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If you don't get in to Oxbridge, does it mean you are inferior? Watch

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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    Oxbridge didn't have the degree I wanted to do because chemical physics is so darn specialised. Only about 30 people apply for it each year. Natural sciences at Cambridge wasn't specialised enough and Oxford wasn't any better. Besides, have any of you seen just how grotty Cambridge's accommodation is? The Corpus Christi canteen has a food standard rating of 3. My local run-down fish and chips shop has a rating of 5, and that place is falling apart. If you've applied to Corpus, you might want to reconsider.
    Just curious, why would you want to do chemical physics right away? My impression of the sciences was that it is always better to do something more broad and THEN specialize. e.g. Mechanical Engineering > Aviation Engineering, Chemistry > OChem, so on.
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    Oxbridge didn't have the degree I wanted to do because chemical physics is so darn specialised. Only about 30 people apply for it each year. Natural sciences at Cambridge wasn't specialised enough and Oxford wasn't any better. Besides, have any of you seen just how grotty Cambridge's accommodation is? The Corpus Christi canteen has a food standard rating of 3. My local run-down fish and chips shop has a rating of 5, and that place is falling apart. If you've applied to Corpus, you might want to reconsider.
    I'd eat cowdung daily for the sake of living in an ancient place like Corpus Christi.
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    I guess I'm superior to everyone who wasn't offered an interview and inferior to everyone who was offered a place post-interview
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    (Original post by Confusedschubert)
    Just curious, why would you want to do chemical physics right away? My impression of the sciences was that it is always better to do something more broad and THEN specialize. e.g. Mechanical Engineering > Aviation Engineering, Chemistry > OChem, so on.
    Because the quantum world is what religious people call "God." On the smallest level, fundamental particles interact to produce nuclei and atoms. These the interact to produce molecules, salts, solutions, etc. Everything is created by the quantum world. You can't build a house without first knowing how to make the materials needed. Likewise, we'll never truly understand how the universe works if we don't understand the quantum world.

    That, and the fact that it's so indescribably beautiful that those who catch a mere glimpse of it end up dedicating their whole existence to it. I had such a glimpse while investigating ways to lower the activation energy of combustion. To do so I had to the various reactive oxygen species, during which time I saw the unfathomable power of the hydroxyl radical, a molecule which governs life, death and aging as well as having played an instrumental part in our evolution. The ROS are what drives the cycle of life, death, decay and reproduction. But even their power pales in comparison to that of the smaller particles.

    In the quantum world it's possible to pop into and out of existence spontaneously, exist in more than one location simultaneously, transfer information instantly with quantum entanglement (a phenomenon wherein whatever happens to one entangled particle happens to the other instantaneously, independently of the distance between them), have liquids climbing up walls, seemingly teleport through unbreachable obstacles, have atoms simulating nucleons in what's known as a super atom (for instance 13 aluminium atoms in this state will simulate a bromine atom, the two are chemically indistinguishable), have atoms smoodging together into one giant super particle, have conductors with zero resistance and liquids with zero viscosity, among so much more (longest sentence I've ever written too). I don't understand why anyone would want to study anything else. Life's too short so I want to spend as much of it as possible studying the particles I love so much.
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    Is theoretical physics a good fit for someone like you? String/m-theory describes a lot of phenomena that you're talking about.
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    No-I didn't apply to Oxbridge because they were everything I didn't want in a uni.

    I have absolutely zero regrets
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    (Original post by Peroxidation;[url="tel:66405371")
    66405371[/url]]Because the quantum world is what religious people call "God." On the smallest level, fundamental particles interact to produce nuclei and atoms. These the interact to produce molecules, salts, solutions, etc. Everything is created by the quantum world. You can't build a house without first knowing how to make the materials needed. Likewise, we'll never truly understand how the universe works if we don't understand the quantum world.

    That, and the fact that it's so indescribably beautiful that those who catch a mere glimpse of it end up dedicating their whole existence to it. I had such a glimpse while investigating ways to lower the activation energy of combustion. To do so I had to the various reactive oxygen species, during which time I saw the unfathomable power of the hydroxyl radical, a molecule which governs life, death and aging as well as having played an instrumental part in our evolution. The ROS are what drives the cycle of life, death, decay and reproduction. But even their power pales in comparison to that of the smaller particles.

    In the quantum world it's possible to pop into and out of existence spontaneously, exist in more than one location simultaneously, transfer information instantly with quantum entanglement (a phenomenon wherein whatever happens to one entangled particle happens to the other instantaneously, independently of the distance between them), have liquids climbing up walls, seemingly teleport through unbreachable obstacles, have atoms simulating nucleons in what's known as a super atom (for instance 13 aluminium atoms in this state will simulate a bromine atom, the two are chemically indistinguishable), have atoms smoodging together into one giant super particle, have conductors with zero resistance and liquids with zero viscosity, among so much more (longest sentence I've ever written too). I don't understand why anyone would want to study anything else. Life's too short so I want to spend as much of it as possible studying the particles I love so much.
    Those are really broad, overarching statements. Did you take inspiration from your personal statement?
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    (Original post by Confusedschubert)
    Those are really broad, overarching statements. Did you take inspiration from your personal statement?
    Hahaha no, though it does look that way. That's how I genuinely feel about it. The quantum world is like real-life magic, it's just so awesome!
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    (Original post by THUG*LYF)
    Yes well engineering as a general course at Cambridge or Oxford with specialisation later on will allow you to make way more money in your life - it's a lot more prestigious

    Imperial is good tho
    Good? I dare say Imperial is as good at Biochemistry than Oxford even though it has lower entry requirements. Imperial is a forerunner in Civil Engineering especially, Cambridge is probably better in the ranks but not sure about Oxford.
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    Well no particularly if you didn't apply for instance in my industry it's better to get a degree from some where like Southampton or Solent because top employers like ARM tend to want people who have some technical skills not only book smarts


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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    My sister worked at McKinsey for a few years and she reported a mix of grads and postgrads there, with an emphasis on the redbricks, Warwicks and Oxbridge, but not quite as exclusive as you make it sound.
    They are trying to diversify for underrepresented groups. However, if you are male, it's almost 75% chance you went to Oxbridge; the other 25 being LSE, Warwick, Imperial, LBS or places like Durham/Bristol.

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