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Do you see mental health problems (OCD, bipolar etc) as "real" conditions? watch

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    I hate the fact that people with mental illness need to validate themselves as being physically ill, as if it makes it less credible.

    Illness in your mind is a different thing to illness in your body.

    I do feel there is too much labelling going on and people mistake, for example, normal grieving for clinical depression etc. Doctors are too quick to hurry someone out the door with a prescription or referral. I also think some people are just very self indulgent and this results in a label of depression, and weirdly some people want to have it :confused:

    When it's real though, it's devastating and I view it as being as "real" as the person with flu etc. It just bugs me how people seem to hop on the depression bandwagon.

    Schizophrenia, psychosis etc. are a totally different kettle of fish, though.
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    (Original post by junglemonkey)
    Illness in your mind is a different thing to illness in your body.
    The brain (part of the body) is the organ of cognition. Your subjective experience of the world around you owes itself to chemicals in the body.

    You can affect hormones/neurotransmitter levels in your body by your thoughts (e.g. stress) and actions (e.g. sexual intercourse, eating food) and receptors in your body can react to surging levels of chemicals and create feelings of calm or alertness etc

    Can you see how the two are linked?
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    :yep:

    This is what I was saying earlier.
    (Original post by booraad)
    Don't patronise me. I didn't say it was the sole cause of schizophrenia. I said there is a correlation behind the two - and this is intuitively understandable if you accept that environmental stimulation causes re-wiring of the brain all throughout childhood.
    True... But this is one of those correlation doesn't neccessarily imply causation. It might just be pure correlation.

    For example it might be merely the condition induces the behaviour, and not the other way around.
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    (Original post by Bjpchilds)
    Eh, I've got a happy life all things considered. I love my family, friends, boyfriend, have a lot of interests, have offers from Cambridge and other good unis, make people laugh, aren't terrible-looking...I don't really have anything I can complain about that's triggered anything off. I agree that perhaps it could be a vicious circle kind of situation and I was told by a doctor once that in teenagers and young people (I'm 18) something like 60% of depression was 'situational', as you described, with about 30% chemical (like me) and then the other 10% was something else (sorry, I'm hopeless, trying to get my coursework done at the moment!) so I am inclined to agree with you on that matter. However, I think for some people (and perhaps most of the younger people who get it) it's to do with predisposition, awful situations, stress, or all three. I'm not quite sure why, but it is interesting.

    However, I think it's very unfair to say that they are not real medical conditions. If you have mild depression than it's tough but you can struggle through life (although you should try things like exercise and St John's Wort to help you through it), but when it's moderate to severe it can be hugely debilitating and you cannot will yourself to do ANYTHING, no matter how much you want or need to. Lethargy takes over you and you can't derive happiness from anything. Even if you try to be positive, it still doesn't get you out of it, and that's why people need to go to the doctor for help at that point.

    Again, sorry if this isn't well-written. Grr, coursework. Boo.
    Very well written, thanks. Does that mean then that you believe that your predisposition has been with you since birth, and again not something caused by your experiences at a younger age?
    For example, I went through a tough childhood and dealt with a lot. Now, I'm 100% happy, all the time. I deal well with everything, and I have high self-esteem - but I wouldn't consider myself 'predisposed' to be happier than most, it's a learned thing. Would you not say the same applies?
    I'm certainly not saying that there's anything wrong with getting help, of course, I just disagree with classifying what I consider normal behaviours and symptoms into 'illnesses', causing self-fulfilling prophecies, and then treating them as such with medicines.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I'm interested in hearing actually. From my experience I've not met anyone who claimed to be 'depressed' or was actually diagnosed with depression who didn't, during that, have claimed reasons for it (i.e I became depressed after my boyfriend dumped me, or I became depressed when my Mum died) or who, having depression, didn't over-emphasise things in the way of 'I'm depressed, and I recently lost my job, I feel suicidal'. Do you not believe the chemical imbalance could have been CAUSED by the depressed feelings?
    It should be noted that there's a difference between clinical depression (Godspeed - don't attack me for this) and depression induced by environmental factors.

    I can say that I experience the latter mostly created from my own understanding of the world and difficulty. It doesn't have to have a traumatic basis.
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    (Original post by RightSaidJames)
    Well, the short answer is that it's a combination of both. Someone might have a predisposition (depression can run in families, for instance), or the abnormalities will just develop randomly, but it's perfectly possible that external influences can cause abnormalities to develop.
    I've just addressed this above with another poster, but does this predisposition not, in your opinion, again come from nurture? For example, if depression runs in families, would you not say that upbringing/attitude is the cause?
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    It'd be nice if you answered post #128 cpj1987. Being as it shows a depressive illness that only presents in accordance with geographical location, and has nothing to do with how you were raised?

