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    (Original post by Narev)
    Nope, studying overseas at Warwick. Though, I do agree with your point about the bell curve. Otherwise, I'd probably be getting a 2:1 instead. However, I wouldn't find maths at University that unforgiving about those who have taken a two year break, because you'll either

    a) Be eased in gently into A level stuff covered before (considering other students haven't gone through the Singaporean A levels), and have a few months to work up to A level standard
    b) Cover something totally new and abstract such that A levels doesn't help anymore
    c) Find that proving questions becomes easier than before (ever tried to explain something to your superior in some super easy laymen's term such that he finally understands? It's the same with mathematics)
    icic, congrats on ur 1st...yea the bell curve in NUS is insane..how to fight against PRCs who are supersmart and who do nthng but study most of the time?
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    (Original post by Narev)
    You know, I'm averaging a mid-first in Mathematics despite taking a *cough* 2 year gap between universities. It's all about rigorous thinking and practice!
    Urm, generally, most universities do not like gap years for mathematics. Although you are averaging a mid-first, you could be doing much better; one anecdote does not prove the principle wrong.
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    (Original post by yonanz)
    icic, congrats on ur 1st...yea the bell curve in NUS is insane..how to fight against PRCs who are supersmart and who do nthng but study most of the time?
    You can spend all your time studying too? How badly do you want it. Also, the PRCs are only clustered in certain courses, which you should have researched about too...
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    (Original post by yonanz)
    i appreciate some of the points you have provided. when i said that 'everyone is mugging their ass off", I Dont mean it everyone in the literal sense. I meant to use this phrase as a general description of the singaporean mugger-***-GPA/CAP-centered culture.

    yes, my fren did NS. but he says its cuz of the stiff competition from the PRCs...who are smart and also trained to do pure mathematics (proving theorems) while we sgreans are trained to solve questions rather than to prove. we all know how smarts and chiongster these PRCs are lar, how to compete...
    I agree that its difficult in some courses, but in others, most of the people there are seriously unmotivated!

    You'll be surprised at the PRCs though; they haven't done some some significant aspects of maths, such as calculus too, and there have been issues with it. Check this out http://www.mth.kcl.ac.uk/~shaww/web_page/chinatest.htm

    They are motivated though, and so should you.
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    (Original post by Lifeisnice)
    Urm, generally, most universities do not like gap years for mathematics. Although you are averaging a mid-first, you could be doing much better; one anecdote does not prove the principle wrong.
    Well, the thing is, if you're intending to study mathematics at University because you have a passion for it and not because your father/mother/uncle/dog wants you to, you'll tend to do better despite the number of gap years you take, simply because the interest is there.

    I could do better, definitely. But y'know, I rather not, well, spend the entire day 'mugging my ass out'.

    And well, *generally* it's easier to score for mathematics, in that you *can* get full marks, but not very easy with essays in humanities courses at University. So yeah, on a bell curve, if everyone can get the same marks, it's difficult to maintain a first, but in the UK, when a first is just 71 marks (70 is a borderline first, if your work through the year isn't that good, it becomes a 2:1), it's not that much of a hassle (thankfully).

    Though yes, there's a group of people who compare firsts, like Low Firsts, Medium Firsts, High Firsts, and Excellent Firsts, but that's another story!

    Law on the other hand... Well, there's a quota for the number of firsts awarded for each University, so unless you're the top 5 or so of your level (I heard that last year, only five people achieved a first at the end of their course in Warwick), you'd not get a first otherwise. No idea about the percentage of people who get a 2:1, 2:2, or a third in Law though.
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    (Original post by Narev)
    Well, the thing is, if you're intending to study mathematics at University because you have a passion for it and not because your father/mother/uncle/dog wants you to, you'll tend to do better despite the number of gap years you take, simply because the interest is there.

    I could do better, definitely. But y'know, I rather not, well, spend the entire day 'mugging my ass out'.

