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British universities vs Dutch universities

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    (Original post by jneill)
    dw. I know

    Thanks!

    (And I can see you are too - which is more important.)
    So my course offers a language alongside it. Since I'm not fluent in Dutch I get to choose from Dutch, Swedish,Italian,Polish and Czech. Atm I'm rooting towards Dutch but would Italian sound better to employers?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    we are talking about modern degrees here thanks
    Don't you have a Sociology with Theatre Studies degree...?
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    So my course offers a language alongside it. Since I'm not fluent in Dutch I get to choose from Dutch, Swedish,Italian,Polish and Czech. Atm I'm rooting towards Dutch but would Italian sound better to employers?
    That I can't answer. It would entirely depend on the employer and what you wanted to do.

    My thoughts: Italian is a more "popular" language, but you will be living in Holland so Dutch would probably be more relevant for your personal experience. And the locals would definitely appreciate it. On balance, I think Dutch.
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    (Original post by DarkEnergy)
    Don't you have a Sociology with Theatre Studies degree...?
    Yes Sociology major with theatre studies minor at derby class of 2016, your point being? Do you think this is an easy, or otherwise poor degree? I don't know how it holds up to the rest, but i can assure you that it wasn't easy, by any means!
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    (Original post by jneill)
    That I can't answer. It would entirely depend on the employer and what you wanted to do.

    My thoughts: Italian is a more "popular" language, but you will be living in Holland so Dutch would probably be more relevant for your personal experience. And the locals would definitely appreciate it. On balance, I think Dutch.
    Yup was rooting towards Dutch. I know German and its not too different from Dutch so could be helpful.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Yup was rooting towards Dutch. I know German and its not too different from Dutch so could be helpful.
    Should be a breeze then.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Should be a breeze then.
    Hopefully. Thank you!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Yes Sociology major with theatre studies minor at derby class of 2016, your point being? Do you think this is an easy, or otherwise poor degree? I don't know how it holds up to the rest, but i can assure you that it wasn't easy, by any means!
    Well you're trying to demean someone else's degree saying it isn't "modern" (whatever you mean by that, ~30 years ago certainly isn't ancient) and your general condescending tone isn't doing you any favours.
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    (Original post by DarkEnergy)
    Well you're trying to demean someone else's degree saying it isn't "modern" (whatever you mean by that, ~30 years ago certainly isn't ancient) and your general condescending tone isn''t doing you any favours.
    I thought I was the only one who thought he was patronising!
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    (Original post by DarkEnergy)
    Well you're trying to demean someone else's degree saying it isn't "modern" (whatever you mean by that, ~30 years ago certainly isn't ancient) and your general condescending tone isn''t doing you any favours.
    stop ganging up on me , thanks!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    stop ganging up on me , thanks!
    Drop the condescending tones and leave the thread please. I'd rather listen to an employer than some patronising guy who has no experience in the job market.

    Thanks and good night!
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    (Original post by Josb)
    You need a degree in translation to work in translation... The UK is filled with immigrants from every country in the world, employers can therefore be very demanding for these jobs. You just have to look at Reed; every translating job in Russian, Spanish, Arabic, etc. gets more than 100 applications. The only languages that are sought after are German and Eastern Asian (Chinese and Japanese).
    Moreover, employers often expect you to be fluent in at least on programming language, since much translating work is related to digital content nowadays (internet pages, software, apps, games, etc.).
    Actually, you don't. You definitely need a postgraduate degree in interpreting if you want to be an interpreter, but you just need to speak a foreign language extremely well to be a translator. An MA in Translation helps of course, and many translators do one at some point in their career, but it isn't a requirement. Proper translators only translate into their native language, so there will always be a demand for native English speakers who know foreign languages.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Actually, you don't. You definitely need a postgraduate degree in interpreting if you want to be an interpreter, but you just need to speak a foreign language extremely well to be a translator. An MA in Translation helps of course, and many translators do one at some point in their career, but it isn't a requirement. Proper translators only translate into their native language, so there will always be a demand for native English speakers who know foreign languages.
    Some people may get away without a degree, and it was indeed the norm until a few years ago. Now, in the current job market, it seems that it will not be as easy, unless you're happy working freelance for 1 penny for 100 words.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Actually, you don't. You definitely need a postgraduate degree in interpreting if you want to be an interpreter, but you just need to speak a foreign language extremely well to be a translator. An MA in Translation helps of course, and many translators do one at some point in their career, but it isn't a requirement. Proper translators only translate into their native language, so there will always be a demand for native English speakers who know foreign languages.
    I know there's a really big demand for English teachers in China,Japan and South Korea too. The amount of money they earn is gobsmacking.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    I know there's a really big demand for English teachers in China,Japan and South Korea too. The amount of money they earn is gobsmacking.
    Especially in cram schools and international schools.
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    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
    Especially in cram schools and international schools.
    Yup they offer to pay for your travel or something.

    I'm going to check my application for Amsterdam on Monday!
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    thanks for this hmm it seems neither of them are top 100 universities either for maths or in general. I guess they are decent back up options compared to open university which would cost more and give me less. However If I can make it I still want to be able to say I went to a world class university. I guess if i cannot get into a world top 100 this is what I should do.

    So this is really helpful and thanks for the reference, this is still the back up option though. Looks like open university is no longer an option this is cheaper.
    I just came across this and I thought you would like to know that the University of Amsterdam does offer a course in actuarial sciences in English. If that is what you would like to do in the future in Mathematics, it is also an option. And it fits your wishes of being a top 100 for your subject (At least in QS rankings). Hope this helps .

    http://www.uva.nl/en/education/bache...l-science.html
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Yup they offer to pay for your travel or something.

    I'm going to check my application for Amsterdam on Monday!
    From what I heard from my teachers, they also pay for your families to travel with you sometimes. Also gives their children discounts in tuition or sometimes a waiving of tuition fees for their institutions.

    Hahaha I haven't sent out my Uni of Amsterdam app yet O.o, should get around to doing that soon. :P
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    (Original post by wolfmoon88)
    I just came across this and I thought you would like to know that the University of Amsterdam does offer a course in actuarial sciences in English. If that is what you would like to do in the future in Mathematics, it is also an option. And it fits your wishes of being a top 100 for your subject (At least in QS rankings). Hope this helps .

    http://www.uva.nl/en/education/bache...l-science.html

    thanks for this
    hmm if I understand right that is an under graduate degree right?

    it seems alright I mean its high mathematical content I assume However whilst I think an actuary is a career I might like I don't know this for a fact yet and it is casting my net a bit narrow to specialize in only that. One of the strengths of a maths degree is how wide it can apply.
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    (Original post by Luke7456)
    thanks for this
    hmm if I understand right that is an under graduate degree right?

    it seems alright I mean its high mathematical content I assume However whilst I think an actuary is a career I might like I don't know this for a fact yet and it is casting my net a bit narrow to specialize in only that. One of the strengths of a maths degree is how wide it can apply.
    Yeah, it is an undergraduate degree. Hahaha, yeah just providing another option in case you want one Yeah a pure math degree is a more applicable degree to many different fields.
 
 
 
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