    Not that I'm expecting much. Knowing you you'll put it down to those people being born south and then developing the disease on moving North to be suffering from home sickness. :rolleyes:
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    I believe that certain illnesses, particularly dyslexia and dyscalculia, are synonyms for stupidity in certain areas.
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    (Original post by junglemonkey)
    I do feel there is too much labelling going on and people mistake, for example, normal grieving for clinical depression etc. Doctors are too quick to hurry someone out the door with a prescription or referral. I also think some people are just very self indulgent and this results in a label of depression, and weirdly some people want to have it :confused:
    There's a sense of identity found within depression/sadness (even if it's messed up.)
    People take comfort in that idea.
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    (Original post by booraad)
    The brain (part of the body) is the organ of cognition. Your subjective experience of the world around you owes itself to chemicals in the body.

    You can affect hormones/neurotransmitter levels in your body by your thoughts (e.g. stress) and actions (e.g. sexual intercourse, eating food) and receptors in your body can react to surging levels of chemicals and create feelings of calm or alertness etc

    Can you see how the two are linked?
    I do understand this, what I meant was that mental illness and physical illness are two very different experiences and two very different things.

    Often people with mental illnesses will try to rationalise their problem as physical (but it's just a chemical imbalance) when it's not. It may be a chemical imbalance (brought on by other things, mind you) but it just isn't physical illness. At all.

    They think their mental illness isn't as severe or worthy of attention because of it's nature.
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    (Original post by Tombola)
    There's a sense of identity found within depression. People take comfort in that idea.
    Why would mental illness give you a sense of identity, that's crazy if it's true. Why would someone want to be clinically depressed because they want something to relate to. Jeez.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I've just adressed this above with another poster, but does this predisposition not, in your opinion, again come from nurture? For example, if depression runs in families, would you not say that upbringing/attitude is the cause?
    Yes, it is definitely a contributing factor. But even in adoption studies (where the child isn't raised by family members), there is still a correlation of depression between generations.

    With schizophrenia, if, after recovery from a schizophrenic episode, the person was removed from the setting they were in before (there was a famous study into "schizophrenogenic mothers", for instance), they were less likely to relapse, but it was still possible.
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    They are 'real' mental diseases yes.
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    I've just addressed this above with another poster, but does this predisposition not, in your opinion, again come from nurture? For example, if depression runs in families, would you not say that upbringing/attitude is the cause?
    You mean depressed family members influencing their children to be depressed?

    This is getting way too close to the arguements whether intelligence/behaviour/blah blah is mostly nurture or nature... >.<
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    (Original post by JMonkey)
    It'd be nice if you answered post #128 cpj1987. Being as it shows a depressive illness that only presents in accordance with geographical location, and has nothing to do with how you were raised?

    Not that I'm expecting much. Knowing you you'll put it down to those people being born south and then developing the disease on moving North to be suffering from home sickness. :rolleyes:
    It just seemed like the most ridiculous example to approach me with, since it's clearly going against your notion of nature being a cause.
    If someone hadn't moved from one place to another, they wouldn't have ever developed the illness.
    I have no issue with the notion that moving from one place to another might cause stress/depressive symptoms, or that specific weather patterns can cause those symptoms. I've yet to meet anyone who doesn't even get SLIGHTLY upset/angered by British weather.
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    (Original post by junglemonkey)
    Why would mental illness give you a sense of identity, that's crazy if it's true. Why would someone want to be clinically depressed because they want something to relate to. Jeez.
    Well I don't know about clinical depression since I don't experience it. However to me the idea of finding identity in negative traits is not that unusual. The idea when people are sad, they'll look for people who validate their own feelings. What better than something to identify with?

    While I dislike continously being in a low mood. Sadness is an identity that I've adopted. If I removed it I'd be getting rid of a large part of me as it's shaped me in so many different ways, i'd essentially be a different person. It's similar to how some posters here with Manic Depression said they wouldn't definitely change themselves.

    People are strange? xD
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    Awh, I left the thread for too long and now I dunno wtf people are talking about..

    I'll just lurk..

    :teeth:

    Edit: Hmm.. there is a hell of a lot of twisting of words and taking out of context in this debate..
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    (Original post by xhelen1989x)
    Learning disabilities can be mental illnesses too, you know. Austism is a learning disability but is also a mental illness.
    Yes, but I didn't say that. I said that dyslexia was a learning disability, not a mental illness.
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    (Original post by junglemonkey)
    I hate the fact that people with mental illness need to validate themselves as being physically ill, as if it makes it less credible.

    Illness in your mind is a different thing to illness in your body.
    What if the two do interrelate? For the last six years I've been diagnosed/misdiagnosed/rediagnosed and been in and out of psychiatrichospitals a lot. Whilst I've had physical symptoms they've always been put to anxiety or dissociation or something. Then a new doctor came along when everyone was convinced I was having a psychotic episode and said they thought it might be a neurological disorder, possibly temporal lobe epilepsy. Three brain scans later, they have found abnormalities in the scans and I am being referred to a neuropsychiatrist.

    So is that mental or physical?
 
 
 
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