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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Thank you

    Also I have quiet a few of these..

    Do I measure it in cm and convert it to M?


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    I don't know for certain as the context is not shown but go for metres.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    I don't know for certain as the context is not shown but go for metres.
    Yeah I moved on ill ask my teacher.

    How's this



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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Yeah I moved on ill ask my teacher.

    How's this



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    Correct, though you could just rewrite it as 12000 \cdot 0.9^3 if you can spot what is really happening here.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Correct, though you could just rewrite it as 12000 \cdot 0.9^3 if you can spot what is really happening here.
    Thank you!

    I just did this. Looks incorrect as it says how many years will her cat be worth £6000 and I did not get that.


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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Thank you!

    I just did this. Looks incorrect as it says how many years will her cat be worth £6000 and I did not get that.


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    So it would be worth £6000 after 6 full years. You can work out the exact amount of years but I don't think you can do that at GCSE.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    So it would be worth £6000 after 6 full years. You can work out the exact amount of years but I don't think you can do that at GCSE.
    I'm not sure whether it's 6 or 7 years.

    6 years is more than £6000

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    I'm not sure whether it's 6 or 7 years.

    6 years is more than £6000

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    These questions never make anything clear. Technically speaking, it hits £6000 during it's 7th year so it does NOT fully complete the 7 years which is why I'm saying 6.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    These questions never make anything clear. Technically speaking, it hits £6000 during it's 7th year so it does NOT fully complete the 7 years which is why I'm saying 6.
    How do I work this out


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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    These questions never make anything clear. Technically speaking, it hits £6000 during it's 7th year so it does NOT fully complete the 7 years which is why I'm saying 6.
    Heyaa can you help me on the one above please xx

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Heyaa can you help me on the one above please xx

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    m is the gradient and c is the y-intercept so you can figure this from looking at the graph. For the gradient, just pick 2 different coordinates on the line and find the slope as usual.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    m is the gradient and c is the y-intercept so you can figure this from looking at the graph. For the gradient, just pick 2 different coordinates on the line and find the slope as usual.
    Is this correct


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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Is this correct


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    Looks correct, yes, though it's hard to determine the gradient from a graph like that without any annotation.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Looks correct, yes, though it's hard to determine the gradient from a graph like that without any annotation.
    Thank you. I find it hard doing it on plain paper lined paper is easier.

    This question need explanation please so sorry for being annoying but I need to understand practise papers so I can do them alone.



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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Is this okay?

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    its wrong
    power of -4 doesnot mean that you have to multiply it with -4
    its mean multiply value by how many times
    in this question
    2p^-4 = 1/2p^4 =1/2p*2p*2p*2p =1/16p4


    hope it make sense
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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Thank you. I find it hard doing it on plain paper lined paper is easier.

    This question need explanation please so sorry for being annoying but I need to understand practise papers so I can do them alone.



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    Okay so for part A you should consider all the possible combinations from the spinner and the die in order to get a 3. This is a very simple example and I'm sure you can agree that the only way to get a 3 is from getting a 1 and a 2.

    So work out the probability that Sally gets a 1 on the spinner, and a 2 on the die, then multiply these probabilities together. You multiply, and NOT add, because this is conditional probability. She will get a 3 on a CONDITION that she get's a 1 followed by a 2 on the respective items.

    For part B it's essentially the same thing. List what scores Sally can get that are less than 5 and see how they can be achieved from the two items.
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Okay so for part A you should consider all the possible combinations from the spinner and the die in order to get a 3. This is a very simple example and I'm sure you can agree that the only way to get a 3 is from getting a 1 and a 2.

    So work out the probability that Sally gets a 1 on the spinner, and a 2 on the die, then multiply these probabilities together. You multiply, and NOT add, because this is conditional probability. She will get a 3 on a CONDITION that she get's a 1 followed by a 2 on the respective items.

    For part B it's essentially the same thing. List what scores Sally can get that are less than 5 and see how they can be achieved from the two items.


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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Okay so for part A you should consider all the possible combinations from the spinner and the die in order to get a 3. This is a very simple example and I'm sure you can agree that the only way to get a 3 is from getting a 1 and a 2.

    So work out the probability that Sally gets a 1 on the spinner, and a 2 on the die, then multiply these probabilities together. You multiply, and NOT add, because this is conditional probability. She will get a 3 on a CONDITION that she get's a 1 followed by a 2 on the respective items.

    For part B it's essentially the same thing. List what scores Sally can get that are less than 5 and see how they can be achieved from the two items.
    Is that correct

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    Not quite for part B. First list all the possible combinations that will give the score of less than 5. There combinations are:

    {1,1}
    {1,2}
    {1,3}

    find probabilities for each and add them up
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    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Not quite for part B. First list all the possible combinations that will give the score of less than 5. There combinations are:

    {1,1}
    {1,2}
    {1,3}

    find probabilities for each and add them up
    1/4 + 1/6?

    Do I do that 3 times?

    Or 1/4 + 3/6

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    (Original post by z_o_e)
    1/4 + 1/6?

    Do I do that 3 times?


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    yes
 
 
 
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