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    (Original post by foxo)
    Those are poor reasons for its illegality. Cannabis has different effects on different people - some people are apathetic and lethargic already, and cannabis is a drug that appeals to people like that. Without it they probably wouldn't have done any better in life. I've smoked cannabis since 15, and at times have been a very heavy user. All the while I've managed to get stuff done - I did well in my exams, I got promoted four times whilst working for a year and a half and I've just started at a Russell Group university. Most of my friends who smoke are doing fine too. I'm not boasting, I just dislike the sentiment that it ***** with everyone. Furthermore, interesting people are interesting at all times - if your friends are boring on cannabis chances are they're boring without it.

    Your reasons for claiming it should be illegal are not "laughable" - they're stupid. Though it may have some downsides - smoking anything is not healthy - cannabis remaining illegal does not do anything to prevent those as it's so easily available and popular.
    I'm saying that cannabis is NOT any better than any other drug (alcohol included). So many people claim that it is healthier than smoking. Well, it isnt actually. You are still inhaling chemicals into your body and putting pressure on your respiratory system. It is the same as any other drug in the sense that it has the power to alter your mindset - unlike a cigarette - and has the power to affect the ways in which you do things. If you have never been one of those people, good for you, but you are a rarity. Ultimately, it is still a drug and it is illegal for a reason.
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    (Original post by shotgunkisses)
    But do you have a problem with alcohol being legal then?
    Well I'm actually not a drinker, never really liked the taste of alcohol. Alcohol is a drug too, it affetcs the way you think and behave - which can sometimes result in disastrous consequences.
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    (Original post by Antonia87)
    I'm saying that cannabis is NOT any better than any other drug (alcohol included). So many people claimn that it is healthier than smoking. Well, it isnt actually. You are still inhaling chemicals into your body and putting pressure on your respiratory system. It is the same as any other drug in the sense that it has the power to alter your mindset - unlike a cigarette - and has the power to affect the ways in which you do things. If you have never been one of those people, good for you, but you are a rarity.
    You've not addressed any of my points at all. If I didn't know better I'd guess you're stoned.
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    (Original post by foxo)
    You've not addressed any of my points at all. If I didn't know better I'd guess you're stoned.
    Erm, well you didnt really make any points, you just gave me your experiences of cannabis which happened to contradict mine.
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    (Original post by Antonia87)
    Ultimately, it is still a drug and it is illegal for a reason.
    I see you edited your post.

    Clearly it is a drug, and I'd never claim otherwise. However, the debate here is that the reasons for its illegality are not reasonable. Is it not possible that some laws are unreasonable? Do you form your morals around the legal system? Was homosexuality wrong until the second that it was legalised? Was it fine to take heroin until the moment it was made illegal?

    The fact that it is a drug and that it may have some detrimental effects for certain users is not a good enough reason for it to be illegal. As I supported on page four or five, I believe that its illegality causes far more problems than if it were actually legal. Legalising it doesn't automatically mean that it should be seen as morally acceptable to everyone - that's for you to decide - but ultimately legalising it wouldn't exacerbate anything, it would resolve some major problems its illegality causes.
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    (Original post by foxo)
    I see you edited your post.

    Clearly it is a drug, and I'd never claim otherwise. However, the debate here is that the reasons for its illegality are not reasonable. Is it not possible that some laws are unreasonable? Do you form your morals around the legal system? Was homosexuality wrong until the second that it was legalised? Was it fine to take heroin until the moment it was made illegal?

    The fact that it is a drug and that it may have some detrimental effects for certain users is not a good enough reason for it to be illegal. As I supported on page four or five, I believe that its illegality causes far more problems than if it were actually legal. Legalising it doesn't automatically mean that it should be seen as morally acceptable to everyone - that's for you to decide - but ultimately legalising it wouldn't exacerbate anything, it would resolve a few major problems its illegality causes.
    Think of it this way, if it were legalised here, do you really think that young adults would treat it in the same way that, say, the Dutch do? Lets be realistic, we wouldnt would we. We would abuse it, generally.
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    (Original post by Antonia87)
    Think of it this way, if it were legalised here, do you really think that young adults would treat it in the same way that, say, the Dutch do? Lets be realistic, we wouldnt would we. We would abuse it, generally.
    There is no proof for this statement at all. With the current grade C we have seen cannabis use drop by 2%. All current proof suggests that cannabis use will go down. When America partially legalised in many states in the 70s usage went down. All evidence suggests that cannabis use is directly tied to its price, as long as the price is kept the same (the price will actually increase) usage will be the same.