    And well, *generally* it's easier to score for mathematics, in that you *can* get full marks, but not very easy with essays in humanities courses at University. So yeah, on a bell curve, if everyone can get the same marks, it's difficult to maintain a first, but in the UK, when a first is just 71 marks (70 is a borderline first, if your work through the year isn't that good, it becomes a 2:1), it's not that much of a hassle (thankfully).

    Though yes, there's a group of people who compare firsts, like Low Firsts, Medium Firsts, High Firsts, and Excellent Firsts, but that's another story!
    Passion is good, but it doesn't solve everything. There have been no famous male Singaporean musicians post NS; ever wondered why?

    Maths is like that. While I am happy for you and your first, I have little doubt that given the same input, your maths could have been better without gap years. Furthermore, I know you personally, so your exact circumstances and situation in NS was atypical; not many people will have the time to do as much maths as you did.
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    (Original post by Narev)
    Well, the thing is, if you're intending to study mathematics at University because you have a passion for it and not because your father/mother/uncle/dog wants you to, you'll tend to do better despite the number of gap years you take, simply because the interest is there.

    I could do better, definitely. But y'know, I rather not, well, spend the entire day 'mugging my ass out'.

    And well, *generally* it's easier to score for mathematics, in that you *can* get full marks, but not very easy with essays in humanities courses at University. So yeah, on a bell curve, if everyone can get the same marks, it's difficult to maintain a first, but in the UK, when a first is just 71 marks (70 is a borderline first, if your work through the year isn't that good, it becomes a 2:1), it's not that much of a hassle (thankfully).

    Though yes, there's a group of people who compare firsts, like Low Firsts, Medium Firsts, High Firsts, and Excellent Firsts, but that's another story!

    Law on the other hand... Well, there's a quota for the number of firsts awarded for each University, so unless you're the top 5 or so of your level (I heard that last year, only five people achieved a first at the end of their course in Warwick), you'd not get a first otherwise. No idea about the percentage of people who get a 2:1, 2:2, or a third in Law though.
    No, no and no. In Warwick last year, 6 out of 300 got a first, or so I heard. That's even sadder than NUS, where 5% are guaranteed a 1st class. In Warwick, and most other UK universities, you have to have a certain average, in order to qualify for a first. Its 70, I think. http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/la...hemes/17point/
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    hey lifeisnice..

    u can argue for all you want, seriously.

    im not talking about motivation or whatever. im taking about the flaws of the system - curve versus no curve. im saying that in a uk uni, a smart person even when competed against 20 other smart person at the top will still stand a chance for a 1st. whilst in nus, a smart person against 20 other smart person will inevitably result in a class division due to the curve. its undeniable fact. im talking about the top 20% or so where everyone is motivated and hardworking and reasonably smart.

    "They are motivated though, and so should you." its easy throw this bs around but seriously. on what basis can we singaproeans comapre to those PRCs? we are not in a vacuum and cannot remain detached from our commitments. yes we can be motivated by we hold on to significantly more commitments and inevitable distraction than those PRCs. its by virtue of us studying in our homeland, undeniable aspect of studying locally.

    ur website precisely shoots urself in the foot. with your eager to rebut my point blindly, you must have furiously typed words in search engines and scour the net for information to show how PRCs have not so strong fundamentals. but this website shows that calculus is taught more in the UK system, while in PRC, there are more emphasis on geometry, trigo andfunctions. precisely my point. earlier on i mentioned that my friend majoring in maths nus told me that the reason why PRCS do so well in maths is that (aside from being smart,hardworking and motivated) they are trained in specific methods of pure maths, particularly proving. i do not know the crux of it, but my friend told me that uni maths is more proving than solving, and PRCS maths curriculum prepare and train them to think in such a way, not the UK or SG system.

