The Alternative Economics League Table (TAELT) 2009 Watch

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prospectivEEconomist
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#141
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notts totally got their intake wrong this year:

The continued popularity of Economics at the University of Nottingham has been demonstrated by unprecedented numbers of high quality students due to arrive in September 2008. The intake is showing a growth of approximately 40% on 2007 with all UK candidates achieving straight A grades or equivalent.

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economic...ons-update.htm
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Paulwhy
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#142
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(Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
notts totally got their intake wrong this year:

The continued popularity of Economics at the University of Nottingham has been demonstrated by unprecedented numbers of high quality students due to arrive in September 2008. The intake is showing a growth of approximately 40% on 2007 with all UK candidates achieving straight A grades or equivalent.

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economic...ons-update.htm
Oddly enough UCL and warwick were both 40% over target last year. But this year warwick is not over target. This year somone without a Warwick Offer rang up on Results Day and got in as a substitute for somone who decided to deffer a Warwick Offer. And I can't see Warwick letting that happen if they were over-subscribed again.
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prospectivEEconomist
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#143
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is it a good thing to have a bigger intake than planned, or worse?
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Paulwhy
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#144
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(Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
is it a good thing to have a bigger intake than planned, or worse?
Complex question. (e.g. from whose view point do you answer it).
But from the department's point of view it is worse: if they wanted more they would have had a higher target of places!
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silent ninja
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#145
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(Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
notts totally got their intake wrong this year:

The continued popularity of Economics at the University of Nottingham has been demonstrated by unprecedented numbers of high quality students due to arrive in September 2008. The intake is showing a growth of approximately 40% on 2007 with all UK candidates achieving straight A grades or equivalent.

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economic...ons-update.htm
That is a massive overshoot. What are they gonna do, hire more staff? Or try to cope, with possible detriment to students? It's bad news for the uni.

And what happened to "Paul's Alternative Economics..." ?
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Paulwhy
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#146
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well unis are bad up of mutiple agents.
It is good news for some: more fee income.
For students it will mean crowded lecture halls and more students in each seminar group.

And I preferred this thread title sorry.
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prospectivEEconomist
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#147
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I checked the timetable and the tutorial groups are 12 for microecon, and 16 for the maths ones. Is that bad?
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Paulwhy
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#148
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(Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
I checked the timetable and the tutorial groups are 12 for microecon, and 16 for the maths ones. Is that bad?
Well they are not terrible. But obvioulsy if there were 40% less students (and the same number of tutorial sessions) they would be 40% lower.
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prospectivEEconomist
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#149
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how many students per tutorial at warwick? 6?
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Paulwhy
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#150
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(Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
how many students per tutorial at warwick? 6?
No nothing like that low.
Similar to the Notts figures you quoted. It varies though by course and by when they are in the day e.g. less people sign up for 9am seminars than 12am ones
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prospectivEEconomist
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#151
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oh okay. I noticed that I only have 7 hours of lectures in a week. Really disappointed - was expecting a few more.

3 - microecon 2 - maths 1 - intl econ 1 - european econ
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Paulwhy
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#152
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Anyway I guess the relevance of the 2008 notts overshoot to this thread (e.g. this is not the "I am going to Notts this year for econ" thread (Check out Dan's Concerned thread http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...6#post14089746 ) )is that Notts may give less offers for 2009 and hence be harder to get into.
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prospectivEEconomist
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#153
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lol yeah...might make it seem more prestigious if they reject more
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Paulwhy
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#154
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Updated the comments:
How come a lot of the tariffs are above 360?
Well the tariff includes points for all qualifications. So that is all AS-levels, any other UCAS point earning qualifications and all A-levels (even if that is >3) qualifications.
And yes a lot of successful applicants do 4 A-levels plus a couple of AS-level kickers.
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Paulwhy
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#155
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I have updated the opening post:
Am I at a disadvantage if i only studied 4 AS-levels and am going to carry on with 3 of them to A2?
Cetribus paribus doing more qualifications gives an advantage. As it:
i) shows your ability to manage a higher work load
ii) gives you a broader range of useful skills and knowledge with which to start econ at uni.

However unis want you to BOTH have an excellent academic record that shows your econ potential and have a PS that shows your econ inclination. So a 4th A-level is not a substitute for a good PS.