    You also need to look at it from a harm reduction perspective. Even if the number of people using stays the same we will still be getting tax on the product amounting to billions which we could use to help those in trouble with drugs. Furthermore people would be getting a decent product and the hard and soft drugs market would be seperated; leading to less hard drug use. Not only that but the use among children would also decline because the selling would be highly regulated like in Holland.

    The way forwards is education. Under the current system legality doesn't even come into it. EVERYONE can get cannabis with ease, it's upto them whether or not they use it. All that would be happening is a move from criminalising those who have commited no crime to anyone, to a system where a large section of society isn't demonised.
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    To be fair, Anyone that want's it can get it....

    Chances of death are extremely low....

    Chances of lung cancer if consumed pure(smoking), vaporized or through cooking is alot lower then smoking unpure (with tobacco).

    Chances of causing serious psychological damage is also very low unless consumed in large quantities. For example chain smoking an eighth a day every day over a long period of time.

    Now, if proper measures were used e.g. use of the drugs and keeping your allowance for the drug to a certain level I cannot see a problem with legilisation. The government will be making tax of the product, people will be able to buy good quality weed from a reliable sources where it hasn't been sprayed with crap....

    That is another reason consuming cannabis currently has larger adverse affects of the body, people are buying stuff which has had crap put into it to weigh it up e.g. fibre glass

    And finally, for a "good night" drinking you are generally going to sepnd 4 to 5 times more money then if you were to chill with a spliff and think you are having a good time.
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    I don't think pot heads should be taxed more. Some of them pay more than enough in electricity bills.
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    I think all drugs should be legal, it isn't the government's business when people live their lives.
    not to mention you could get an ounce of cocaine at 15 cents which is $1.50 or 75 pence in todays terms, think about how many actual crimes could be avoided with that.
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    just think how much tourism it would bring ;O
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    I got this from another forum (UG) and it pretty much summarises all the best arguments:

    1) Regulation. Illegal drugs are cut with all kinds of ****. Legalised drugs would be regulated and so wouldn't be full of crap. This makes them much, much safer for use. The impurities in drugs are harmful and cause (extra) damage. Varying levels of concentration are also to blame for lots of OD's.

    2) Tax. Speaks for itself. Alcohol and tobacco more than make up in tax revenue what they cost the NHS. Something like ?2 billion a year in cost, ?6 billion a year in tax revenue. There is no reason why illegal drugs would be different.

    3) Saves money. The War on Drugs is astronomically expensive and the police can focus time, money and effort on catching real criminals rather than pursuing addicts.

    4) There is no reason to believe it will increase the number of users. In the UK when weed was re-classified to C instead of B, the number of users fell from 11% to 8%. In Holland, weed usage fell after its decriminalisation. In Geneva a test program where heroin users were given safe drugs and a place to do it in caused the number of new users to fall by 80%. If you ask someone why they don't do crack it's usually because they don't want to be a crackhead, not because the police might lock them up.

    5) Lowers crime. I don't just mean drug possession/dealing. Drug dealing gangs are responsible for huge amounts of crime. Cutting out a major source of their income will cut crime.

    6) Drug barons go bust/legit. Drug barons aren't nice people. This would put the money into the hands of CEO's instead. Not a huge improvement I must say but most CEO's aren't quite as bad as drug barons. Either that or drug barons will go legit. Not an ideal solution but still cuts crime.

    7) Free up prison space. The UK prison system is dangerously overcrowded and the less said about the size of the US prison system the better. Suffice to say that there will be far more room in prisons when we stop locking people up for having an addiction.

    8) Hypocrisy. There is no reason why tobacco and alcohol should be legal and acceptable and other drugs shouldn't be. Far more people are killed by those two. Far more violence is caused by alcohol. Etc etc. It doesn't make sense and tradition is not a reason for anything.

    9) Cheaper. If drugs are legal then they'd be cheaper (even when taxed). This would mean that drug addicts wouldn't have to steal (or would have to steal less) to obtain drugs. Lots of crime is caused by this and getting rid of it sounds good.

    10) People will be less afraid of getting help for their addictions and will make it easier for people to get into rehab or whatever. As it stands, it's kind of awkward given the illegal status of drugs. It's easier to quit tobacco and alcohol because you can get lots of help from the NHS and lots of other charities. Illegal drugs don't have this.

    11) Freedom. Even without the other 10 reasons (which IMO are more than enough to warrant legalisation) I would still advocate legalisation for the very simple reason that it is the not the government's place to tell me what I can do to myself for my own enjoyment. I can slice a razorblade across my arm, why I can't I stick a syringe full of heroin in? It seems ridiculous that there are actually chemicals which are banned. A somewhat backwards view for the 21st century.
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    Legalise, why... milton friedman said so LDO
 
 
 
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