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    How are people stressed already when they're not even teaching, let alone full timetable! I'm still waiting for the stress to hit me, first 2 lessons I'm teaching are after half term. I have an essay due in 2 weeks, already half way and I want to get it out of the way before half term.

    I guess I'm lucky as I'm at a great school with a supportive mentor. If that's not your experience I can understand the upset.
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    (Original post by StarBabyCat)
    How are people stressed already when they're not even teaching, let alone full timetable! I'm still waiting for the stress to hit me, first 2 lessons I'm teaching are after half term. I have an essay due in 2 weeks, already half way and I want to get it out of the way before half term.

    I guess I'm lucky as I'm at a great school with a supportive mentor. If that's not your experience I can understand the upset.
    I guess different people have different stress levels. I'm feeling it quite a bit because I was ill for a few days of my orientation weeks so I feel quite behind. I fainted in the middle of harvest festival so I'm worried that I've made a bad first impression on the parents. My mentor is lovely but very laid back and last minute. When we go back after half term I'm teaching 30% timetable however I can't do any planning yet as don't have the medium term planning. The majority of my friends already have theirs and have a good idea what they're doing, so again I feel at a bit of a disadvantage.
    We have a Science academic poster due in next week and I've never really done one before, I'm not really sure what I'm doing, it's the first time it's been done so I'm not sure the university know either.

    I'm sure after the posters in, I've had a few days at home with my family who I haven't seen in ages and I've got the medium term planning so I can get to grips with what I have to teach I'll feel much better, but at the moment I feel a bit down!
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    I had my first teaching week this week: 2 days worth of lessons to plan and then teach. I felt very stressed last Thursday and then my car broke on Friday *rolls eyes*, but this week has been good I had a 'good' with 'excellent' for my profesionlism, values and relationship with pupils on my first official observation and my mentor has said I am off to a really strong start, which is a relief to hear! I think the planning is the most stressful part!!! They take me agessss, although I think I have gotten a bit quicker.Hopefully I'll speed up in time (hopefully soner rather than later!).

    I LOVE my class <3 and my mentor and TA are incredibly supportive (the whole school is just super lovely) and it just makes it so much easier when it is an environment like this!
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    (Original post by Sarang_assa)
    I guess different people have different stress levels. I'm feeling it quite a bit because I was ill for a few days of my orientation weeks so I feel quite behind. I fainted in the middle of harvest festival so I'm worried that I've made a bad first impression on the parents. My mentor is lovely but very laid back and last minute. When we go back after half term I'm teaching 30% timetable however I can't do any planning yet as don't have the medium term planning. The majority of my friends already have theirs and have a good idea what they're doing, so again I feel at a bit of a disadvantage.
    We have a Science academic poster due in next week and I've never really done one before, I'm not really sure what I'm doing, it's the first time it's been done so I'm not sure the university know either.

    I'm sure after the posters in, I've had a few days at home with my family who I haven't seen in ages and I've got the medium term planning so I can get to grips with what I have to teach I'll feel much better, but at the moment I feel a bit down!
    I am in the same position. I start teaching 30% week after next, and i am yet to receive medium term planning. Everybody else on my course seem to have planned and be all organised, so i feel a little bit in limbo. Hopefully we will both get them soon, and be well on the way with the planning!!
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    Half term


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    Hello everyone, I'm new to this forum and this is my first post. I too am feeling very stressed and unprepared I have just finished my first week at school. Although overall it went quite well I just feel quite overwhelmed by it all. I keep thinking about all the things we have to get done as well as teaching. I also start my first real teaching after half term I have to plan the weeks maths eeek.

    The thing i'm struggling most about is the weekly reflection evaluation does anyone have any tips??? Also my class teacher is my mentor so a little worried about what I say.

