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    I'd say it depends on how much you all want to contribute in your respective seminars, or how much depth of reading you're prepared to do for your essays. I definitely don't recommend reading all four of Hobsbawm's books before you start the term, but I would recommend perhaps reading the two chapters on the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution in the Age of Revolution (as a matter of fact, the entire book almost entirely circles around those two events and is not very hard going at all), especially as you will keep returning to key themes again and again throughout the year.

    As regards to other reading, I actually quite enjoyed 'The Birth of the Modern World: 1780-1914' by C.A. Bayly (I don't know if it's still on the reading list) It's slightly more academic than Hobsbawm's works but I found it much more useful and readable (being unburdened by boring Marxist analysis is one point in it's favour).

    There's also course-specific books for your respective modules (if anyone was thinking of doing History of Russia I can recommend you some books before the start of term so you can get them cheaply of Amazon, Ebay, etc.)

    Lastly: the university bookshop is extortionate, as I'm sure you've heard. I'd really only go there if you were desperate. Learn to get to grips with the library early I'd say (alas)

    And that's me done, for now
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    (Original post by MJE)
    I actually quite enjoyed 'The Birth of the Modern World: 1780-1914' by C.A. Bayly (I don't know if it's still on the reading list) It's slightly more academic than Hobsbawm's works but I found it much more useful and readable (being unburdened by boring Marxist analysis is one point in it's favour)
    Wholeheartedly agree. I think Hobsbawm is one of those academics you will either love or hate, but I don't know many people who could stomach the whole book.

    Bayly, on the other hand, was absolutely invaluable
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    (Original post by Explorer Dora)
    Wholeheartedly agree. I think Hobsbawm is one of those academics you will either love or hate, but I don't know many people who could stomach the whole book.

    Bayly, on the other hand, was absolutely invaluable
    I've been trying to read the Age of Revolution to prepare for the year and it's... mixed. I found the first few pages completely off-putting, he kept referring to things no one would ever have heard of and I found it really dispiriting, especially cause I've been on a gap year and I'm scared I've forgotten how to do academic stuff! It did get better after a while though.

    My friend recommended Dark Continent by Mark Mazower to me, which is about Europe after 1914, it's excellent so far. Have you used it much?

    Hi, by the way, I'm sort of new
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    (Original post by Libbo)
    I've been trying to read the Age of Revolution to prepare for the year and it's... mixed. I found the first few pages completely off-putting, he kept referring to things no one would ever have heard of and I found it really dispiriting, especially cause I've been on a gap year and I'm scared I've forgotten how to do academic stuff! It did get better after a while though.

    My friend recommended Dark Continent by Mark Mazower to me, which is about Europe after 1914, it's excellent so far. Have you used it much?

    Hi, by the way, I'm sort of new
    I've read Dark Continent, it is indeed excellent, although it isn't the most relevant book you could purchase. I mean, I did Russian history and there are some brilliant parts about Lenin and Stalin, but it would never be your first port of call when writing an essay or doing seminar reading.

    Another excellent epic sweep book of the twentieth century, akin to Mazower's Dark Continent, is Niall Ferguson's The War of the World, but again, it isn't the most relevant book out there.
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    (Original post by MJE)
    I've read Dark Continent, it is indeed excellent, although it isn't the most relevant book you could purchase. I mean, I did Russian history and there are some brilliant parts about Lenin and Stalin, but it would never be your first port of call when writing an essay or doing seminar reading.

    Another excellent epic sweep book of the twentieth century, akin to Mazower's Dark Continent, is Niall Ferguson's The War of the World, but again, it isn't the most relevant book out there.
    Yeah, my brother recommended that to me, he does History & politics too.

    I'd really like some kind of introduction to the French revolution as I never did it at school, all I know is what I read in Hobsbawm and a lot of that went over my head, like names of people & groups I'd never heard of. I'm guessing it'll be quite an important thing to know about...
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    (Original post by Libbo)
    Yeah, my brother recommended that to me, he does History & politics too.

    I'd really like some kind of introduction to the French revolution as I never did it at school, all I know is what I read in Hobsbawm and a lot of that went over my head, like names of people & groups I'd never heard of. I'm guessing it'll be quite an important thing to know about...
    I think you can decide for yourself whether the French Revolution, or indeed any other big historical event or theme, is important. It depends on whether or not you'd want to write an essay about it, or touch upon it, or answer a question about it during the exam (if one were to come up)

    However, the best book I can recommend on the French Revolution is quite simply William Doyle's The Oxford History of the French Revolution, and if that's too hard going, even The Very Short Introduction's series on the French Revolution (also by Doyle) is recommended.

    Unfortunately, I can only also suggest sticking with Hobsbawm, perhaps doing bits a time, simplifying it by making your own notes, etc. I know he can be wearisome, though.
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    (Original post by MJE)
    I think you can decide for yourself whether the French Revolution, or indeed any other big historical event or theme, is important. It depends on whether or not you'd want to write an essay about it, or touch upon it, or answer a question about it during the exam (if one were to come up)

    However, the best book I can recommend on the French Revolution is quite simply William Doyle's The Oxford History of the French Revolution, and if that's too hard going, even The Very Short Introduction's series on the French Revolution (also by Doyle) is recommended.