    when someone say PRCs do very well cuz they are smart or hardworking, its easy to say " oh its up to u whether u want it..oh sure u can be motivated as well" but all this sounds good in theory for the purpose of argument but in reality its all BS. chinese people mindset and work attitude is v different from sgreans, and our environment is starkly different. its hard to match up to their level of motivation because there's simply too much undetachable distractions and commitments we have, plus our lifestyle demads a certain level of commitment from us which is not the case for PRCs. i know of many PRC friends who are so motivated bcause they are brought up in a system more cutthroat and less comfortable materialistically. the mentality and mindset is very much more steely than singaporeans. to digress abit. i have lost count of the number of times i am impressed by the service of hardworking PRCs..they are awlays so polite, motivated and willing to work, even in unglam jobs. i teach a PRC english and within a year he could speak and write decent english. not so much my credit, but his incredible level of motivation and hardwork which i find it hard to find in singaporeans, including myself.

    furthermore, i personally find that most of he PRCs studying in singapore, esp thsoe in NUS,are very very smart. they have very strong anaylitcal and logical thinking skills and are particularly quick in grasping concepts. i have prc friends in sec school, jc and uni and find this observation consistent throughout. im sure many people will concur but i just wanna express a personal observation.

    so, back to the topic. all im saying is that with the curve, its harder to get first class because your performance is marked in relation to the rest of the cohort. so if u happen to be amongst the competition of many highly motivated, smart PRCs, logically speaking, you have less probabiltiy of getting a first class. u come in and for the sake of disagreement throw in all the BS about motivation and pass rates and whatnot but these are NOT RELEVANT! im talking about curve and its effect on the chances of securing good honours, not comparing pass rates or motivation levels.
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    It depends, actually.

    While say, 5% are guaranteed a first class at NUS, and nothing is ever guaranteed per se in UK universities, I think it all depends on the course you are doing.

    Example: Would you prefer taking the A levels when 5% are guaranteed an A no matter what, or the A levels where the A is guaranteed if you achieve a certain grade (or higher)?

    In Mathematics, and other science-cy based courses, the bell curve is a BAD idea, unless you're one of the super smart people / mug all day people / lucky.

    Let me digress a bit (sorry!)

    Say you're taking your O levels, and you've studied EVERY topic, but your teacher didn't teach you relative velocity. Well, the question came out, you skipped it, but you feel you've scored a comfortable 80/100, even without knowing how to do that question. You get your A.

    Sama sama, apply whatever analogy you want at University (lecturer sucks, didn't prepare for one minuscule section for the topic, stomach ache, etc), and some lucky bugger/study like mad bugger gets a few marks higher, and he gets the first, while you get a 2:1.

    That would suck, because everything then boils down to taking that paper itself (and what you write on it), compared to how much you've learnt.

    Anyway, uh, right. Bell curves are not necessarily good for such courses (mathsy ones), and taking a gap year (or two) is not necessarily bad for mathematics!
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    (Original post by Narev)
    It depends, actually.

    While say, 5% are guaranteed a first class at NUS, and nothing is ever guaranteed per se in UK universities, I think it all depends on the course you are doing.

    Example: Would you prefer taking the A levels when 5% are guaranteed an A no matter what, or the A levels where the A is guaranteed if you achieve a certain grade (or higher)?

    In Mathematics, and other science-cy based courses, the bell curve is a BAD idea, unless you're one of the super smart people / mug all day people / lucky.

    Let me digress a bit (sorry!)

    Say you're taking your O levels, and you've studied EVERY topic, but your teacher didn't teach you relative velocity. Well, the question came out, you skipped it, but you feel you've scored a comfortable 80/100, even without knowing how to do that question. You get your A.

    Sama sama, apply whatever analogy you want at University (lecturer sucks, didn't prepare for one minuscule section for the topic, stomach ache, etc), and some lucky bugger/study like mad bugger gets a few marks higher, and he gets the first, while you get a 2:1.

    That would suck, because everything then boils down to taking that paper itself (and what you write on it), compared to how much you've learnt.

