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    Overall the benefits you'd get from Latin and Greek faaaar outweigh whatever you can get from the Classics A level. I agree that doing Greek, Latin and Classics is a bad idea and you might want to add something else in there.

    Not that the overall thing matters, but you'd be insane to drop the languages if you can do them.

    A Classics degree means many things, with many different paths.
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    (Original post by Aesc)
    I was there for that speech, he was fab! Don't forget, you could always take up (or drop) a language in your second year or even wait until junior honours before starting with the languages. Iirc most modules are in translation anyway, apart from the specific language modules.
    (I'm probably going to put Glasgow as my insurance )
    He was quite a character wasn't he! And in that case, in the nicest possible way I hope you don't get your firm xD

    (Original post by RedDragon)
    Only if the Greeks can give assurances that they won't put them back on the Parthenon (would be lovely to see them there, but Athens smog would destroy them), also due to their 'financial issues' I don't think we need to worry just yet, they have more pressing matters.
    But they've got that new Acropolis Museum now specially built, and with the Olympics coming up and even people like Stephen Fry saying they should be returned this summer I'm afraid it's going to happen

    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    Overall the benefits you'd get from Latin and Greek faaaar outweigh whatever you can get from the Classics A level. I agree that doing Greek, Latin and Classics is a bad idea and you might want to add something else in there.

    Not that the overall thing matters, but you'd be insane to drop the languages if you can do them.

    A Classics degree means many things, with many different paths.
    Ah but I've done my A levels, I'm talking about university.
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    What? I have no idea how that works....are they separating the languages from the Classics somehow?

    I've also always thought it was pretty implicit that the Marbles are one of the topics we don't really discuss here; not that there is much of a discussion either way to be honest. There's no way they're going to be sent back to Greece, its just a bad idea all around.

    Also don't really give a **** what people like Stephen Fry say, I love the man but I've never understood how he randomly became the posterboy for pseudo-intellectuality. He's about as intelligent as anybody else vaguely literary with a good degree under his belt and not at all terribly insightful over a large number of things. Sorry, but his remarks on Alexander the Great, the Marbles, the evolution of the English language etc etc are no more pertinent than any other non Classicist/Archaeologist/Linguist/Botanist/Economist's point of view. Nobody cares.
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    Yes, they Classics department offers three courses: Classical Civ with no language needed or taught, Latin and Greek. I mean I suppose it's good for the likes of me who's never learned either language to be able to study it but I feel they should still be taught as a single degree.

    And I'm not saying he's qualified on the matter, not at all, but regular people do take great stock in what he says. But you're right I probably shouldn't have brought up the ownership of the Marbles, even under the context that I did.
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    (Original post by SacredWolf)
    Yes, they Classics department offers three courses: Classical Civ with no language needed or taught, Latin and Greek. I mean I suppose it's good for the likes of me who's never learned either language to be able to study it but I feel they should still be taught as a single degree.

    And I'm not saying he's qualified on the matter, not at all, but regular people do take great stock in what he says. But you're right I probably shouldn't have brought up the ownership of the Marbles, even under the context that I did.
    I'm not telling you off or anything, just that we have a few Greek members here and things might get a bit unfriendly. You know, I remember being told in my first year that there are three topics you ought to avoid passing comment on for modern political reasons. 1) The Elgin Marbles 2) The FYROM/Greece dispute and I can't remember 3. Not that it matters, to be honest.

    Re: your uni thing surely there is something in place to allow you to study both languages and also get the breath of a Classics degree? Would they be supportive of you self studying and then jumping onto more advanced courses for example? Its worth talking it over with your personal tutor or head of department or something. I'm sure they'll do your best to accommodate you.
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    I confess I hadn't heard about number 2! Interesting though

    I could do Classical Civ, Greek and Latin for the first two years and then Classics and Greek/Latin joint honours in the latter two years which is what I'm leaning towards at the moment, but as I said the lecturer advised against that unless you were certain...could you maybe give me an idea of how instrumental knowing Latin and Greek are when learning Classics? Not sure how they'd look upon self-study but it's probably moot because frankly I don't think I have the ability to learn a language on my own, especially if they're as hard as I've been told
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    Honestly I'm getting confused as to how you're managing to separate Classics from Greek and Latin to be honest since by definition that's what Classics is.

    The languages are fundamental, they're pretty much the basis of any serious enquiry into any aspect of Classical Antiquity with few exceptions. Well, you don't know how hard they are until you try. Several people, myself included, self studied. I know people who gained fluency in considerably more difficult languages too. Its doable.
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    I thought as much, guess I'll be doing Classical civ, Latin and Greek then! I can't understand it either, I get not having language as a pre-requisite but it should be compulsory at undergraduate. Thanks for your help, it's been just what I needed
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    (Original post by SacredWolf)
    Yes, they Classics department offers three courses: Classical Civ with no language needed or taught, Latin and Greek. I mean I suppose it's good for the likes of me who's never learned either language to be able to study it but I feel they should still be taught as a single degree.

    And I'm not saying he's qualified on the matter, not at all, but regular people do take great stock in what he says. But you're right I probably shouldn't have brought up the ownership of the Marbles, even under the context that I did.
    That's pretty unusual, I suppose being in Scotland it's a four year undergraduate degree?