    Hope everyone is getting on well.
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    Hi guys i'm struggling a bit with my first essay. We have to evaluate a lesson based on certain 'criteria' for instance I have chosen literacy and use of ict in literacy. We then have to do a short literature review which is the basis for evaluating the lessons. The bulk of the essay should be the evaluation of the lesson. I guess my issue is how exactly I squeeze in a literature review of literacy and ict into about 500 words each and still cover everything I need to cover in order to evaluate the lesson. Never had to do a literature review before so finding it a bit tricky. I don't have much of a background in education so don't really know where to look first...
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    This thread is crazy. I am currently doing a pgce, its not bloody hard. Teaching is not rocket science. The course is time consuming with a ton of paper work but it is not hard!! Organisation is key. If you are feeling stressed then ask yourself 'am i on the front line in afghan?' 'Do i live in syria?' 'Am i fighting cancer or some other horrible disease?'. Unless the answer is yes then chill out and get on with it!l
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    (Original post by aj_12)
    This thread is crazy. I am currently doing a pgce, its not bloody hard. Teaching is not rocket science. The course is time consuming with a ton of paper work but it is not hard!! Organisation is key. If you are feeling stressed then ask yourself 'am i on the front line in afghan?' 'Do i live in syria?' 'Am i fighting cancer or some other horrible disease?'. Unless the answer is yes then chill out and get on with it!l
    Was there any need for that, really? So you're finding it easy. Yay for you. Others don't find it so easy. In fact the stress does largely come from the fact that its so time consuming, not that we don't know how to plan a lesson or teach.

    I dread to think how you treat students who are stressed out or are finding schoolwork difficult.


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    (Original post by nati_jade)
    Hi guys i'm struggling a bit with my first essay. We have to evaluate a lesson based on certain 'criteria' for instance I have chosen literacy and use of ict in literacy. We then have to do a short literature review which is the basis for evaluating the lessons. The bulk of the essay should be the evaluation of the lesson. I guess my issue is how exactly I squeeze in a literature review of literacy and ict into about 500 words each and still cover everything I need to cover in order to evaluate the lesson. Never had to do a literature review before so finding it a bit tricky. I don't have much of a background in education so don't really know where to look first...
    Are you writing it at level 6 or level 7? I'm afraid I can't much help as I've never done anything similar but maybe look at some lit reviews in journal articles to see what they're looking for. I know the level 7 examples they've given us is basically just a synthesis of authors, usually quite brief and to the point. Searching in some primary education journals for relevant articles might be a good start
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    (Original post by Kidders)
    Now into my 3rd month of the secondary PGCE course and i can honestly say i have never looked forward to Xmas quite as much as i currently am! This has been the hardest few months i have ever experienced. Such a massive amount of work to be done all the time. Lesson plans still taking me hours and I'm never more than a day ahead of myself! Assignment due in 2 weeks and not even beyond the introduction. Getting home at 5pm every night due to the distance of my placement school and leaving at 7:20am every morning. Weekends written off and relationship with my partner suffering!


    Anyone else feel this way too?

    Also a little reminder to all those wanting to apply for next year; this is CERTAINLY not an option for you if you're doing it just to put off finding a job! HUGE step up from undergrad degree!! (i think the MA students are a little better prepared)

    Rant over.

    I think you have to put it all into perspective. I, for example,am a healthcare student. I have to leave at 6am to start my 7am shift. I finish at 8.15pm. That's an almost 14 hour shift. I don't get paid, all I get is the hours. Although I'm not paid I am still expected to (and do) work hard, especially if things are short staffed. Working in healthcare is also no easy feat. Think children are hard work? Try attempting to help injured drunks and get nothing but abuse, or trying to calm down families fighting among very ill people, or when someone starts having a seizure, or is in diabetic ketoacidosis, or arrests. If you've had a really busy shift, and finish at 8pm, then don't get home until past 9pm, sometimes it can be virtually impossible to wind down and relax enough to sleep ready for the 5am start and 7am shift in the morning. Then I have to also attend University, and find time in an already 50 hour + week to do assignments, presentations, revise for exams, etc. To top it all off, when I've actually finished my training the pay isn't that great and the hours/work will only increase.