How many of the points come just from A-levels?
About half of the Warwick Economist have 3 A-levels and about half have 4 A-levels.
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Paulwhy
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#156
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Updated TAELT to give the groups explicit names.
e.g. AAA.1,AAA.2; AAB.1,AAB.2; ABB.1,ABB.2; BBB.1,BBB.2
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Paulwhy
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#157
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I have uploaded the lastest newest spreadsheet (It now has 7 not 4 sheets) and updated the documentation:
What extra information is in the spreadsheet version?
The excel spreadsheet contains the information in the printed version plus more details:
A-level applications As below plus some website links and some Work In progress columns e.g. on Further Maths , excluded subjects and applicants per place.
Scottish Applications Similar but for scottish applicstions
IB ApplicationsSimilar but for IB applicstions

Clearing 2008 Contains data on clearing used in the Economics Clearing 2008 thread). It shows which unis were in clearing for economics in 2007 and 2008. For 2008 it shows the different situations for UK/EU and International students. As well as tracking over time the UK clearing situation.

Most of the information on tariff distribution is not displayed above. And I have used the information to form the separate AAA,AAB,BBB and CCC groups. So the Tariff sheets are really worth looking out if you want to understand the validity of the groupings. (And if you are planning to use the group info to make application decisions you should want to understand them!)
Tariff Frequency What % of students came in each of 10 tariff categories
Tariff Accumulation Summation of the sheet 3 data so can see what % of students got below a certain tariff
OutputData onwhat job categories econ graduates from each uni end up in. see this post from the Econ applications FAQ for more details:
http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...21&postcount=4
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Krazysheep
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#158
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Thanks for this, an invaluable source of information.

I just have two queries; if LSE do not do non-AAA offers, is the listing on the UCAS site for Maths and Economics wrong when it gives an AAB offer?

And secondly, even though I realise Critical Thinking would not be looked upon as favourably would it still be a valid fourth A Level alongside other established ones i.e. to gain the 512 listed for Oxford could you have 4 full A Levels inc. Critical Thinking, plus an AS? At the open day they said they accept it as a fourth, but just wanted another angle.
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Paulwhy
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#159
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(Original post by Krazysheep)
Thanks for this, an invaluable source of information.
thanks

(Original post by Krazysheep)
I just have two queries; if LSE do not do non-AAA offers, is the listing on the UCAS site for Maths and Economics wrong when it gives an AAB offer?
My table is only for straight economics (except Oxford which is econ + managment). All comments (unless they explicitly say otherwise) are restricted to econ and straight econ at that.
(Original post by Krazysheep)
And secondly, even though I realise Critical Thinking would not be looked upon as favourably would it still be a valid fourth A Level alongside other established ones i.e. to gain the 512 listed for Oxford could you have 4 full A Levels inc. Critical Thinking, plus an AS? At the open day they said they accept it as a fourth, but just wanted another angle.
2 points here:
i)Yes all A-levels (even blacklisted ones) appear in the tariffs which come driectly and simply from the qualification entered on the UCAS form and the UCAS points table. So that completely ignores the issue of which qualifications the uni values more or less.
ii)2nd point should you do Critical Thinkng. Doing 3+Critical Thinking can't be less credit worthy than doing 3. Question is the gain big or small? and is it worth the cost? As an AAB.2 uni like Southampton is unsure about A-level Critical Thinking suggests that Oxford will not give it much value and you might be better off concnetrating on your other 3 A-levels.
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/socsci/.../entryreq.html
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Krazysheep
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#160
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(Original post by Paulwhy)
thanks

My table is only for straight economics (except Oxford which is econ + managment). All comments (unless they explicitly say otherwise) are restricted to econ and straight econ at that.

2 points here:
i)Yes all A-levels (even blacklisted ones) appear in the tariffs which come driectly and simply from the qualification entered on the UCAS form and the UCAS points table. So that completely ignores the issue of which qualifications the uni values more or less.
ii)2nd point should you do Critical Thinkng. Doing 3+Critical Thinking can't be less credit worthy than doing 3. Question is the gain big or small? and is it worth the cost? As an AAB.2 uni like Southampton is unsure about A-level Critical Thinking suggests that Oxford will not give it much value and you might be better off concnetrating on your other 3 A-levels.
http://www.southampton.ac.uk/socsci/.../entryreq.html
Ok, didn't realise it was only straight economics, sorry about that. The chances are I'll only be taking the Critical Thinking test next year (we won't be having many or indeed any lessons next year) so I guess I might as well go for it and not worry too much about it. Thanks for the advice.
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