    I always thought of the typical classical-related degrees being:

    Classics - study of Greek and Latin languages, with a focus on the study of literature
    Classical Civilisation - as above but in translation
    Ancient History - study of Greek and Roman societies through material culture as well as the other stuff, more history than the study of literature and philosophy
    or straight language degrees, Latin or Greek

    I may be wrong, but thats been my understanding..
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    (Original post by beesbees)
    That's pretty unusual, I suppose being in Scotland it's a four year undergraduate degree?

    I always thought of the typical classical-related degrees being:

    Classics - study of Greek and Latin languages, with a focus on the study of literature
    Classical Civilisation - as above but in translation
    Ancient History - study of Greek and Roman societies through material culture as well as the other stuff, more history than the study of literature and philosophy
    or straight language degrees, Latin or Greek

    I may be wrong, but thats been my understanding..
    Yeah it's all rather strange...Classical Civilisation at Glasgow seems to be split between history and the rest (literature, theatre, philosophy, oratory) from what I can tell, so perhaps too much like Ancient History?
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    Every Classicist needs to have a grounding in its salient disciplines though. Unfortunately we do still occasionally get people who, say, only do 100% lang and lit with no real experience in linguistics, archaeology, history etc but these are becoming rarer and rarer outside of Oxford because its just a retarded way of doing things and modern scholarship kind of reflects this.

    Look at any of the, many, recent commentaries you get, for example. I'm reading something on Pindar that, outside of commenting on the text, amply brings in archaeology, religion (anthropology), historical context and old fashioned philology. Because that's what is needed nowadays unless you're in a very lucky position where you can faff around writing about the poets use of the second person and psychoanalysis.

    Logical really. Who is going to listen to someone on a text when they don't even know wtf was happening in the authors time, for example? Its unthinkable in other disciplines and its been permissible in ours for far too long.

    Your best bet is to ask some of the first years we have, like Sappho, for example. They're covered a wide range of things already.
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    (Original post by The Lyceum)
    Your best bet is to ask some of the first years we have, like Sappho, for example. They're covered a wide range of things already.
    I'm here, just ask. Wo do Latin, Greek, Ancient History and Classical Studies. Since we take three subjects, I do LT, GK and AN, and occasionally sneak into CL.
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    (Original post by Sappho)
    I'm here, just ask. Wo do Latin, Greek, Ancient History and Classical Studies. Since we take three subjects, I do LT, GK and AN, and occasionally sneak into CL.
    And this approach will equip her to tackle a large variety of areas pertaining to the ancient world which confidence and style, resulting in a fully trained modern Classicist.

    Seriously though, it wouldn't harm you (or any of the other prospective students) to ask a few questions if you like, I'm sure no one will bite.
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    I'm about to start picking my modules for next year.

    All the optionals I want to do are in the Autumn term, as well as two of three compulsory. So I would end up having 9 hours a week in the autumn term and two in the spring term.

    Is it ever wise to do this? Plus maybe someone could help me. To do post graduate studies in Ancient History, do you have to have an ancient language? I have done beginners latin this term, and whilst I'm ok at it, I'd much rather do a historical module or two instead of more latin. But one of the girls in my Latin class is doing an MA in Ancient History, and didn't do latin so is having to sort of cram 5 years of latin learning into her MA, along with the MA course.
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    :hello: Hi everyone! I signed myself up to the society officially a while ago, but I think it's time for me to stop lurking and actually say hello. I'm a first year Classicist at Edinburgh, currently sat inside desperately reading Euripides in the hope of not failing my May exams. Procrastination probably explains my sudden decision to stop lurking
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    Hey!

    I'm a potential Classicist for 2012/13 entry
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    (Original post by sosotalk)
    Hey!

    I'm a potential Classicist for 2012/13 entry
    hey :sexface:

    I've seen you before on the oxford thread haven't I? :holmes:
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    (Original post by skunky x)
    I'm about to start picking my modules for next year.

    All the optionals I want to do are in the Autumn term, as well as two of three compulsory. So I would end up having 9 hours a week in the autumn term and two in the spring term.

    Is it ever wise to do this? Plus maybe someone could help me. To do post graduate studies in Ancient History, do you have to have an ancient language? I have done beginners latin this term, and whilst I'm ok at it, I'd much rather do a historical module or two instead of more latin. But one of the girls in my Latin class is doing an MA in Ancient History, and didn't do latin so is having to sort of cram 5 years of latin learning into her MA, along with the MA course.
    Are you even allowed to do it like that?

    For us we to do 60 credits a semester or you can get away with 70/50 (not that second year has any 10 credit modules)
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    (Original post by SirMasterKey)
    Are you even allowed to do it like that?

    For us we to do 60 credits a semester or you can get away with 70/50 (not that second year has any 10 credit modules)
    They didn't say I couldn't do it - and as I was a rep for Latin this year I heard a story of a girl doing something similar (the module selection etc have changed for my year so it was slightly different). I don't really want to for obvious reasons.

    There are others I want to take, and I think I might be falling for the trap of doing the modules that are specifically designed to sound amazing, but are actually crap. For example I want to do Alcohol in Antiquity, Sex and Gender in the Ancient world, the Ancient World on Film, and Plato on Love and Sex (paraphrasing the titles there).
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    (Original post by medbh4805)
    hey :sexface:

    I've seen you before on the oxford thread haven't I? :holmes:
    I believe you have. I'm not that active on here so I just post every now and again! Do you have facebook. I'm keen to get to know some people who I may be potentially going to uni with ^_^

    To do today: Reasearch to what extent Augustus maintained republican traditions.
 
 
 
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