    Unfortunately, I can only also suggest sticking with Hobsbawm, perhaps doing bits a time, simplifying it by making your own notes, etc. I know he can be wearisome, though.
    Great, thanks, I'll look into those. I have a million of those Very Short Introductions so I'll see if I have it. It's just something I'd really like to know more about, whether I end up writing about it or not. Still, it's refreshing to hear that you get that kind of freedom of choice about topics, compared to how prescriptive A-level was about what you wrote about. Or at least how prescriptive my teachers tried to make it...

    Yeah, I found just underlining phrases in Hobsbawm really helped. Perhaps I'll re-visit him after I finish Dark Continent, I got about halfway through so I might as well finish it off. I'm panicking slightly about not being able to remember how to read, make notes, write my own name etc., having had a gap year so it'll be good to make myself read something I wouldn't necessarily choose myself.
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    (Original post by Libbo)
    I'm panicking slightly about not being able to remember how to read, make notes, write my own name etc., having had a gap year so it'll be good to make myself read something I wouldn't necessarily choose myself.
    Don't worry about having a gap year - lots of people in the history department have taken gap years, and I've never heard of anyone having any trouble getting back into learning. Sounds like you've already read more than most will have, so you'll do great
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    (Original post by Explorer Dora)
    Don't worry about having a gap year - lots of people in the history department have taken gap years, and I've never heard of anyone having any trouble getting back into learning. Sounds like you've already read more than most will have, so you'll do great
    Aww, that calms me down a lot... Thanks!
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    You've actually read some of the recommended books
    Damn, why didn't I actually buy them when I had the chance !?!
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    Originally Posted by Explorer Dora
    Wholeheartedly agree. I think Hobsbawm is one of those academics you will either love or hate, but I don't know many people who could stomach the whole book.

    Bayly, on the other hand, was absolutely invaluable
    Am I the only person that really liked the whole of The Age of Revolution?

    I'm not a marxist...honest...:p:
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    Does anyone know anything about the year abroad in America in the second year? Anyone know what the deal is? When you have to apply, what they're looking for etc.?
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    (Original post by Eklipz89)
    You've actually read some of the recommended books
    Damn, why didn't I actually buy them when I had the chance !?!
    Haha, don't worry, I read like 100 pages of Age of Revolution and then I got too lazy. Barely anyone will have read any and I haven't read enough to give me any kind of headstart either!

    Am I the only person that really liked the whole of The Age of Revolution?

    I'm not a marxist...honest...
    I like it, I just found the first few pages really off-puttingm because it's been so long since I read anything academic!
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    (Original post by Libbo)

    I like it, I just found the first few pages really off-puttingm because it's been so long since I read anything academic!
    It made my brain mushy :eek3: but I got there in the end...the arts chapter took ages to read...so longgggg, and I know nada about romantic painters...

    Still kinda enjoyed it though.

    :work:
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    (Original post by Spike4848)
    Does anyone know anything about the year abroad in America in the second year? Anyone know what the deal is? When you have to apply, what they're looking for etc.?
    I think you have to apply very early on...almost as soon as term begins.

    I might be wrong though.

    ...Realising that reply is as good as a wooden bouncy castle.
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    (Original post by MmmAngelo)
    I think you have to apply very early on...almost as soon as term begins.

    I might be wrong though.

    ...Realising that reply is as good as a wooden bouncy castle.
    On the website it says we apply in December but I'd be happy to apply NOWWWWWWW so I hope it's early. More excited about the prospect of Georgetown than I am about Warwick... I went there this May and it's super. There's a Ben & Jerry's café in the shopping street, fer cryin' out loud!

    And with regards to Hobsbawm, arts chapter?! Oh dear me. I WILL read it, I will...
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    I know it's very competititve to go to America - everyone I know who applied was rejected. As far as I remember, people started applying in December, but you have to have a pretty much perfect record for the first term and a lovely, sparkling personality to even stand a chance
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    I have to be honest, everyone I know who applied to study for their second year in America managed to do it (and are currently there as I write). The main problems seemed to arise as to who would be going where (everyone initially wants to go to California!).

    But I have friends currently at the universities of California, South Carolina and Connecticut, and they all seem to love it. It's just up to you I guess how seriously you want to go there and where you'd be happy to study.
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    (Original post by Libbo)
    Haha, don't worry, I read like 100 pages of Age of Revolution and then I got too lazy. Barely anyone will have read any and I haven't read enough to give me any kind of headstart either!



    I like it, I just found the first few pages really off-puttingm because it's been so long since I read anything academic!
    phewwww
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    Just wondering if anyone knew what's going on with this online module registration thing? Apparently you can register for your history modules as of yesterday, but it seems a bit silly to be choosing them before we've actually arrived and had all the module talks? Especially when we've still heard nothing from the department!
 
 
 
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