    It's a good thing that I love what I do, otherwise I would have quit long ago. I suppose that's what you have to think about too....do you love what you do? Do you love it enough to put the work in? If you do the hard work and hours will be worth it. If you don't, try not to turn into one of those teachers that hate school/children/people/life (I had many:P). I'm sure the lesson plans etc will comes more easily once you're used to it, and you'll soon adjust to the longer days. Good luck
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    Let's not turn this into a competition of 'whose job/course is harder'. Each one has their own challenges, and therefore can't easily be compared. Of course healthcare (and other roles) are stressful, but that doesn't make teaching any LESS stressful than it is to the people who are doing it
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    Let's not turn this into a competition of 'whose job/course is harder'. Each one has their own challenges, and therefore can't easily be compared. Of course healthcare (and other roles) are stressful, but that doesn't make teaching any LESS stressful than it is to the people who are doing it

    Well perhaps I am a tad biased as teachers (more specifically teachers unions) annoy me quite a lot. They get long holidays, nice hours, pay is not that bad and yet they strike at the drop of a hat. For someone to complain about leaving at 7.20am and getting home at 5pm is, to me, ridiculous. Doesnt most of the country do that?

    All these people negging me can you tell me what is so hard about teaching? Frontline workers, e.g soldiers, healthcare workers, firefighters...up against catastrophe and war, emergencies....whereas teachers teach children. By FAR the easiest job and yet they make the most noise. It's super annoying. Can anyone tell me why exactly a teachers job is so hard?
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    (Original post by La_Chiquita)
    Well perhaps I am a tad biased as teachers (more specifically teachers unions) annoy me quite a lot. They get long holidays, nice hours, pay is not that bad and yet the strike at the drop of a hat. For someone to complain about leaving at 7.20am and getting home at 5pm is, to me, ridiculous. Don't most of the country do that?
    School hours may be good, but teachers have a lot to do outside of lessons and therefore don't get the full holidays even. I lived with someone who had been a teacher for over a decade and she would work 80+ hour weeks
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    I think for me, I leave at 7.15, get back just after 6, and if at that point, when I got home, I could switch off and have a couple of hours to myself before I go to sleep I'd be fine. It's the coming back home and having an overwhelming amount of stuff to do that takes getting used to. And knowing that no matter how late I stay up and how little sleep I get I'm still not going to get everything done. I think once I'm able to tell myself that I've done the best that I could in the time I had available and not feel guilty things will be a lot better.


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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    School hours may be good, but teachers have a lot to do outside of lessons and therefore don't get the full holidays even. I lived with someone who had been a teacher for over a decade and she would work 80+ hour weeks
    Yes but if you consider that against the rest of the population. Teachers don't 'even' get the full holiday...what is it 8,9 weeks a year? Most people only get 28 days. Lots of healthcare workers will have to work late if there's an emergency, or be on call, or stay behind unpaid to do paperwork etc. My sister is a PA and sometimes she's in the office until 8pm, and always bringing work home. My boyfriend is a journalist and some days isn't home until 10pm. I'm not saying that teaching isn't difficult,or stressful, I'm sure it is. But it just seems as though collectively teachers are never satisfied, despite the fact that most of the working population face similar pressures (but don't strike every time they feel like it).
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    (Original post by La_Chiquita)
    Yes but if you consider that against the rest of the population. Teachers don't 'even' get the full holiday...what is it 8,9 weeks a year? Most people only get 28 days. Lots of healthcare workers will have to work late if there's an emergency, or be on call, or stay behind unpaid to do paperwork etc. My sister is a PA and sometimes she's in the office until 8pm, and always bringing work home. My boyfriend is a journalist and some days isn't home until 10pm. I'm not saying that teaching isn't difficult,or stressful, I'm sure it is. But it just seems as though collectively teachers are never satisfied, despite the fact that most of the working population face similar pressures (but don't strike every time they feel like it).
    I've worked full time, had several jobs before teaching (worked 32hours a week whilst doing my degree and gained a FIRST and worked full time whilst doing my MA - not easy) and nothing has prepared me for the colossal amount of work I've had to do as a teacher. Yes, I'm in my NQT year, so hopefully it will get easier, but I've worked 8am until 11pm the last three days (half term) plus working today, tomorrow and Sunday (not Fri/Sat night) on tasks that I didn't even think about when entering teaching or during my PGCE year. For one hours teaching, there is at least an hour of planning, making a range of differentiated resources and marking (still taking me ages). Some although we may be at 'home', it certainly doesn't mean that there is't work to be done - the pressure to be 'Outstanding' is overwhelming!