    Anyway, uh, right. Bell curves are not necessarily good for such courses (mathsy ones), and taking a gap year (or two) is not necessarily bad for mathematics!
    sorry to digress. but which school do u think has a good econs course aside from the usual bigwigs aka ucl, lse,oxb,warwick? im thinking of doing econs (initially wanted to read law but decided to stick to sth im sacademically stronger in) but cant get into any one of the 5 as mentioned due to pne very unsightly "B" grade in my A levels....
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    Sorry, don't think I can help you there as I've no idea about economics Although, I do know a Singaporean year 2 law student who got into Warwick after missing the terms of the conditional offer (AAB) with ABB, but still managed to get in. Although, what with the the greater number of people entering Unis now, I'm not sure whether that still holds.
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    (Original post by Narev)
    Sorry, don't think I can help you there as I've no idea about economics Although, I do know a Singaporean year 2 law student who got into Warwick after missing the terms of the conditional offer (AAB) with ABB, but still managed to get in. Although, what with the the greater number of people entering Unis now, I'm not sure whether that still holds.
    ok thanks!
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    (Original post by yonanz)
    hey lifeisnice..

    u can argue for all you want, seriously.

    im not talking about motivation or whatever. im taking about the flaws of the system - curve versus no curve. im saying that in a uk uni, a smart person even when competed against 20 other smart person at the top will still stand a chance for a 1st. whilst in nus, a smart person against 20 other smart person will inevitably result in a class division due to the curve. its undeniable fact. im talking about the top 20% or so where everyone is motivated and hardworking and reasonably smart.

    "They are motivated though, and so should you." its easy throw this bs around but seriously. on what basis can we singaproeans comapre to those PRCs? we are not in a vacuum and cannot remain detached from our commitments. yes we can be motivated by we hold on to significantly more commitments and inevitable distraction than those PRCs. its by virtue of us studying in our homeland, undeniable aspect of studying locally.

    ur website precisely shoots urself in the foot. with your eager to rebut my point blindly, you must have furiously typed words in search engines and scour the net for information to show how PRCs have not so strong fundamentals. but this website shows that calculus is taught more in the UK system, while in PRC, there are more emphasis on geometry, trigo andfunctions. precisely my point. earlier on i mentioned that my friend majoring in maths nus told me that the reason why PRCS do so well in maths is that (aside from being smart,hardworking and motivated) they are trained in specific methods of pure maths, particularly proving. i do not know the crux of it, but my friend told me that uni maths is more proving than solving, and PRCS maths curriculum prepare and train them to think in such a way, not the UK or SG system.

    when someone say PRCs do very well cuz they are smart or hardworking, its easy to say " oh its up to u whether u want it..oh sure u can be motivated as well" but all this sounds good in theory for the purpose of argument but in reality its all BS. chinese people mindset and work attitude is v different from sgreans, and our environment is starkly different. its hard to match up to their level of motivation because there's simply too much undetachable distractions and commitments we have, plus our lifestyle demads a certain level of commitment from us which is not the case for PRCs. i know of many PRC friends who are so motivated bcause they are brought up in a system more cutthroat and less comfortable materialistically. the mentality and mindset is very much more steely than singaporeans. to digress abit. i have lost count of the number of times i am impressed by the service of hardworking PRCs..they are awlays so polite, motivated and willing to work, even in unglam jobs. i teach a PRC english and within a year he could speak and write decent english. not so much my credit, but his incredible level of motivation and hardwork which i find it hard to find in singaporeans, including myself.

    furthermore, i personally find that most of he PRCs studying in singapore, esp thsoe in NUS,are very very smart. they have very strong anaylitcal and logical thinking skills and are particularly quick in grasping concepts. i have prc friends in sec school, jc and uni and find this observation consistent throughout. im sure many people will concur but i just wanna express a personal observation.

    so, back to the topic. all im saying is that with the curve, its harder to get first class because your performance is marked in relation to the rest of the cohort. so if u happen to be amongst the competition of many highly motivated, smart PRCs, logically speaking, you have less probabiltiy of getting a first class. u come in and for the sake of disagreement throw in all the BS about motivation and pass rates and whatnot but these are NOT RELEVANT! im talking about curve and its effect on the chances of securing good honours, not comparing pass rates or motivation levels.
    Urm...

