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    law. not many people who study law end up practicing law and its difficult to get a training contract unless you go to a top tier university.
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    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    Mostly correct. Although it sometimes depends on what type of field you're heading into in finance. Mathematicians have a marked advantage when it comes to understanding stochastic analysis and more mathematically demanding prerequisites.

    Plus, stop putting down Galois Theory! Wonderful subject
    True, I'll give you that. And tbf, Galois was just to give a hyperbolic effect, it looks like a v interesting area.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    #logic

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    ? Which logic do you disagree with.
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    (Original post by TenthBelt1993)
    ? Which logic do you disagree with.
    With almost all other degrees certain quantitative avenues are closed.

    As such Maths is the best degree to get into finance.
    That bit^

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    Law grad here from a middling uni and Law is probably the correct answer. Everyone thinks you're really clever but hardly anyone gets a training contract. Half of the time you need a law degree to get a non-graduate law job to give you the experience to get a training contract so while there is money to be made from law it is, for most people who pursue law, a very long term process. The over saturation is so bad that I've seen legal apprenticeships at the £6.70 per hour apprentice minimum wage for law graduates with LLB and LPC qualifications.
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    (Original post by TenthBelt1993)
    Hahahahahhahahahahahhahhahahaha

    (I did Greek and Latin up to A-Level)

    I graduated from Oxford, please see the 2.2 rate in Classics vs the 2.2 rate in the sciences.

    Most classicists don't work that hard and can just choose the 'soft' options as they can from their course. (All of the philosphy modules that are in english rather than greek/latin). They just skip the difficult language work and do philosophy papers where they are guaranteed at least a 2.1.

    Please only talk about stuff you know...
    Degrees are what you make of them. Classics can be the hardest, most fulfilling degree of them all, it has the scope to be. If you take it seriously. Perhaps it's true that students these days elect for easier modules. If so, I'm sorry that you're letting the side down. I never did it - but my dad, my aunt and my grandmother all did it, two of whom at Oxford, and they're some of the cleverest, most accomplished people I know. Maybe it has lost its edge after all - perhaps we should all do soulless courses like Law now. But I'm holding people like you accountable.

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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    Degrees are what you make of them. Classics can be the hardest, most fulfilling degree of them all, it has the scope to be
    How can you say this about such a multidisciplinary subject - literature, archeology, ancient history, language, philosophy, etc, and then condemn PPE for being comprised of 3 broad areas?

    PPE was casually called 'modern greats' because it was supposed to prepare students for civil service life in the same way greats did in the past, using modern tools. I don't understand how you could say that about one and not the other. I also asked about NatSci earlier for a similar reason because you seem to be contradicting yourself.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    That bit^

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    Which degrees can get you into Quantitive roles at banks? Only Chemistry/Maths/Physica/Enginneering - that is equivalent to "almost all".

    I don't really see how you can disagree with Maths being the best to get into finance.

    It prepares you extremely well for interviews - as well as any other degree and keeps EVERY door open. (Which a finance degree does not - as finance degrees are a bit of a joke)
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    (Original post by TenthBelt1993)
    Which degrees can get you into Quantitive roles at banks? Only Chemistry/Maths/Physica/Enginneering - that is equivalent to "almost all".

    I don't really see how you can disagree with Maths being the best to get into finance.

    It prepares you extremely well for interviews - as well as any other degree and keeps EVERY door open.
    Yeah, but you said Maths is THE best, instead of one of the best. Arguably, that would go to Engineering because they also have the option to become engineers if they so wish.

    Ofc Maths is one of the best but not the definitive best.

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    I want to study medicine now :sad:
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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    Degrees are what you make of them. Classics can be the hardest, most fulfilling degree of them all, it has the scope to be. If you take it seriously. Perhaps it's true that students these days elect for easier modules. If so, I'm sorry that you're letting the side down. I never did it - but my dad, my aunt and my grandmother all did it, two of whom at Oxford, and they're some of the cleverest, most accomplished people I know. Maybe it has lost its edge after all - perhaps we should all do soulless courses like Law now. But I'm holding people like you accountable.

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    Holding people like me accountable? What does that mean? I studied Maths and hate law degrees.

    So your logic relies on anecdotal evidence (about your family) to come to your conclusion .

    In terms of difficulty classics can not really compare to Maths/Physics/Chemistry. And fulfilling is a silly subjective term.

    I was always going to be a classicists until I realised how in terms of academic difficult they didn't not compare to the sciences.
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    How can you say this about such a multidisciplinary subject - literature, archeology, ancient history, language, philosophy, etc, and then condemn PPE for being comprised of 3 broad areas?