    Thinking of all you PGCERS
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    PGCE students or those thinking of teaching, avert your eyes. There are many positives to the job; felt so proud when writing my year 11 references this week

    From TES
    The statutory working hours for teachers are 195 days a year across 39 term time weeks. The statutory working hours are 1265 hours – when this is divided by the number of days it works out at 6 hours and 45 minutes per day, which can be presumed to be 6 hours work and 45 minutes lunch based on a working day of 8.30 am – 3.30 pm. On this basis, the actual number of working hours is 1170 excluding lunch.
    Having taken account of the number of working days, this leaves teachers with 66 days of holiday a year (inclusive of all bank holidays, including May Day).

    Outside of teaching there are 261 business days a year (excluding weekends). The average office worker gets 24 days holiday a year with an additional 8 bank holidays, creating a total of 32 days. The average working day is 9am – 5pm with an hour for lunch. The number of working hours in a year are therefore 229 days x 7 hours a day = 1603 working hours excluding lunch.

    Here’s the initial comparison (excluding lunch breaks):

    Teacher: 1170 working hours per year
    Office Worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 6 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 66 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays
    Office worker: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays.

    However, these calculations do not take account of teachers’ extra hours which I have estimated below. Please note that my estimates are based on personal experience and observation of colleagues and teaching family members and the number of extra hours may be more or less in individual cases. These estimates are the number of hours spent yearly on each activity:

    Parents’ evenings: 15 hours
    Open evenings: 3 hours
    After school meetings: 12 hours
    Extra-curricular (very conservative): 39 hours
    Detention / intervention: 78 hours
    Planning, preparation, marking (term time week nights @ 2 hours a night): 390 hours
    Planning, preparation, marking (term time weekends @ 6 hours): 234 hours
    Planning, preparation, marking (during school holidays, conservative estimate of 3 days per holiday across all three half terms, Easter, Christmas and Summer = 6 x 3 days @ 6 hours per day): 108 hours.
    Total: 879 hours

    On this basis a teacher works 2049 hours across the year.

    Let’s do the comparison again, just looking at the number of hours worked per day (presuming none on the weekend), but leaving the holidays the same:

    Teacher: 2049 working hours per year
    Office worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 10.5 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 66 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays
    Office worker: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays

    Okay, so it’s clear that if you average a teacher’s workload out they have a significantly longer working day than the average office worker, but don’t the holidays more than make up for this? After all they have a whole 34 extra days!

    So let’s have a look at a comparison of teacher’s working hours on the basis of having the same holiday entitlement as an average office worker:

    Teacher: 2049 working hours per year
    Officer worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 9 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays (would have to continue working 9 hours a day during the other 34 days ‘holiday’)
    Office worker: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays

    It doesn’t look so good now does it? Even with an average number of days holiday a teacher would still need to work 2 more hours a day than average to fit in everything they do in a year. So… what happens to the holiday entitlement if we give teachers a standard 7 hour working day? Take into account that there are 261 business days in a year.

    Teacher: 2049 working hours per year
    Office worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 7 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 292 working days per year
    Office worker: 229 working days per year
    Teacher: No holiday days and 31 weekend days a year worked in excess of business days
    Officer worker: 32 days inclusive of bank holidays.