    I never said that its easier to get a first in NUS. What I said was it really depends on your coursemates. Do you mean to say that the PRCs are present in ALL the faculties? I find that very hard to believe; for example, a simple look at the FASS or even in say biology of the FOS will show you exactly how many PRCs are. What I'm trying to impress upon you is that the bell curve does not just work one way; it cuts both ways, and I'm quite amused that you only harp on the way it harms students. Of course if your course is filled with PRCs in a domain they traditionally do well in, you should reconsider your choice.

    In certain faculties, no doubt it IS harder to get a first because of these motivated PRCs, but my point is that in OTHER faculties, the converse applies too. I'm quite bemused that people like yourself will only focus on the faculties where it IS harder to get a first, while ignoring the others where it IS easier. I'm just trying to bring to your attention that its not all doom and gloom; you have to do your research first. In other words, while it IS true that "whilst in nus, a smart person against 20 other smart person will inevitably result in a class division due to the curve." don't forget that a mediocre person against 20 other even more mediocre students will STILL get a first, because of the way its structured. Sheesh.

    (Original post by yonanz)
    i appreciate some of the points you have provided. when i said that 'everyone is mugging their ass off", I Dont mean it everyone in the literal sense. I meant to use this phrase as a general description of the singaporean mugger-***-GPA/CAP-centered culture.

    yes, my fren did NS. but he says its cuz of the stiff competition from the PRCs...who are smart and also trained to do pure mathematics (proving theorems) while we sgreans are trained to solve questions rather than to prove. we all know how smarts and chiongster these PRCs are lar, how to compete...
    The distribution of these mugger and motivated types aren't uniform throughout NUS, and that is precisely my point. Just ask around in NUS, if you want to confirm it.

    Secondly, I've been aware of that resource for a very long time; I did not just find it. Do you remember the whole issue about the RSC's Chinese maths exam versus the remedial maths in university? This is from that period! I did not say that PRCs did not have strong fundamentals; I said that they did not do some parts of mathematics that is usually taught. If you want anecdotes, I also know an ex principal of TJC who was a maths HOD before who actually had to teach these PRCs differentiation and the like before university started... I believe she was tasked with doing that by MOE to prepare these foreign students.

    And lastly, no doubt Singaporeans will 'have' more commitments and the like, but it really depends how much you want to sacrifice. For example, I'm quite willing to sacrifice everything in order to achieve what I want to; when I was in JC, for example, my life was literally very sad, but I still think its worth it. Likewise, these PRCs feel the same, and I quite admire and follow their work sentiment. If I do not achieve what I set out to achieve, let's just say you won't hear anymore from me.
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    (Original post by Narev)
    It depends, actually.

    While say, 5% are guaranteed a first class at NUS, and nothing is ever guaranteed per se in UK universities, I think it all depends on the course you are doing.

    Example: Would you prefer taking the A levels when 5% are guaranteed an A no matter what, or the A levels where the A is guaranteed if you achieve a certain grade (or higher)?

    In Mathematics, and other science-cy based courses, the bell curve is a BAD idea, unless you're one of the super smart people / mug all day people / lucky.

    Let me digress a bit (sorry!)

    Say you're taking your O levels, and you've studied EVERY topic, but your teacher didn't teach you relative velocity. Well, the question came out, you skipped it, but you feel you've scored a comfortable 80/100, even without knowing how to do that question. You get your A.

    Sama sama, apply whatever analogy you want at University (lecturer sucks, didn't prepare for one minuscule section for the topic, stomach ache, etc), and some lucky bugger/study like mad bugger gets a few marks higher, and he gets the first, while you get a 2:1.

    That would suck, because everything then boils down to taking that paper itself (and what you write on it), compared to how much you've learnt.

    Anyway, uh, right. Bell curves are not necessarily good for such courses (mathsy ones), and taking a gap year (or two) is not necessarily bad for mathematics!
    Precisely, narev. A 5% cap works both ways, if there are many qualified people, some people will be burnt, but on the other hand, if there are not so many qualified folks, well, some supposedly 'undeserving' people will get it too. It all boils down to the bell curve. If you want more information, do refer to the CDTL of NUS; it has quite a lot of detail on this CAP system.

