In Britain we use the word MUM ! ! ! Watch

uthred50
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#141
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#141
(Original post by Bluelight)
This irritates me to no end. I dont mind people saying mum, mummy, mother, mam etc, because people are actually brought up to say these not just suddenly adopt an american term for a family member. I live in the west midlands for uni (notts) and nobody says mom so thats utter tosh.


Notts isn't West Midlands m'dear. Here, Mom's the word

Nothing to do with America by the way, we had it before they did
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deadgenius
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#142
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(Original post by Bluelight)
. I live in the west midlands for uni (notts) and nobody says mom so thats utter tosh.
WRONG! I know two people other than myself that say mum and everyone else says mom. And the only reason that we say mum is that all of us have parents from other areas of the country.

Pretty much everywhere in southern Staffordshire says mom. I can't speak for anywhere else, but I imagine that it is also used in other areas like Birmingham, Shropshire and Warwickshire - basically anywhere that has a Brummie "twang".

Anyway, isn't Nottingham in East Midlands?
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chelseafreak
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(Original post by Apollinariya[B)
]If you're from the Midlands, 'mom' is very common.[/B] Nothing wrong with it.
No it isn't. i'm from the east midlands in Northampton and the word mom is very annoying around. Its mum here as that is how it is pronnonuced
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username167718
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#144
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This thread has my approval. "Mom" is not a word.

My theory is that when some British people first went to America, they caught a cold and their voices went a bit nasal. People gradually adapted to using the nasal voice fr all words, including messing up a load of spellings such as "mom", "color", "flavor", etc.
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deadgenius
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(Original post by nterry242)
lol, a woman who works as the "Store Greeter" at my local asda says "12 pound" ... it's POUNDS!!
Isn't this quite common for the Somerset accent? And Lincolnshire?

I wish people would stop taking the very American view that Britain has only one accent! Some people say mom, some miss off the "s" in plurals and some talk about fruit when actually they are talking about stairs!
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tucker672
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#146
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#146
Mam, mum or if there extra posh its mother dearest. :p:
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steelmole
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#147
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#147
Language is free, you can't change it with silly threads like this. The sooner you realise this the sooner you will sleep easy at night.
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*Liana*
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#148
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#148
My Northern Irish grandma writes 'Love Mom' on cards to my mum/dad. I use mum for my own mother though I occasionally call her mam.

Usually I am quite a grammar/spelling nazi, but I really don't see why people get *so* annoyed about what's basically a nickname/affectionate term that will be dictated by your family traditions - we have gran/granny/grandma/nan/nanny/nana/various other forms based on different languages, no-one seems to mind about those.
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nterry242
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#149
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(Original post by deadgenius)
Isn't this quite common for the Somerset accent? And Lincolnshire?

I wish people would stop taking the very American view that Britain has only one accent! Some people say mom, some miss off the "s" in plurals and some talk about fruit when actually they are talking about stairs!
It's not necessarily the accent, it's missing letters off of words. Saying "pound" when it should be "pounds" isn't an accent thing, it may well be a dialect thing but they're different. And she's from South Yorkshire btw, I think it's just one of those things that when you're at work and I hear her say it about 25 times over a shift it sorta starts to grate on me lol.
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Slash_GNR
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(Original post by Apollinariya)
If you're from the Midlands, 'mom' is very common. Nothing wrong with it.
Speak for yourself everyone I know from secondary school, college, outside of school, family and even people at uni who are from the midlands all say Mum. I certainly would say that in Leicester at least and Nottingham (from what I have heard being here at uni) that Mum is more common.
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Deadmau5
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(Original post by nterry242)
lol, a woman who works as the "Store Greeter" at my local asda says "12 pound" ... it's POUNDS!!
everyone says that in london
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yellynh
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#152
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(Original post by Deadmau5)
everyone says that in london
lol second that!


Yeah....it's mum but I also say mother.


Mom sounds so...eughhhh
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LadySmythe
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#153
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#153
My bf spells it like Mom, it annoys me in texts, but he dies say it in a British way.

He is from Devon after all lol
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nterry242
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#154
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Maybe I'm just being picky .. I mean I probably say things like "13 pound" in natural coversation, but I think that if you're doing some announcements or public speaking you should try to speak "properly". For example - one of the women who work in reception say "can someone from 'ome n leisure please call...". I don't talk RP English but I do try to pronounce words properly when I'm on the phone or public speaking in my own accent
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Van der Zak
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#155
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I use Mama,

:vroam:
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Liam92
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#156
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#156
This irritates me so much - I'm always correcting people who do this :mad:
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noggins
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#157
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#157
Developed from chavs, they don't want to use ye olde English phrases and terms in the 21st century.
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Stubert
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#158
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Americanisation annoys me too, I say mum, by the way. Today in Chemistry today people were spelling sulphur as sulfur, it's just not on!!!
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kiss__this_x
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#159
(Original post by Liam92)
This irritates me so much - I'm always correcting people who do this :mad:
Nothing better to do?
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Fran Katzenjammer
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#160
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It's a different dialect, deal with it.
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