    Its terrible how much time off teachers have is
    n’t it?
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    PGCE students or those thinking of teaching, avert your eyes. There are many positives to the job; felt so proud when writing my year 11 references this week

    From TES
    The statutory working hours for teachers are 195 days a year across 39 term time weeks. The statutory working hours are 1265 hours – when this is divided by the number of days it works out at 6 hours and 45 minutes per day, which can be presumed to be 6 hours work and 45 minutes lunch based on a working day of 8.30 am – 3.30 pm. On this basis, the actual number of working hours is 1170 excluding lunch.
    Having taken account of the number of working days, this leaves teachers with 66 days of holiday a year (inclusive of all bank holidays, including May Day).

    Outside of teaching there are 261 business days a year (excluding weekends). The average office worker gets 24 days holiday a year with an additional 8 bank holidays, creating a total of 32 days. The average working day is 9am – 5pm with an hour for lunch. The number of working hours in a year are therefore 229 days x 7 hours a day = 1603 working hours excluding lunch.

    Here’s the initial comparison (excluding lunch breaks):

    Teacher: 1170 working hours per year
    Office Worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 6 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 66 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays
    Office worker: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays.

    However, these calculations do not take account of teachers’ extra hours which I have estimated below. Please note that my estimates are based on personal experience and observation of colleagues and teaching family members and the number of extra hours may be more or less in individual cases. These estimates are the number of hours spent yearly on each activity:

    Parents’ evenings: 15 hours
    Open evenings: 3 hours
    After school meetings: 12 hours
    Extra-curricular (very conservative): 39 hours
    Detention / intervention: 78 hours
    Planning, preparation, marking (term time week nights @ 2 hours a night): 390 hours
    Planning, preparation, marking (term time weekends @ 6 hours): 234 hours
    Planning, preparation, marking (during school holidays, conservative estimate of 3 days per holiday across all three half terms, Easter, Christmas and Summer = 6 x 3 days @ 6 hours per day): 108 hours.
    Total: 879 hours

    On this basis a teacher works 2049 hours across the year.

    Let’s do the comparison again, just looking at the number of hours worked per day (presuming none on the weekend), but leaving the holidays the same:

    Teacher: 2049 working hours per year
    Office worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 10.5 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 66 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays
    Office worker: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays

    Okay, so it’s clear that if you average a teacher’s workload out they have a significantly longer working day than the average office worker, but don’t the holidays more than make up for this? After all they have a whole 34 extra days!

    So let’s have a look at a comparison of teacher’s working hours on the basis of having the same holiday entitlement as an average office worker:

    Teacher: 2049 working hours per year
    Officer worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 9 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays (would have to continue working 9 hours a day during the other 34 days ‘holiday’)
    Office worker: 32 days holiday inclusive of bank holidays

    It doesn’t look so good now does it? Even with an average number of days holiday a teacher would still need to work 2 more hours a day than average to fit in everything they do in a year. So… what happens to the holiday entitlement if we give teachers a standard 7 hour working day? Take into account that there are 261 business days in a year.

    Teacher: 2049 working hours per year
    Office worker: 1603 working hours per year
    Teacher: 7 hour working day
    Office worker: 7 hour working day
    Teacher: 292 working days per year
    Office worker: 229 working days per year
    Teacher: No holiday days and 31 weekend days a year worked in excess of business days
    Officer worker: 32 days inclusive of bank holidays.

    Its terrible how much time off teachers have is
    n’t it?
    oh my god, when you put it like that, why am I doing this again
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    Can't believe some one has resurrected an ancient part of this thread just to have a go at how teachers 'have it easy'.....bloody hell! Another thing teachers have to contend with; being constantly put down. Always blame the teachers!!

    This is a thread for PGCE students, anything else is just trolling in my opinion. Just saying.
 
 
 
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