    Taking a gap year isn't ALWAYS bad, but in the majority of cases, it IS a bad idea, unless you do maths in the gap year. For example, refer to this by Oxford: www.maths.ox.ac.uk/filemanager/active?fid=12334

    Specifically, "Deferred entry applications in Mathematics, its Joint Schools, and Computer Science will be considered from applicants who have planned structured activities in their gap year;"

    What it implies is that unless you have planned structured activities relating to maths, it is HIGHLY unrecommended. I wonder why that is so...:rolleyes:
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    Assuming everyone's received an email from the Oxford admissions personnel (specifically from a Mr. Richard Little) at this point of time, I need to ask for a huge favour because I appear to have erroneously deleted the email from my Junk Mail folder:

    Please PM me with your details or reply to this thread, I basically need instructions on how to pay the $90 fee necessary for the HAT, or what would be even better would be the email forwarded to me, which shouldn't be a problem because I don't think there's any specific or private information that can be found in there.

    This is fantastically urgent as you can imagine because the HAT's on the 4th, so any help would be MASSIVELY appreciated!

    Thank you to all of you in advance!

    (I think the same email was sent out to students taking Art and a couple of other subjects as stated in the first paragraph of the email, so I would also be grateful for any help from you guys too!)
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    (Original post by RedefiningForm)
    Assuming everyone's received an email from the Oxford admissions personnel (specifically from a Mr. Richard Little) at this point of time, I need to ask for a huge favour because I appear to have erroneously deleted the email from my Junk Mail folder:

    Please PM me with your details or reply to this thread, I basically need instructions on how to pay the $90 fee necessary for the HAT, or what would be even better would be the email forwarded to me, which shouldn't be a problem because I don't think there's any specific or private information that can be found in there.

    This is fantastically urgent as you can imagine because the HAT's on the 4th, so any help would be MASSIVELY appreciated!

    Thank you to all of you in advance!

    (I think the same email was sent out to students taking Art and a couple of other subjects as stated in the first paragraph of the email, so I would also be grateful for any help from you guys too!)
    Have you tried emailing them to ask?

    What if it is absolutely impossible to take the HAT at the scheduled time?

    We hope that almost all candidates will be able to take the HAT at the scheduled time. If you think that it will be impossible for you to arrange to take it, please write in advance, stating your reasons, to the Organising Secretary for History, Faculty of History, George St., Oxford OX1 2RL ([email protected] k).

    http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/prosunde...anagements.htm
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    Hi,

    I am a secondary four ip student with some subject combination dilemma for A levels, glad if anyone can help me out here.

    A little background info, I would say I am an above average student with relatively good cca (school team and medals here and there). My aim is to read economics/law at some of the London unis, namely lse,kcl,ucl etc.

    Now, I'm torn between taking a full-fledged arts combination (History, Economics, Literature and Maths) all at H2, or follow the conventional Physics Chemistry Math and Economics. I want to know which combination provides the better chance of acceptance at the following universities. My first combination choice would be a hybrid (History Economics Physics and Maths), which i'm quite confident of scoring decently well in, but I've heard that a hybrid combination puts you in bad light, in the sense that it shows that you are not a specialized arts/sciences student, and even after 10 years of education you still can't find a niche. The reason for the Physics H2 anomaly is to keep my options open, for I MAY just apply to be an SIA pilot, and Physics at A levels boosts your chances.

    Should I go ahead with my first choice, or risk taking a standard arts/science combination? The thing is, I am not really interested in Chemistry , and the lit texts seem boring too, and I do have the aptitude for physics.

    Thanks in advance!! :p:
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    (Original post by R00NEY)
    Hi,

    I am a secondary four ip student with some subject combination dilemma for A levels, glad if anyone can help me out here.

    A little background info, I would say I am an above average student with relatively good cca (school team and medals here and there). My aim is to read economics/law at some of the London unis, namely lse,kcl,ucl etc.