    PPE was casually called 'modern greats' because it was supposed to prepare students for civil service life in the same way greats did in the past, using modern tools. I don't understand how you could say that about one and not the other. I also asked about NatSci earlier for a similar reason because you seem to be contradicting yourself.
    The comment on PPE was tongue-in-cheek, though it should be said that the void between economics (with an allegedly heavy mathematical element) and politics or philosophy is greater than, say, between ancient literature and Ancient history or Latin, or between the natural sciences. But this is not a major area of debate as far as I'm concerned. If you're passionate about each subject, a multi-disciplinary degree, I'm sure, can be a good choice.

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    (Original post by lucabrasi98)
    But law actually is overrated.

    Edit: Also I'd add Aerospace engineering. Mechanical engineers can get into virtually all graduate schemes they do. But Aerospace engineers can't get into all mechanical engineering graduate schemes. Despite that, people think aerospace is the most prestigious engineering discipline.

    And apparently it's not the hardest either (contrary to popular belief). My friends in 3rd and 4th doing various engineering disciplines claim that electrical engineering becomes so difficult that it's ridiculous. It becomes even more horrible if you're doing it at a good uni.
    I can confirm, even though I didn't do electrical engineering at uni level, in college, even though I was proficient at maths, physics and mechanical engineering, when it came to electronics I was suddenly illiterate.

    And I don't think Engineering degrees are overrated at all (someone said it). Never met an engineer without a job. But it's true that some subjects require you to me flexible in location in order to earn it, but I'm cool with that.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yeah, but you said Maths is THE best, instead of one of the best. Arguably, that would go to Engineering because they also have the option to become engineers if they so wish.

    Ofc Maths is one of the best but not the definitive best.

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    Things can be joint best..

    And discussing finance only. Maths is the only course that could give you a background in Stochastic Calculus (not that you know what that is I assume) which is extremely relevant in certain areas of finance.

    We were discussing finance roles not engineering ones..
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    (Original post by TenthBelt1993)
    Things can be joint best..

    And discussing finance only. Maths is the only course that could give you a background in Stochastic Calculus (not that you know what that is I assume) which is extremely relevant in certain areas of finance.

    We were discussing finance roles not engineering ones..
    Lol, I know what stochastics are - anyone who takes an interest in quant finance would know

    And fair enough, if you say those subjects are joint best, sure.

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    (Original post by tanyapotter)
    why have so many people cited medicine as the most overrated degree? it does lead to direct employment success..
    What people are saying is that it is not as academically rigorous as people think... Apparently...
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Lol, I know what stochastics are - anyone who takes an interest in quant finance would know

    And fair enough, if you say those subjects are joint best, sure.

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    'What stochastics are' hahahahahahha wtf is a stochastic.

    Go on then explain (in 1-2 sentences) what Stochastic Calculus is and why it's very important in finance.
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    (Original post by TenthBelt1993)
    Holding people like me accountable? What does that mean? I studied Maths and hate law degrees.

    So your logic relies on anecdotal evidence (about your family) to come to your conclusion .

    In terms of difficulty classics can not really compare to Maths/Physics/Chemistry. And fulfilling is a silly subjective term.

    I was always going to be a classicists until I realised how in terms of academic difficult they didn't not compare to the sciences.
    Sorry, you DIDN'T do Classics at Oxford?!?!

    Why did you imply that you did? Frankly, my experience is probably greater than yours! As it turns out, I'm the authority on this issue. I know three classicists very personally, you appear to know none, and I have a brother at Oxford right this very moment who would agree with me entirely on the strength of a Classics degree (thus nulling any of your anecdotal evidence from your time there).



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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    Sorry, you DIDN'T do Classics at Oxford?!?!

    Why the HELL did you imply that you did? Frankly, my experience is probably greater than yours! As it turns out I'm the ****ing authority on this issue. I know three classicists very personally, you appear to know none, and I have a brother at Oxford right this very moment who would agree with me entirely on the strength of a Classics degree (thus nulling any of your anecdotal ******** evidence from your time there).

    Talk about arrogance! Who do you think you are? Oh you did latin and ancient greek A level did you? Well done you. I did Latin for A Level and Greek for AS Level. Make me special? Nope. Didn't think so. Thanks for pissing me right off. Go and do some calculus.

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    I know way more than 3 Classicists very personally. Given that I spent 4 years at Oxford and in my class at school everyone bar me went and did classics at Oxbridge.

    Please get your brother to dig up and examiners finals report and see the grade breakdowns, then go and compare it to Physics/Maths.

    At Oxford you can get away with doing almost no Language options, and just philosophy papers in which you are guaranteed high grades. Go and ask you brother about that.
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    Lmao @ anyone who studied medicine. All medical students do is memorise a bunch of symptoms and then google anything they don't know to make a diagnosis. Or they just do a blood test and the lab tells them whats wrong.
 
 
 
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