 to give:
    (p-1)^2 * sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2 * (1-sin^2(y));
    6) expand both sides to give:
    sin^2(y)p^2 - 2sin^2(y)p + sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2 - [sin^2(y)*p^2 + 2sin^2(y)p + sin^2(y)];
    7) expand that further to give:
    sin^2(y)p^2 - 2sin^2(y)p + sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2 - sin^2(y)p^2 - 2sin^2(y)p - sin^2(y);
    8) eliminate same terms on both sides and get the rest to the other side:
    2sin^2(y)p^2+2sin^2(y)=(p+1)^2;
    9) factorise the right-hand side by taking (2sin^2(y)) out of the bracket:
    2sin^2(y)*[p^2 + 1]=(p+1)^2;
    10) divide both sides by 2(p^2 +1):
    sin^2(y)=[(p+1)^2]/2[p^2 + 1);
    11) square-root both sides of the equation to get the final answer:
    siny=(p+1)/sqrt(2p^2 +2)

    This method is VEEERY long and quite confusing, so I wouldn't go this way in the actual exam if the same sort of question came up again, say, next year in an A-level Maths or Further Maths paper. As mentioned earlier, try to visualise anything you can't directly deal with using algebra.
    Do you do GCSE? That's insanely clever


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    (Original post by 1jonam16)
    Do you do GCSE? That's insanely clever


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    Thanks, bro ; I did do my GCSEs last year, and I do like Maths, too. I do not think, however, that what I have done was that clever: I just used the only two trigonometric identities I know and then kept rearranging to get the answer; again, though, I do really appreciate your compliment!
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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    No. Do you?
    No, hence why I asked you lol. I don't want it now though - can't remember anything.


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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    Thanks, bro ; I did do my GCSEs last year, and I do like Maths, too. I do not think, however, that what I have done was that clever: I just used the only two trigonometric identities I know and then kept rearranging to get the answer; again, though, I do really appreciate your compliment!
    Haha I suppose your modest as well do you do a level maths and further maths then? But yh o
    I wouldn't expect a GCSE student to be able to do that


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    (Original post by Chittesh14)
    No, hence why I asked you lol. I don't want it now though - can't remember anything.


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    Lol
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    (Original post by 1jonam16)
    Haha I suppose your modest as well do you do a level maths and further maths then? But yh o
    I wouldn't expect a GCSE student to be able to do that


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    To be honest, I did a huge research back in late Year 9 (or early Year 10 - can't remember), which was about the maths behind special relativity and basic quantum mechanics; that's probably where I got the "A-level" mentality from. Lol.
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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    To be honest, I did a huge research back in late Year 9 (or early Year 10 - can't remember), which was about the maths behind special relativity and basic quantum mechanics; that's probably where I got the "A-level" mentality from. Lol.
    Well that's a total lie isn't it
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    (Original post by MaxHSloan)
    Well that's a total lie isn't it
    ... No. I was just interested when a guy told me that time isn't going at the same speed when people are travelling at different speeds, so I started researching more about it. Trust me: I am not the only one. I've seen many guys like me who made a research about something advanced at a younger age than one at which they would learn about it in school/university.
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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    ... No. I was just interested when a guy told me that time isn't going at the same speed when people are travelling at different speeds, so I started researching more about it. Trust me: I am not the only one. I've seen many guys like me who made a research about something advanced at a younger age than one at which they would learn about it in school/university.
    If you were clever enough to understand the maths behind special relativity you'd have took your GCSE an got an A* when you were younger and would be doing A Level maths by now and would be on course for an A^. Also how does understanding special relatively make it so you can use trig identities in a place they didn't need to be used and was a waste of time using them. Doesn't make you any smarter using a more complicated way
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    (Original post by MaxHSloan)
    If you were clever enough to understand the maths behind special relativity you'd have took your GCSE an got an A* when you were younger and would be doing A Level maths by now and would be on course for an A^. Also how does understanding special relatively make it so you can use trig identities in a place they didn't need to be used and was a waste of time using them. Doesn't make you any smarter using a more complicated way
    I never said I was smart, and nor did I say you had to use this unnecessarily complicated way. The only reason I mentioned my research is because I was asked whether I was doing Maths A-levels, and, certainly, I didn't want to show off or brag. As for taking my Maths GCSE in Year 9 (or 10), I did think of that, but I just thought it was too risky and decided I would rather do it without any pressure on me in Year 11. Doing my GCSE in Year 9 is also useless, as it doesn't give me any benefit.

    PS Understanding special relativity DOES make it so I can use trig identities smartly - it gives me the skill and ability to use logic. Tell you sthg: before that research, I was barely getting Cs in Maths.
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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    I never said I was smart, and nor did I say you had to use this unnecessarily complicated way. The only reason I mentioned my research is because I was asked whether I was doing Maths A-levels, and, certainly, I didn't want to show off or brag. As for taking my Maths GCSE in Year 9 (or 10), I did think of that, but I just thought it was too risky and decided I would rather do it without any pressure on me in Year 11. Doing my GCSE in Year 9 is also useless, as it doesn't give me any benefit.

    PS Understanding special relativity DOES make it so I can use trig identities smartly - it gives me the skill and ability to use logic. Tell you sthg: before that research, I was barely getting Cs in Maths.
    Fair enough incredible to believe you were a C grade lol


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    (Original post by MathsMaxMapsMats)
    I never said I was smart, and nor did I say you had to use this unnecessarily complicated way. The only reason I mentioned my research is because I was asked whether I was doing Maths A-levels, and, certainly, I didn't want to show off or brag. As for taking my Maths GCSE in Year 9 (or 10), I did think of that, but I just thought it was too risky and decided I would rather do it without any pressure on me in Year 11. Doing my GCSE in Year 9 is also useless, as it doesn't give me any benefit.

    PS Understanding special relativity DOES make it so I can use trig identities smartly - it gives me the skill and ability to use logic. Tell you sthg: before that research, I was barely getting Cs in Maths.
    But it isn't using trig identities smartly and with logic. It's over complicating something that is way easier than you are making it. So it isn't logic and skill really is it.
 
 
 
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