    Now, I'm torn between taking a full-fledged arts combination (History, Economics, Literature and Maths) all at H2, or follow the conventional Physics Chemistry Math and Economics. I want to know which combination provides the better chance of acceptance at the following universities. My first combination choice would be a hybrid (History Economics Physics and Maths), which i'm quite confident of scoring decently well in, but I've heard that a hybrid combination puts you in bad light, in the sense that it shows that you are not a specialized arts/sciences student, and even after 10 years of education you still can't find a niche. The reason for the Physics H2 anomaly is to keep my options open, for I MAY just apply to be an SIA pilot, and Physics at A levels boosts your chances.

    Should I go ahead with my first choice, or risk taking a standard arts/science combination? The thing is, I am not really interested in Chemistry , and the lit texts seem boring too, and I do have the aptitude for physics.

    Thanks in advance!! :p:
    for law, there's no prerequisite that is really crucial, unlike med and engineering. for econs, there's probably a minimum of H2 math, which shouldn't be your problem unless you plan on taking H1 math. go check the online prospectus, the only requirement would probably be nice string of As on your cert. so as you said, if you have aptitude for physics then go for it. just go for the subjects you are confident of getting As in.

    and on a side note, i did take the non-specialized/hybrid route in IB. took english, physics and econs at Higher Level, when the standard practise should have been math instead of english (seeing that i took phy and econs at HL)

    the non-specialized might not be a bad thing, you aren't settled on econs/law right? i have friends doing about turns on their degree choices, like from chem engineering to law, med to law, econs to engineering. so i guess a mixture of subjects to play safe, is not a bad idea if you are not sure of what you intend on studying in university.
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    (Original post by R00NEY)
    Hi,

    I am a secondary four ip student with some subject combination dilemma for A levels, glad if anyone can help me out here.

    A little background info, I would say I am an above average student with relatively good cca (school team and medals here and there). My aim is to read economics/law at some of the London unis, namely lse,kcl,ucl etc.

    Now, I'm torn between taking a full-fledged arts combination (History, Economics, Literature and Maths) all at H2, or follow the conventional Physics Chemistry Math and Economics. I want to know which combination provides the better chance of acceptance at the following universities. My first combination choice would be a hybrid (History Economics Physics and Maths), which i'm quite confident of scoring decently well in, but I've heard that a hybrid combination puts you in bad light, in the sense that it shows that you are not a specialized arts/sciences student, and even after 10 years of education you still can't find a niche. The reason for the Physics H2 anomaly is to keep my options open, for I MAY just apply to be an SIA pilot, and Physics at A levels boosts your chances.

    Should I go ahead with my first choice, or risk taking a standard arts/science combination? The thing is, I am not really interested in Chemistry , and the lit texts seem boring too, and I do have the aptitude for physics.

    Thanks in advance!! :p:
    My honest opinion is: do what interests you, especially if you say you're good at the HELM combination. JC is a very intense period with a lot of studying no matter which combination you take. If you take something you dislike, you may me miserable throughout and misery is not great to have around when the work load is going to stress you out.

    HELM is not seen as a hybrid combination-- there are a lot of people who have done that combination and landed in top unis around the world as well as recieved prestigious scholarships. I think you see it as a hybrid because of econs-- econs is seen as an arts subject. Math is a very neutral, logic kind of thing so its okay.

    Anyway, most universities are more interested in seeing that you can cope with 3-4 traditional, rigorous subjects, then saying 'ooo look! He took chem and lit so he must be muddle-minded'.

    There are humanities scholarships available so if it's the prestige you're worried about (because I understand that in Singapore people look down on the arts) go for the scholarship and you'll have a special pull-out group to study with, with people who are quite dynamic it seems
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    I am kind of settled on reading economics/law, and I'm interested in the financial side of things,so I'm unsure about the hybrid/specialized route. I can't see myself working in a lab as a Chemical Engineer nor do i have aspirations in the medical field.

    The hybrid combination i meant was History Econs Physics and Maths, not HELM haha. If i'm not wrong, I'm currently nominated for the moe humanities scholarship, so I think i'll go for HELM. What i dislike about the hybrid combination is the prospect of having a screwed up timetable.
 
 
 
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